Pranic Breathing: The Key to Both Relaxation and Energy

Slow, rhythmic pranic breathing is the key that unlocks the peace within you.

BY: Master Stephen Co

 

Continued from page 1

In Yoga and Pranayama, Breath Control = Life Control

In yogic thinking, life is measured not according to the number of years lived but according to the number of breaths taken in that lifetime. This gives us a better understanding of why yoga places so much emphasis on slowing down and on controlling or holding the breath. In yoga, the formal practice of breath control is called pranayama, which, as noted earlier, is derived from the words prana (“life force” or “breath”) and ayama (“length” or “expansion”). Of course, this is also an extension of yogic philosophy’s understanding of the connection between breathing, energy, health, and well-being. In increasing the length of the breath and the number of breaths taken, as well as holding the breath in certain ways, the yoga practitioner calms the mind, generates more prana, and increases his or her lifespan.

Exercise 3.4 Optimum Pranic Breathing Rhythm and Retention: 7-1-7-1

There are many different systems that teach breathing rhythm as a method of increasing energy or promoting relaxation. The 7-1-7-1 taught in Pranic Healing and Arhatic Yoga was determined through clairvoy¬ant observation to be the optimum for those starting out their breathing practice. It’s easy to remember and thus practice. But it also produces a significant amount of energy.
(Note: If you have hypertension, don’t hold your breath longer than one second. Pranic breathing stimulates all the chakras, and especially the navel and the meng mein. The meng mein controls the blood pres¬sure, and if you hold your breath too long, it could unsafely increase your blood pressure.)

  1. Put your tongue on your palate and keep it there as you breathe. 
  2. Inhale for 7 counts, in the pranic breathing manner you learned in exercise 3.1. 
  3. Hold for 1 count. 
  4. Exhale for 7 counts. 
  5. Hold for 1 count.

This five-step process is one cycle of pranic breathing. At the outset of your practice, try to do two or three sets of ten cycles daily. Take a minute or two between sets initially; then shorten the length of your rest time as you progress. With practice, you won’t need to consciously count off the rhythm in your mind. You can begin by using one second per count; however, the length of the counts is not as important as main¬taining the ratio and the steady pace. As you progress, you may find that your heartbeat is an effective pacing mechanism, too. If you’re prone to anxiety, this will also help you reduce your heart rate.

Master Stephen CoMaster Co is co-author with Eric Robins, M.D. of the new book The Power of Prana: Breathe Your Way to Health and Vitality (July 2011). Master Co is a Certified Pranic Energy Healer and has taught energy healing and vitality-boosting techniques to thousands of people in North America, Europe and Asia.Author Bio: Master Co is a Certified Pranic Energy Healer and has taught energy healing and vitality-boosting techniques to thousands of people in North America, Europe and Asia.

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