The Deacon's Bench

The Deacon's Bench


Why burning the Quran is a sin

posted by jmcgee

The esteemed Msgr. Charles Pope from the Archdiocese of Washington sums it up well:

images.jpgIntentionally giving offense is wrong. I do not deny that there are problems in the Islamic world. But I also know that it is wrong to intentionally and grievously give offense to the religious traditions of others. Proper discussions, even debate about religious differences are healthy and part of evangelization. But ridicule and offensive practices directed against others is not of the Christian faith. Scripture says: Always be prepared to give an account to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that is in you. But do this with gentleness and respect (1 Peter 3:15).

Further, to tempt others to sin is wrong. It is a true fact that Pastor Jones’ plans have incited anger and threats. There are many in the Islamic World who have, in fact, a violent sense of their faith. Their view is morally wrong. But to needlessly incite that anger is also wrong. Knowing that there are violent tendencies in sectors of Islam, it is wrong to inflame those tendencies and draw others to anger and violence. In effect Pastor Jones is tempting others to sin. He may have a right to do this but it is not necessary for him to do this. This compounds the sinfulness of the planned book burning.

It is also wrong to endanger the lives of others by reckless behavior. It is a strong likelihood that hundreds, possibly thousands may die if rioting occurs. It is easy for us to say, “Well they shouldn’t get so worked up about it….see the problem is theirs.” That is a debate for another time. But this action is sure to inflame passions. General David Petraeus has warned that our troops will also be endangered by these reckless plans. He has urged Jones to back down. Pastor Jones says he will “pray about it.”

Pastor Terry Jones is gravely misled if he thinks Jesus might tell him to do this. Jesus had a different notion: You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I tell you: Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you,that you may be sons of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. If you love those who love you, what reward will you get? Are not even the tax collectors doing that? And if you greet only your brothers, what are you doing more than others? Do not even pagans do that? (Matt 5:43-47).

Check out the rest. Makes sense to me.



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F.J. Christopher

posted September 9, 2010 at 12:18 am


I agree with you that burning a Quran is a direct act intended to injure others and thus a sin and directly contrary to the teachings of Christ. I also think that “Pastor” Jones is using his Quran burning scheme as a publicity stunt to sell his book claiming that the Devil is behind Islam. He sure is getting a lot of undeserved media attention. Why aren’t the media publicizing the good work being done between Muslims and Christians? Why must the media always focus on the crackpots? I also wrote to “Pastor” Jones to tell him that I thought the Devil was motivating his Quran burning scheme. I think the Devil guides the media too often as well.



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Andre John

posted September 9, 2010 at 12:55 am


and just in time for the end of Ramadan (Sept.10,2010)
and of course the anniversary of 9/11/2001.
shame on you pastor, and on your publicity stunt :(
CAPTCHA: wide leadmany



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Dink

posted September 9, 2010 at 1:24 am


Are you saying Jesus was wrong to overturn the tables in the Temple and call the people thieves?



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Strong Believer

posted September 9, 2010 at 1:41 am


Well i agree with you.Despite of the fact that i hate Paster coz he is surely following the beleifs of “Devil”.The two communities Chritians & Muslims both respect their holy books coz its a part of their religions.And we must promote harmony as the muslims do, we should always think positive about muslims.We should not provoke them that is not in our interests. “Paster” said he prays infront of his devil and then he will think,…..shame on you paster…simply shame!!
Join hands to stop Paster’s shameful Act!



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Hey Dink

posted September 9, 2010 at 1:44 am


Of course Jesus Christ was not wrong. I wonder what He would say about a “pastor” using a church for personal profit? It seems that “pastor” Jones is forgetting many of Jesus’s lessons. Perhaps, instead of using the pulpit to spread gossip about a different faith and spending time writing about the “evils” of another he should would be better served spreading the word of Christ, getting reaquainted with the lessons He taught us, and striving to be more Christlike.
Just my 2 cents



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Your Name

posted September 9, 2010 at 6:11 am


Have you people read the Qur’an? If not, why do you say it is a sin?



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Concerned

posted September 9, 2010 at 6:45 am


Read the story of Asa (1 Kings 15). He started out by destroying the false gods and idols and was blessed. He was at war with sin. Later he capitulated by trying to bribe another king to not invade his land instead of seeking the Lord. Asa’s reign did not end well due to his acts of being “inclusive” and “diverse”. As Christians we are expected to be at war with sin. We should drive the culture – not the other way around. Just think how blessed we (US) would be if we followed Jesus with all our heart – the most important commandment.
Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind. This comes before love your neighbor as yourself.



