The Bliss Blog

The Bliss Blog


Thursday-Personal Bliss

 

As I was driving home from work today, I was listening to an NPR interview with Rosanne Cash whose book entitled “Composed” is newly released. I have long enjoyed her music and that of her prolific parents Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash. I was particularly touched by a description of a traumatic incident she witnessed. In the 8 month of her pregnancy, she wanted to protect her in utero little one by calming herself so as not to allow stress hormones to invade her body. She said that she was “borrowing from her future”, in essence seeing herself and her child healthy and strong (my interpretation) and having moved beyond the here and now. It sparked in me an appreciation for all of the times that I have been able to walk through otherwise fear-filled situations by tapping into a past or future ‘self’ and having a conversation with that aspect of me that either needed the guidance of the wiser, more mature Edie or was calling on the me ‘yet to be’ who had lived what I had not yet. In either case, I recognized the inherent gift of knowing that I had survived everything that had ever happened in my life, because I was here to tell about it.

In what ways have you been able to integrate the various aspects of yourself who have lived through joys and sorrows and allowed him or her to be your teacher and guide?



  • Molly

    This question almost makes sense to me, can you say it in another way? I can feel a great answer lurking….

  • http://www.liveinjoy.org Edie Weinstein

    Molly:
    Thank you for your comment. Another way of asking the question….since I sense that ‘we contain multitudes’ and there are different roles we play at different ages, how can I/we learn from them? The ‘me’ that I was in my 20’s has alot to teach the 51 year old that I am today and the ‘future me’ that I will be in 10 years, can ‘reach back’ and offer wisdom that will serve me now.
    Does that clarify it for you?

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posted 10:17:06am Jan. 26, 2015 | read full post »

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Thursday: Personal Bliss

 

 

T   Throughout my life, there have been so many experiences that reflect bliss. One that comes to mind at the moment is my 50th birthday. Dear friends hosted a party in their lovely home. Kindred spirits from up and down the East coast gathered to celebrate with me. 50 felt like such a huge milestone, that marked a turning point. Unlike many people, I actually felt a sense of satisfaction when I received my invitation to AARP. It meant I had ‘arrived’ into mature adulthood, while still maintaining a sense of the playful child. On this particular mid October evening, after a sumptuous pot luck dinner, I found myself sitting on the floor, with my legs in front of me, like the delighted 5 year old that had overtaken my body. One after the other, my friends regaled me with stories of how we met and what our connection meant to them. Laughing, crying, feeling deeply loved. I wish I had thought to audio or videotape it, but the memory of it remains with me in my heart.

 

 



Previous Posts

The Gift of Vulnerability
A quote from one of my favorite books has set the stage for an ongoing process in my life. The Velveteen Rabbit is a tale of a little boy whose toys dispense wisdom to each other,  the child and the reader of this classic. The rabbit, who is a bit insecure and wondering if the tot will favor him, a

posted 10:17:06am Jan. 26, 2015 | read full post »

On the Elevator
  Yesterday I received a surprise in the mail. It was a tiny pocket sized book called Back To Joy that was compiled by author June Cotner. It contains tidbits of wisdom from the likes of Anne Lamott, John Welwood, Winston Churchill, Helen Keller, Rachel Carson, Og Mandino and someone else wh

posted 9:26:51pm Jan. 24, 2015 | read full post »

Wabi Sabi Walls
    The Japanese concept of Wabi Sabi is defined in Wikipedia as: " A comprehensive  Japanese world view or aesthetic centered on the acceptance of transience and imperfection. The aesthetic is sometimes described as one of beauty that is "imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete".

posted 9:31:09pm Jan. 23, 2015 | read full post »

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As I was speaking with a client today, we were discussing ways that people learn who they are and how they re-create themselves when major life changes occur. I remembered a scene from one of my favorite films:  Joe vs. the Volcano. Tom Hanks plays Joe Banks who  has a dreary, gray life, with pre

posted 10:22:22pm Jan. 21, 2015 | read full post »

Changing Your Mind About God
I was listening to an  NPR interview today with author Scott Chesire whose initial book  is called High As the Horses’ Bridles, which is a reference to an image connected with Armageddon. It is a novel, but in part, is based on his own experience as a Jehovah's Witness. In his conversation

posted 10:18:52pm Jan. 19, 2015 | read full post »




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