Bless You!

It most certainly benefits us to be aware of all the blessings in our lives. The more we are aware of goodness and beauty and grace in our lives, the more goodness, beauty, and grace we will have.

Blessing. 

There are two meanings of the word.  One is a noun – as in “count your blessings.”  The other is a verb – the act of blessing, of wishing one well, of bestowing blessings upon someone.

It most certainly benefits us to be aware of all the blessings in our lives.  The more we are aware of goodness and beauty and grace in our lives, the more goodness, beauty, and grace we will have.  The very act of being conscious of Good in our lives tends to make us happy.

If you want, try this experiment.  Take a minute and think of all that is wrong in your life or all that is wrong in this world.  Just let yourself wallow in misery for a minute.  Think of your aches and pains, of your money woes, of someone who is ill.  Think of violence and pollution, crime and corruption.   Isn’t it awful?  Don’t you feel Bad?  Ugh!  Now take a deep breath and give yourself a minute to focus on all that is Good.  Think of all the people who have been kind to you.  Think of all that you have materially – a house, a car, a kitchen, indoor plumbing, a body which walks and talks and breathes.  Think of your family, your friends, the stranger who smiled at you.  Think of your pets and how your dog is so happy to see you at the end of the day.  Think of all the beauty of the Earth.  Think of the trees, the streams, the beautiful sky, the hummingbirds, the songbirds, a beautiful sunset.  Don’t you feel better?  Isn’t it infinitely better to focus on your blessings?

Advertisement

Now, let’s focus on the act of blessing.  Generally we tend to think of this as something a clergyperson does.  Or maybe a fairy godmother.  Or, if you’re very lucky, someone like my Aunt Ruth, who wasn’t an aunt at all but a dear old lady who lived downstairs from my grandmother.  She was plump with snow white hair gathered at the nape of her neck in a bun.  She was the quintessential sweet old lady.  When we, as a young family, would go to visit her, she would say to each of us children with a smile on her face, “Bless your little heart.”  What a sweet thing to say.

We can all learn to bestow blessings.  The world may not be ready for us to do this out loud.  But we can certainly do it silently.

Did you like this? Share with your family and friends.
Cynthia Greb
comments powered by Disqus
Related Topics: Christian, Faith

Advertisement

Advertisement

DiggDeliciousNewsvineRedditStumbleTechnoratiFacebook