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RomCath

posted September 9, 2010 at 7:24 am


This would have been a non story had the media not gone crazy with it. It should have ignored from the get go.



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Chris

posted September 9, 2010 at 8:10 am


Sorry, burning a book is NOT a sin. It may be offensive to some and a crude and ridiculous gesture, but not a “sin.” It’s a symbolic act, no more offensive than the burning of American flags that is a daily ritual among the Arab cultures you so prostratingly wish to subjugate yourself to, monseigneur.



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Mondo

posted September 9, 2010 at 9:02 am


My brother Deacon,
Not beating down and destroying the apostasy of Islam (by all means possible) is a denial of our Lord and Savior’s providence and a refutation of what we are commanded to do in the Bible. Who said “He who denies Me before man, I shall deny before my Father in heaven”
With a loving heart.



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Ann Van tries

posted September 9, 2010 at 9:11 am


For heaven’s sake, DON’T BURN THE KORAN. READ IT. Learn what we are dealing with. And don’t forget to read your BIBLE. Learn how to “heap coals of fire” on the heads of those who would do you harm.



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Panthera

posted September 9, 2010 at 9:16 am


What an account this gives to God. The last major book burners were the Nazis. Now, it is the Christians.
Before you grab your keyboard and scream at me, remember, it is not the Christian who shows the world God’s love and forgiveness who will be noticed by the Muslim world – it is this act of sheer hatred which will be marked as ‘Christian’ by them.
What a grand way to show Jesus is the path to God. Can’t fail.



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AML

posted September 9, 2010 at 9:24 am


No- it is not a “sin” to burn these books. While it may be unethical, demeaning, wrong, and non-productive (in showing others God’s love) it certainly isn’t a “sin.” Sin is a condition of Man- not an action. That being said, if these people are Christians and truly interested in reaching out to Muslims, the last thing they should be doing is burning their religious symbols. I agree with previous posters in that this is really about media frenzy- we don’t see this kind of reaction when Christian religious symbols are defaced or when the American flag is burned. I think it is entirely political.



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Fran Rossi Szpylczyn

posted September 9, 2010 at 9:45 am


Did anyone read or hear today’s Gospel?



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BobRN

posted September 9, 2010 at 9:52 am


Count me in with Msgr. Pope and The First Epistle of Peter. I don’t see how this will accomplish any good. This is a fierce wrong, committed by a megalomaniac looking for attention and profit. Shame on him and shame on those who play into his game by giving him the attention he craves.



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Ed Cooper

posted September 9, 2010 at 10:08 am


Fighting Evil with evil?
Even though the bible tells us to hate evil it also warns us to judge not least we be judged.
Pastor Terry Jones proposed action adds to the tension between Muslims and Christians.
Is this the attitude that our King and savior encourages us to display? I don,t think so!
Jesus admonishs us to show love towards our enemies.
Luke 6: 27-37 states:
27. But I say unto you which hear, Love your enemies, do good to them which hate you,
28. Bless them that curse you, and pray for them which despitefully use you.
29. And unto him that smiteth thee on the one cheek offer also the other; and him that taketh away thy cloak forbid not to take thy coat also.
30. Give to every man that asketh of thee; and of him that taketh away thy goods ask them not again.
31. And as ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise.
32. For if ye love them which love you, what thank have ye? for sinners also love those that love them.
33. And if ye do good to them which do good to you, what thank have ye? for sinners also do even the same.
34. And if ye lend to them of whom ye hope to receive, what thank have ye? for sinners also lend to sinners, to receive as much again.
35. But love ye your enemies, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing again; and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest: for he is kind unto the unthankful and to the evil.
36. Be ye therefore merciful, as your Father also is merciful.
37. Judge not, and ye shall not be judged: condemn not, and ye shall not be condemned: forgive, and ye shall be forgiven:
More encouragement is given at Romans: 12:
20. Therefore if thine enemy hunger, feed him; if he thirst, give him drink: for in so doing thou shalt heap coals of fire on his head.
21. Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good.



