The Fall Spice that Improves Your Health

Cinnamon, when used in moderation, is not only a delicious addition to apple pie or hot cider, it is also good for your health. Research shows that cinnamon can aid with a host of health problems from pain to Parkinson’s. Here are 5 reasons to spice things up this fall… with cinnamon.

BY: Danielle Hark

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Cinnamon, when used in moderation, is not only a delicious addition to apple pie or hot cider, it is also good for your health. Research shows that cinnamon can aid with a host of health problems from pain to Parkinson’s. Here are 5 reasons to spice things up this fall… with cinnamon.



Reduces Pain – Cinnamon is known to be a painkiller because it inhibits prostaglandin. It also has a high level of Manganese, which can build bones, blood and connective tissue. This can be especially helpful for people with chronic pain due to arthritis.



Regulates Blood Sugar & Fights Obesity – Studies show that cinnamon reduces the rate at which the stomach empties. This not only helps with weight, but it can normalize blood sugar levels in people with type II Diabetes and improve the body’s ability to respond to insulin.



Contains Minerals & Fiber – Cinnamon contains iron, which helps move oxygen through the body, and calcium, which is important for bone growth and maintenance. It also contains fiber, which helps your bowel health, lowers cholesterol, and aids in weight loss.



Lowers inflammation – A study from the University of Texas indicates that cinnamon can reduce chronic inflammation of tissues in the brain linked to neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, MS, and Alzheimer’s.



Helps Digestion – Cinnamon has been used in many cultures around the world to ease nausea, diarrhea, gas and bloating. It can kill bacteria and help heal infections in the GI tract. It can also aid in the digestion of dairy and fruit.



Final Note - Enjoy cinnamon, but sparingly. Use a sprinkling and not teaspoons. Before taking large amounts or supplements check with your doctor, especially if you are pregnant or taking diabetes medications because the combination can cause your glucose level to drop. Opt for the Ceylon variety over Cassia. The Cassia has higher levels of coumarin, which is an anticoagulant and can be bad for your liver when taken in large doses.



Danielle Hark is a wellness writer, photographer, and founder of BrokenLightCollective.com - the online photography gallery for people affected by mental illness. As someone who has struggled with mental health issues, her mission is to help as many other people who are struggling, using photography and creativity whenever possible. www.DanielleHark.com and twitter.com/DanielleHark.


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