Welcoming Sukkot

Hot on the heels of Yom Kippur, falls the next in a series of autumn Jewish holidays, Sukkot. After an entire month or more of soul searching, introspection, fasting, begging forgiveness, it’s time to party!

Passover

Hot on the heels of Yom Kippur, falls the next in a series of autumn Jewish holidays, Sukkot. It’s brilliant, really. After an entire month or more of soul searching, introspection, fasting, begging forgiveness, it’s time to party!

Sukkot is the autumn harvest festival—think cornucopias overflowing with pumpkins and gourds, colorful squash and Indian corn. In the Bible we’re told to celebrate for a week, dwelling in temporary booths or tabernacles (in Hebrew, called Sukkot), which is how Sukkot became known as “the Feast of Tabernacles” or “Feast of Booths” in some circles. In Jewish tradition it is called “z’mansimchateinu”—season of our joy—and it is!

Celebrating Sukkot can mean erecting a sukkah of your own, and many Jews do that. But the main ritual obligation of a Jew is to “leshevba’sukkah”—sit in the sukkah (or dwell in it). We do that to remember what it may have been like for our ancestors who while wandering the wilderness in the years between escaping Egyptian slavery and entering the promised land of Israel built temporary shelters. It’s also to recall the fall harvest in ancient times and the booths, in which the farmers slept during the harvest time. Sukkot is filled with symbols, metaphors and customs, some seemingly arcane and quaint, but which have meaning even for our time. They are worthwhile investigating even if you’re not especially observant of Jewish rituals.

Sukkah: The commandment says to sit (or dwell) in a sukkah. You could construct your own sukkah; it’s not difficult with many pre-fabs easily available online—a few interlocking pipes, tarps and lattice work and voila! Top the lattice with evergreen fronds (arbor vitae branches work well, as do palm fronds or corn stalks). Hang Indian corn, gourds, autumn garlands of tinsel and silk leaves. You can string New Year’s greeting cards and all other things decorative. If you have strands of lights and an outdoor outlet, you can have your sukkah lit nicely for the evening. Some hardy folk sleep in their sukkah. When my kids were little, they looked forward to taking their sleeping bags into the sukkah and camping out for the night. But living in the Midwest, it does tend to get chilly at night during October when the bulk of the festival usually resides, so be warned!

Advertisement

Hospitality: Of course, what’s the point of having a sukkah if you don’t invite friends to enjoy this season of our joy (and admire your beautifully appointed sukkah!)? It is traditional during sukkot to spread the hospitality. Hachansat orchim (welcoming guests) is an important aspect to the festival, so have a sukkah open house, or small dinner party, or just have friends and family over for a cup of coffee and cake. By inviting them to your sukkah, you can help them fulfill the commandment of sitting in the sukkah. But even if you don’t have a sukkah of your own, it’s a perfect time to practice this important value of hospitality and invite people over for a holiday (or Shabbat meal).

Did you like this? Share with your family and friends.
Barbara Barnett
comments powered by Disqus
Related Topics: Jewish

Advertisement

Advertisement

DiggDeliciousNewsvineRedditStumbleTechnoratiFacebook