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JEANNIEMAC

posted September 9, 2010 at 10:36 am


G. K. Chesterton:
“Having the right to do something, is not at all the same as being right in doing it.”



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RomCath

posted September 9, 2010 at 10:39 am


“Sin is a condition of Man- not an action.”
Huh? What in the world does that mean?



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chris

posted September 9, 2010 at 11:35 am


where is the outrage in the fact that the Pastor is simply burning paper and tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of people are threatening violence?
Where is the outrage from the these same fanatics when an American is beheaded? A soldier killed, stripped and then burned?
Sorry, I side with the Florida pastor. It may not be the right message but it is time someone in the USA stands up to Islamic fanatics and sends any message.



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Klaire

posted September 9, 2010 at 11:59 am


Chris, while I certainly can’t agree with your support of buring ANY relgious text, you do provoke a well needed point.
IF we as a country, weren’t so bamboozled with “political correctness”, in addition to cowardice, we might not have things like this happening.
In an almost uncanny way, it sort of fits with today’s deep meaning of the gospel, in that “those who know more have more a responsibility”, and need to be careful not to lead others to sin.
The reality is, there is a lot of violence in the name of Islam, and few in this country with the guts to denounce it. While I’m all for freedom of religon, I’m certainly not for “special treatment” of certain religious groups. We all know of situations were “because it involved Islam”, we “let it go.” That essentially is the essense of terrorism, “scaring people into submission.”
Maybe that’s the message that needs to be addresses: this country needs to treat ALL religions equally, with of course, a clear distance from any theocracy.
Maybe the pastor in Fl is simply a nutcase who needs attention, but maybe not. Even though violence is not the means to do it, perhaps he is trying to send the message I just described.
For the life of me I have never understood why most of us play into political correctess, which is nothing more than disguised communism.
Just yesterday I read that Muslim prayer is going to be prayed in some public office, making my point that inch by inch, we are allowing a theocracy to slowly develop in this country. Why is Muslim prayer allowed but Christian pray not allowed?
THAT’S our problem, so I don’t know why it’s a big national debate or suprise when we see things like the Quran burning in FL.
For the record, I am 100% AGAINST THE BURNING OF THE QURAN.



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RomCath

posted September 9, 2010 at 12:04 pm


I think there has been plenty of outrage expressed concerning the atrocities perpetrated by extremists in the name of the Muslim religion. However the burning of a book sacred to them will do nothing to further any hope of ever calming things down but will only serve to fuel the fires of hate. It will make things a lot worse than they already are.



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Mike

posted September 9, 2010 at 12:32 pm


As a vet, who stood up when they burned my flag? Nobody! Would we be as outraged if they burned a Bible at Easter? I think not. It is about time someone did something in this country even to this extent. I agree with Klaire and most of the others. This country can not go on just hiding our heads in the sand. The next step is to go back to speeking English again. That should start a real fight.



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jj

posted September 9, 2010 at 12:33 pm


How quickly we forget the travesties committed in the name of and still being committed under the auspices of Christianity all across the world and in our very own backyards from the times of medieval torture through modernity. It makes me cringe everytime I hear the whole ‘founding fathers’ logic- hello (!) The very fact that there could be no founding mothers due to the deliberate denial of women even being “allowed” the right to own property, let alone vote, get an education or hold political office makes the “founding fathers” words laughable- unfortunately. Slavery, genocide against the Indigenous Nations by our very own Presidents- this- unfortunately, is the true founding of our country- again all deliberately woven through the tapestry of Christianity in virtually every faucet.
We had a modern-day opportunity to come together regardless of ethinicity, religion, etc. post September 11th and so many visions of that were so beautiful. Unfortunately, what has now come of this horrifically unifying event? More hatred against an “other” which is exactly what the handful of people (not Irag or any other nation) that committed September 11th ultimately desired. We actually have fulfilled their wishes possibly beyond their wildest dreams!
Before casting stones shouldn’t we (Christians) look at our own storied pasts and how we would not want to be associated with the atrocities of of very own country’s founding?



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Klaire

posted September 9, 2010 at 12:35 pm


RC there might be “outrage expressed”, but it’s hard to deny that most of us tip toe around “All things Muslim.”
I do agree that the buring of the Quran is NOT the solution, and will have great consequences. My point is that if we would get better at standing up to the smaller things, we not be seeing such extreme things as we are seeing in FL.



