Presidential Candidates on Religion

An ongoing record of the Democratic presidential hopefuls' comments on religion and spirituality

Continued from page 1

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Interview with Beliefnet, November 2003

On What He Considers Himself

"I'm spiritual. I'm religious. I'm a strong Christian and I'm a Catholic but I go to a Presbyterian Church. Occasionally I go to the Catholic church too. I take communion. I haven't transferred my membership or anything. My wife I consider ourselves---she considers herself a Catholic."


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Interview with Beliefnet, November 2003

On Democrats & Religion

"But the Republican Party does not have the monopoly on faith in this country, and there are just as many Democrats who believe in religion, they go to church, they read the Bible, they say their prayers, they believe in God as there are Republicans. And I think that you'll see that in this next election."


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Nov. 24, 2003 candidate debate in Des Moines, Iowa

On Prayer

"And I certainly do. I do pray. I do believe in the good Lord. And he's been a very important influence in my life. And I'm not afraid to say that."


--Nov. 24, 2003 candidate debate in Des Moines, Iowa

On Faith & Caring for Others

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"If you're going to live your faith, you've got to take care of people. We're not just going to talk family values, we're going to help people live them."


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Baton Rouge, La. campaign event, Dec. 29, 2003

On Church & State

TOM BROKAW: General Clark, faith is a big component in South Carolina, and throughout the South, for that matter. There's been a big, big dispute down here about the display of the Ten Commandments on public property. Should there be, in your judgment, some kind of a compromise so people who believe in the Ten Commandments, or people of the Jewish faith who want to put something out there that reflects their faith, or the Islamic faith, on public property have the right to do that?



CLARK: Tom, I grew up in the South and I went to church every Sunday and I did all that and I can quote Scriptures and so forth. But, you know, I think that we need to preserve the separation of church and state. I think that kids in school should have the opportunity to pray voluntarily. But when I was a kid in school in Little Rock, we read the Bible and we prayed in home room every morning. And it never occurred to me that I had Jewish friends sitting right there. Now I think, "What must they have thought?"



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