Advertisement

Doing Life Together

Doing Life Together

Help for Eating Disorders

If you or someone you love has an eating disorder, it’s best to get help quickly. Treatment can save your life! The longer you stay in your abnormal eating habits, the more ingrained they become.

The first step is to get a good physical exam with a physician who understands the medical issues involved with eating disorders. He/she will need to rule out any physical cause for the disorder and evaluate your physical condition.

Most people can be treated in an outpatient setting, but sometimes hospitalization is necessary. Hospitalization is usually considered when weight loss is severe, when there are serious metabolic disturbances, when there is a risk of suicide due to clinical depression, when binging and purging is severe or when you are experiencing psychosis.

Because eating disorders involve complex emotional, psychological and spiritual issues, you need a comprehensive plan that will help you overcome the disorder. Usually a team of multidisciplinary professionals is assembled to treat you. The team should include a registered dietitian, a physician, a mental health practitioner who can provide individual, group and family psychotherapy and a psychopharmacologist-someone knowledgeable about psychoactive medications used to treat these disorders if needed.

The dietitian will help you establish good eating habits, correct faulty information about food, and help you gain or lose the appropriate weight safely and sensibly. The emphasis is on teaching you to use food as nutrition, not as a coping mechanism. The nutritionist, along with the therapist and physician, agree on a target weight for you to achieve. It is her job to nudge you along to your target weight.

The mental health practitioner is usually a psychologist, clinical social worker, marriage and family therapist or counselor. The therapist helps you deal with the underlying emotional, spiritual and interpersonal issues that are playing out through preoccupation with food. The most effective models of individual therapy use a cognitive-behavioral or interpersonal therapy approach. The focus is usually examination and change of thoughts and behaviors.

Group therapy can be helpful in sharing your struggles with others who have the disorder. Groups help you feel less isolated, ashamed and more supported. Many groups provide good information along with support. Therapy groups can assist you in the practice of assertiveness, help you find your voice and identity, and explore interpersonal issues.

Family therapy is especially needed with young girls and teens. It is highly recommended for all types of eating problems. Family involvement aids treatment. Family work deals with family dynamics that contribute to the disorders.

Sometimes, not always, medications are used to help an underlying depression or anxiety problem. A psychopharmacologist may provide treatment recommendations to improve mood, control urges to binge and deal with excessive anxiety blocking progress.

Overall, the work of recovery and eventual freedom is a team effort using the resources of many fields. People with eating disorders often deny the seriousness of the problem. Some react with anger when help is sought. Denial of the problem is strong. Face your problem. Help is available. Early intervention leads to success.

 

For more help, Dr. Linda’s Book BREAKING FREE FROM ANOREXIA AND BULIMIA

Previous Posts

When God Doesn't Meet Our Expetations
Last Sunday was Palm Sunday, a glorious day in the church. We celebrated Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem on a donkey. I learned that the donkey was symbolic of a king coming in peaceful power. A King who goes to war would have ridden in on a warhorse. A King who comes in peace rides a donke

posted 6:00:47am Mar. 31, 2015 | read full post »

The Mismatch of Conflict Styles: How to Handle It
                If you've taken the FREE quiz on my website, drlindahelps.com, you know your conflict style--avoider, reactor or negotiator. Now the issue is, does your style match with those with whom you are intimate? What happens whe

posted 6:00:28am Mar. 30, 2015 | read full post »

8 Questions: Are You A Hard Worker or Workalholic?
In the same way a drug addict uses cocaine or an alcoholic downs booze, work can have an anesthetizing effect on negative emotions. People use work to escape and avoid unpleasant emotional states. But because hard work is so sanctioned in our society, it is an addiction often minimized. Our once

posted 6:00:40am Mar. 27, 2015 | read full post »

Breaking the Mental Habit of Worry
Because worry is in the mind, it is a mental habit that must be broken. Here are a few practical tips to help break the worry habit: Identify the thought behind the worried or anxious feeling. Let it come and don’t try to suppress it with thoughts like, “Stop worrying” “Don’t do this

posted 6:00:40am Mar. 25, 2015 | read full post »

Hurt By a Conflict? How Do You ReBuild Trust?
You've heard the saying, trust is easy to break, hard to repair. How do you go about building trust with someone you’ve hurt! The key is to know the other person’s world and reliably respond to it. Do what you say. Keep your promises. Empathize with the other person’s issue and try to see t

posted 6:00:39am Mar. 23, 2015 | read full post »

Advertisement


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.