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Mark

posted September 9, 2010 at 12:52 pm


Like many acts, the intention of burning a Qu’ran – or a flag – is very important.
An old flag which is no longer in condition to be flown is supposed to be disposed of by private, respectful burning. A military unit about to be captured is supposed to respectfully “burn the colors” to prevent their capture by the enemy.
Copies of heretical works have been burned throughout the centuries, and the Qu’ran is certainly such. However, this is not the point of Pastor Jones; his point is an attack upon the honest (albeit misguided) beliefs of Muslims, and his choice of date makes it clear that his intention is to attack them spiritually in revenge of the attacks of 9/11/2001.
One cannot win the hearts of people by ripping away or attacking that which is close to their hearts, however toxic, but by showing them that which is better, and thus influencing them to voluntarily give up their erroneous ways.
We as Christians constantly criticize the tactics of Islamic states in disparaging the rights of beliefs of Christians. Are we now to stoop to such tactics ourselves, in flagrant violation of the Second Great Commandment?



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Deacon Greg Kandra

posted September 9, 2010 at 2:04 pm


Ladies and gentlemen:
Think.
Think of how the images of that burning will be used throughout the Islamic world.
Think of the innocent Americans and Christians — perhaps even some of those who are reading this — who may be targeted and even slaughtered in retribution for this ill-considered act of provocation.
Think of the unknown terror cells which now lie hidden in this country.
Think of the deplorable acts of violence those cells could launch because of this brazen and aggressively insulting gesture.
This is not akin to burning the flag — which, for all its meaning, is merely a symbol. This is closer in spirit to desecrating the Eucharist, something which devout believers hold to be sacred.
And, think of this: the parties who will be most offended by this are not known to turn the other cheek. They embrace suicide as a means to sanctification and justification.
Quran-burning is indeed — in the words of the Vatican — “outrageous” and “grave.”
That the pastor involved here doesn’t see that, and thinks nothing of the danger inherent in this act, is beyond tragic. He is striking at the heart of the beliefs of a billion people. Whether or not one agrees with those beliefs, what he is undertaking is hateful in the extreme.
Pray for him. And pray that this stunt doesn’t happen.
Dcn. G.



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romancrusader

posted September 9, 2010 at 2:11 pm


Alright,
First off, we do not attack a religious community. It’s just wrong. You don’t trigger an unsafe situation for innocent people who are going to get caught in the middle of this rash judgment by the Reverend and the rash response from the Muslim side. You may never abuse freedom. Any use of freedom of speech that fuels hatred is an abuse of that freedom. Freedom of speech is a means to an end, but that end must always be the perfection of love, not the exarcerbation of fear, hatred, misunderstanding and political conflicts. To use one’s freedom, knowing the horrible consequences that can happen and knowing that such use is a violation of another person’s faith is morally wrong. We do not win souls over to Christ by bully tactics.



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romancrusader

posted September 9, 2010 at 2:14 pm


P.S.
What Pope John Paul II, Blessed Mother Theresa, or St. Francis of Assisi say if they saw all this? They’d be turning their heads in disgust and shame. The ends doesn’t justify the means.



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romancrusader

posted September 9, 2010 at 2:17 pm


Also,
We must always be very careful not to invoke the victim card and say, “They have to live with the nasty on our part, because they were nasty to us before.” That’s just a revival of “an eye for an eye.” That is one of those laws laws about which St. Paul was speaking under the umbrella of “the old law.” It is no longer permissible for Christians to subscribe to that law. The Reverend knows better than this.



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MrsSmith

posted September 9, 2010 at 3:55 pm


If I do something that angers someone else, even knowing it will anger them, is it my fault if they respond with violence?
If someone immerses the cross of my Savior in urine, or burns the flag of my country, am I at fault if I respond with violence? Or am I permitted to be violent when someone provokes me?
Why the double standard? WHO, exactly, is at fault when Muslim followers turn to violence?
We constantly hear the mantra that Islam is a religion of peace. Is it only a religion of peace when the entire world bows to their every threat?



