Astrological Musings

Few topics are as hotly disputed among astrologers as the question of whether the “void of course” moon has an effect on our daily lives. Early in my career I carefully watched for the void of course moon but found no correlation and no effect. That doesn’t necessarily mean that there is none, because different cycles affect people differently and typically people who are more “lunar” in nature experience the moon’s vagaries more personally. But I have always looked at the void moon as one more thing to plant fear in the hearts of astrology students. (The “void-of-course” moon occurs after the moon makes its last major aspect to another planet before changing signs. )

So I was happy to see this article from Dana Gerhardt, one of astrology’s noted moon experts who I have always admired, entitled “Don’t be frightened of void of course moons.” Dana writes:

Sometimes astrology is scary. You might have blissfully spent all your days unaware of void-of-course moons, but once you hear about them, you’re panicky. The news about void-of-course moons does sound hopeless. Anything begun them goes nowhere. Your job interview won’t bring employment. Your visit to your mother-in-law won’t earn any goodwill. Convene a business meeting and all plans made then will fall apart later. . . .

The logic behind this divination is more symbolic than literal. It does not presume that everyone travels the same celestial assembly line, passing through good and bad times all at once. Not all of the hundred thousand letters mailed during a void-of-course moon will fly from the postman’s hands and land in a trash dumpster. But if you begin a project on such a moon and later find your work faltering, the symbolism of the void can be helpful. Know that you’ll have to supply the extra oomph to make things happen yourself. I once left a resume at an employment office just minutes before the moon went void of course. When days passed and they didn’t call me for an interview, I called them. The woman on the other end of the phone was surprised. “I don’t know why we didn’t call you. You look like an excellent candidate. Let me set up an interview with you now.” I eventually got the job, so the void didn’t doom me.

It’s best to rest on a void moon. People often feel sleep and disconnected at this time. I find these are wonderful hours to simply drift if you can. This creates a space—into which surprising and inspired ideas can suddenly enter. Void moons are also good for doing activities that you don’t want to hear further results from. It’s said that if you mail your taxes at this time, you won’t be audited. One of my clients scheduled a medical test for a void moon, and the result was exactly what she was hoping for: negative. (She was especially relieved because a month earlier, the same test had a scary positive result.) But if you have no choice and you must schedule something important on a void moon, know that you can still be successful, especially if you’re willing to apply a little personal chutzpah. Void moon ripen your individuality and favor creative breakthroughs. This is an optimum time to cut loose from the prevailing wisdom and sneak past the cultural gates. Even a failed project can bring such brilliant learning, your future will shimmer because of it.

Being moon paranoid is silly. Good or bad moons are mostly what we make of them. A void of course moon may not signal anything at all, particularly if you stand at no brinks, ready for no action. In that case, you’ve got a perfect astrological excuse to do nothing. If you want to drift and dream, go for it on the lunar void. Stepping out of the game can be wonderful from time to time. It’s all up to you!

You might find it useful to experiment yourself with the void moon to see whether it has an effect in your own life. Astrologer Felissa Rose has kindly provided us with online tables to help with this project. Meanwhile, what have you experienced in your own life with the void moon, or for the astrologers out there, what has been your experience with clients?

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