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Pastor B

posted September 9, 2010 at 6:28 pm


In all the articles I read about this, there was a faint appeal to what is “decent”. But the main concern was Muslim retaliation. Think about this, when the US military burned Bibles belonging to American soldiers serving in Afghanistan, there was no outcry.1 Why is that? It is because the Bible teaches that Christians are to be peaceful whenever possible. But the Quran on the other hand, teaches violence.
* The Qur’an tells Muslims to kill and go to war to fight for Islam: Surah 2:191; 2:193; 3:118; 4:75,76; 5:33, 8:12; 8:65; 9:5; 9:73,123; 33:60-62.
* Fight for Allah: “And kill them wherever you find them, and drive them out from whence they drove you out, and persecution is severer than slaughter, and do not fight with them at the Sacred Mosque until they fight with you in it, but if they do fight you, then slay them; such is the recompense of the unbelievers” (Quran 2:191).
* Muslims are to battle for Allah: “Those who believe do battle for the cause of Allah; and those who disbelieve do battle for the cause of idols. So fight the minions of the devil. Lo! the devil’s strategy is ever weak” (Quran 4:76).
* Kill those against Islam: “The only reward of those who make war upon Allah and His messenger and strive after corruption in the land will be that they will be killed or crucified, or have their hands and feet on alternate sides cut off, or will be expelled out of the land. Such will be their degradation in the world, and in the Hereafter” (Quran 5:33).
* Beheading: “When thy Lord inspired the angels, (saying): I am with you. So make those who believe stand firm. I will throw fear into the hearts of those who disbelieve. Then smite the necks and smite of them each finger. 13That is because they opposed Allah and His messenger. Whoso opposeth Allah and His messenger, (for him) lo! Allah is severe in punishment” (Quran 8:12).
* Slay non-Muslims: “Then, when the sacred months have passed, slay the idolaters wherever ye find them, and take them (captive), and besiege them, and prepare for them each ambush. But if they repent and establish worship and pay the poor-due, then leave their way free. Lo! Allah is Forgiving, Merciful” (Quran 9:5).
* Allah urges war: “O Prophet! strive hard against the unbelievers and the hypocrites and be unyielding to them; and their abode is hell, and evil is the destination” (Quran 9:73).
* Allah urges war: “O you who believe! fight those of the unbelievers who are near to you and let them find in you hardness; and know that Allah is with those who guard (against evil)” (Quran 9:123).
* Allah urges killing: “…the hypocrites and those in whose hearts is a disease and the agitators in the city do not desist… 61Cursed: wherever they are found they shall be seized and murdered, a (horrible) murdering. 62(Such has been) the course of Allah with respect to those who have gone before; and you shall not find any change in the course of Allah” (Quran 33:60-62).
* Allah loves those who fight for him. “Truly Allah loves those who fight in His Cause in battle array, as if they were a solid cemented structure” (Surah 61:4).
So, is the news media around the world concerned about burning the Quran based on morality, religious truth, and tolerance? Or, is it because the world is very familiar with the violent nature of Islam? Consider these quotes:
1. “A spokesman for the Taliban in Afghanistan tells CNN: “If in Florida they were to burn the Quran, we will target any Christians, even if they are innocent, because the Quran is our holy book and we do not want someone to burnour holy book.”2
2. Petraeus spoke Wednesday with Afghan President Karzai about the matter, according to a military spokesman Col. Erik Gunhus. “They both agreed that burning of a Quran would undermine our effort in Afghanistan, jeopardize the safety of coalition troopers and civilians,” Gunhus said, and would “create problems for our Afghan partners . . . as it likely would be Afghan police and soldiers who would have to deal with any large demonstrations.”3
3. It is the duty of Muslims to react,” said Mohammad Mukhtar, a cleric and candidate for the Afghan parliament in the Sept. 18 election. “When their holy book Quran gets burned in public, then there is nothing left. If this happens, I think the first and most important reaction will be that wherever Americans are seen, they will be killed. No matter where they will be in the world they will be killed.”4
Only time will tell to what extent the violence, if any, is perpetrated by Muslims upon Christians all over the world for something they have not done or may even disapprove of. But the Muslim threats before and the unfortunate retaliations after the Quran burning should be a very strong warning to all of us that at the heart of Islam is a violent, highly intolerant, bigoted5 religious system.
I must ask. Will the Muslims in their Islamic countries decry the burning of the Bible when it happens? Of course not. If Muslims burned the Bible in Iran, Saudi Arabia, or any other Muslim dominated country, would Christians who happen to live there be safe in protesting? Hardly. The hypocrisy and incredible bigotry of the Islamic world is obvious to all who don’t hide behind political correctness.
We do not want to see anyone injured. We believe that peace is a better way to persuade than violence. But we believe this because this is what the Bible teaches us, in particular in the New Testament. This is why Muslims want Christian-based freedoms for them while they are in United States. It makes it easier for them to exist, to spread Islam, and then when they are strong enough, to start making demands. But, would anyone expect those same Muslims to work for equal freedoms for Christians in their Muslim dominated societies? I for one would expect hell to freeze over before such an event ever took place.
Is Islam a good religion? No it is not. It seeks the domination of the world and the imposition of Sharia Law. It cannot stand in harmony with the United States Constitution and it seeks to destroy all political and social systems not in agreement with Quranic principles.
I am not sure about the wisdom of burning the Quran, but I wholeheartedly agree with the right to express religious freedom in so doing it the same as I would support the right of an individual or to burn the Bible, though I think doing so is morally reprehensible.
Finally, there is at least one good thing resulting from this whole incident dealing with burning the Quran. It is that more and more people are being made aware, yet again, of the violent and intolerant nature of Islam.



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Civitas Occiduus

posted September 9, 2010 at 6:34 pm


I think most of the comments have pretty much exhausted this issue, but MrsSmith raises a point worth addressing:
“If I do something that angers someone else, even knowing it will anger them, is it my fault if they respond with violence?”
Well, yes, since you state that you knew that your action would provoke that anger. Wrath is a sin and if you make a point of pushing someone else into it, you are responsible.
Are they responsible for their anger as well? Yes. We do not operate in a vacuum that permits us to casually dismiss how our actions affect other people, nor do we live in a universe devoid of personal responsibility where our faults can be blamed on someone else.
But if my friend were an alcoholic and I brought alcohol for myself into his home and my friend, thus tempted, drank it, I abetted his sin. “But the alcohol was for me!” I might protest. Yes, but part of loving one another is supporting one another along our pilgrimige to God. If one knows that one’s act of burning the Quran (even if somehow deemed a service to God’s Truth) would cause Muslims to take leave of their senses and engage in horrific & sinful acts of violence, then here’s a thought: don’t do it.
MrsSmith, your reference to the various blasphemies and sacreligious acts above is poignant and I, too, know the anger that comes from such things. I also know the hurt and pain of 9/11, as all Americans do. But this world is passing. We can react to the temporary (albeit horrific) evils of this life, or we can gird our loins with God’s love and choose not to let the actions of sad people control us.
Being a Christian means being an authentic, mature human being — indeed, it means being an “adult” in the truest sense of the word. Children hold grudges, seek to get even, and cry foul when other people insult them; adults keep their eyes focused on the prize of eternity, realize that the symbols of this life are ultimately dust, and understand when others — such as the thousands who are promising to kill Americans over a book burning — are inhabiting an unending childhood. Adults do not argue with children and they certainly don’t provoke or insult them. The playground arguments over theology are as immature as punching a girl that one likes; let’s leave the Muslims alone, ignore them or “turn the other cheek” when they do sad, meaningless things that only truly hurt their own souls, and stay focused on the victory wreath promised those who “run the race” by St. Paul.



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Donald Ellis

posted September 9, 2010 at 6:52 pm


Anyone can buy a Koran. Open it up and read any 50 pages.
Then you will know what Islam has in store for you.
You can accept Islam and live under the law of Sharia or reject it
and have every thing stripped from you, and have your head cut off.
Or you can buy a temporary stay and live as a dhimmi.
If you can find anything peace loving about that, you are a better
Christian than I or a damned fool.



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Deacon John M. Bresnahan

posted September 9, 2010 at 6:52 pm


I agree with those who say the minister should not be burning Korans. But where were all these voices in the media and elsewhere when our tax money was used to dob the Blessed Virgin in feces and give our Crucified Lord a piss bath.
Apparently all the brouhaha has nothing to do with respect for religion, but all to do with fear of Islamic violence. And does that make us cowards or just prudent??? Also, maybe now is the time to demand loud and clear that the media stop trashing Christianity and Catholicism.



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Marie

posted September 9, 2010 at 8:20 pm


I am tired of pussy-footing around with the Islam world–whose religion claims that if you are Muslim and try to convert gives you permission to kill your children. Freedom is not a choice. When I hear that there are 1.whatever Muslims in the world, it only tells me that there are 1.whatever cowards in the world! Stand up now–tell the imans, you aren’t about to listen to this crap.
This religion amazes me. It’s a religion that says you are either with us, or we will kill you–oh–by they way, tell everyone that this is a religion of peace, and once we get a foot hold in, we can castigate people, especially in democratic countries by appealing to their free democracies.
I was just thinking? What would happen if on 9/11 thousands of mosques went up in flames around the world, instead of the International Burn the Koran?



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Panthera

posted September 9, 2010 at 8:23 pm


When I see the paranoia flowing through many of the comments – as if Christians were one step away from the lions – it feels, to me, as if the genuine sacrifices of the real Christian martyrs are debased.
I am attacked verbally and discriminated against legally every day in the US – exclusively by a sub-group of Christians.
Yet not once, not even in my extensive travels in the Islamic world (a religion I very much do not care for) nor in the Arabic cultures (which I despise), have I ever been even mildly reproved for my Christian faith.
Not once.
All those Christians (I use the term broadly) calling for the burning of that book should reflect upon the consequences for all gays of a very small subset of idiots perpetrating outrages on symbols of the Catholic church – the rest of us are routinely accosted for it and the most horrendous violations of our civil rights justified for those actions.
There will be retaliations for this. In fact, I am beginning to think that these people are doing it purposefully in an heretical attempt to trigger the second coming.



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Marie

posted September 9, 2010 at 8:44 pm


Oh……by the way, I do not believe in any religion, so if you try to hook your wagon on any specific; you’ll be very hard pressed.
I guess if I had any role models it would be the historian Thomas Paine, who also seen religion as being a stumbling block. Unfortunately for him, he never seen civilization rejecting it in his life-time. (I cringe everytime I view how many religious channels are still on TV) I don’t have term for myself–and what I believe is not responsible for thousands of deaths by association.



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Marie

posted September 9, 2010 at 10:07 pm


Many in the USA believe our constitutional rights are at stake by not being able to burn the Koran. I think our current president makes a big mistake by blocking this; what if it escalates into something worse like the destruction of every mosque at a given time. I think it is time we stopped giving in to the muslim world with a “we’ll do this, if you don’t do that.” attitude, do they really think us that weak?
What if we destroyed every American mosque in a single moment?
Do you think the world (Russia, China, France, England, The Netherlands) would be surprised? Do you think they would follow suit?
I hope you print this, and I hope that little preacher continues on with his flag burning, and hope our president makes his plee but makes no inroads.
As I mentioned before I am a follower of Thomas Paine, and he didn’t have much store for religion. Especially those of the prophet Mohammed.



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Mike Hanson

posted September 9, 2010 at 10:45 pm


Whether by intent or not, the pastor’s proposed Koran-burning highlights the double standard and hypocracy of the Islamic world.
Who does not remember the expressions of glee in the Arab world when the atrocities of 9/11 took place? Who does not remember the arab masses dancing in the streets and celebrating? Who has not read of mouth-foaming threats to those who chose to leave Islam? Who is not aware of the daily acts of brutality done in the name of Islam that appear with dreary regularity on the news?
When the countries of Muslim majority begin to respect the right of all peaceful religions to preach, practice and proselyte their beliefs, then we may perhaps take their protestations of being a civilized creed seriously. Until then we must be forced to consider Islam as an enemy, either actual or potential.



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Meena

posted September 9, 2010 at 11:24 pm


This whole burning of the Quran is bogus. How can a pastor (I even feel disgusted typing in that title for him) be a representative of the church when he is bashing other religions. Muslims are taught to respect other religions, that’s why you don’t see us going around making a “Burn the Bible Day’.
It literally amazes me also that there are people here who comment on things like this when they aren’t involved what so ever. This is going to turn into a big issue because of people like that. People who don’t come from the religion but feel the need to mock it or ridicule it based on the limited information they have. And what baffles me even more is that these arrogant people feel the need to preach what they think is right to everyone around them, hence getting more people involved.
This ‘pastor’ only did this to get a reaction out of people. So some Muslim who doesn’t know any better reacts. And of course they would. If I made a “burn the bible day’ I’m pretty sure I would get a substantial amount of reactions too. Religion is a very touchy topic. And there are so many in the world. If we dont learn to live together peacefully, despite our differences, then we truly are doomed and hideous race.



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Jules

posted September 10, 2010 at 4:38 pm


There are many people posting here and on this site that identify as Christians, but as a Christian, I don’t understand their viewpoints. I don’t say that judgementally; I’m just confused. As Christians, we are called to share the Gospel of Jesus Christ with others; we are called to love and pray for others including those who disagree with us and even those who hate us. Burning Qurans will not win souls for Christ and does not represent the spirit of Christ. Christians should not be living their lives under a spirit of fear, but of power, love and sound mind.



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managodjon

posted September 22, 2010 at 9:03 pm


I want to burn the Quran also, because of the passion that is within me towards Christ, thats just the human part of me. But the spirit thats in me tells me to be obediant to the word of GOD, even if the book descibes my Lord and saviour to be only some regular O’ prophet.



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Bill

posted September 27, 2010 at 12:15 pm


Seems to me Jesus incited anger and hate among the religious. It’s why he was murdered by them. Anyway, If Jesus avoided saying things he knew would make these ultra religious Jews angry… how is he doing what your article mentions? He purposely incited their anger because he needed them to kill him. Maybe Christians should do the same so other religions know what they really believe. I mean, don’t Christians in general believe everyone who does not have Christian faith will be sent to Hell?
No matter how you say it, thinking that every religion but yours is false, and everyone who fails to believe as you, will go to hell is offensive. One can smile and act kind all they want, but in the end the damage is done. There really isn’t a choice born out of love if the only other option is eternal damnation as believed by Christians.
The Bible and probably other religious texts say contrary things at times. I’ve read it so many times and can’t understand why people think it is a pillar of moral truth and wisdom. Sure, there are some wise sayings, but many more extreme forms of justice and injustice attributed to God and his chosen people. I just don’t get why people love this book, or call it a book of love. I bet ancient Egypt’s murdered firstborn and their parents would dispute modern Christian claims of a loving god, so would Jerico, or everyone who died in the supposed flood. How many pregnant women have been murdered in the name of God in the Old Testament? If you read the book, one finds such things a common response resulting from God’s wrath.
Cheers



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Bill

posted September 30, 2010 at 12:54 am


Bill,
for a non-Christian, you have some admirable wisdom. :)
Jesus’ words to the Pharisees were very offensive. The disciples and apostles also said some things that were deemed offensive, which is why they were often arrested, persecuted, and even put to death. And what was so offensive was that they spoke the truth. The truth is oftentimes offensive, no matter how nicely you try to word it.
Burning the Koran is not only offensive but it is an outward display of ones total rejection of a satanic piece of literature. It is a book that represents the beliefs that murderous mujahideen around the world hold dear.
Sometimes doing what is necessary is not pleasant. And it is necessary to show the world the terrible double-standard shown by our own government, by other governments around the world, and the Islamic community in general. It is necessary to show the erosion of our freedom of expression: there can be no real freedom when there is fear of persecution… And how many folks have been forced into anonymity because of some silly cartoons, or a short film, or some statements they’ve made? Molly Norris comes to mind…
Let’s not sacrifice our freedom and our children’s freedom on the altar of some self-righteous concept of “tolerance.” To do so displays one heck of an ungrateful attitude towards the blessings God has bestowed on America.



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DyspepticJesuit

posted September 30, 2010 at 3:49 am


Oh, I don’t think burning the book of a
—necrophiliac (“I (Muhammad) put on her my shirt that she may wear the clothes of heaven, and I slept with her in her coffin (grave) that I may lessen the pressure of the grave.” source: Ibn ‘Abbas);
—child molester (the marriage at 6 years old to ‘Ǟʾisha bint Abu Bakr followed by rape at age 9);
—rapist of captive women;
—slave trader (Arabic is racist even in its words for slave: “zanj” for black slaves, “‘abd” for white ones);
—general run-of-the-mill murderer
is as bad as, say, burning a Bible (which draws no attention). The Christian Bible is God’s revealed Word through inspired authors, whereas Muhammad was just—ahem—a mere man. Muslims don’t even care much where he is buried; a books store is believed to occupy the land above his final resting place.
The Qur’ān (memorize this transliteration, ye PC robots) is no more holy than a phone book. Get over it.



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