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If only both peoples would renounce violence: Dayenu.
If only both peoples would talk to one another: Dayenu.
If only both peoples would recognize each other's rights: Dayenu.
If only they would appreciate each other's culture: Dayenu.
If only they would recognize their common origin and destiny: Dayenu.
If only the descendants of Isaac and Ishmael could live face to face: Dayenu.
If only they could beat their swords into plowshares: Dayenu.
If only both people could share the land: Dayenu.
There are possibilities for peace. The rest of the seder will explore them.

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"The Gates of Freedom Haggadah"

Had we been brought out of Egypt and not been supported in the wilderness, it would have been enough.
Had we been supported in the wilderness and not been given the Sabbath, it would have been enough.
Had we been given the Sabbath and not been given the Torah, it would have been enough.
Had we been given the Torah and not been brought to the land of Israel, it would have been enough.
Had we been brought to the land of Israel and not been sent the prophets, it would have been enough.
Had we been sent the prophets and not been called to be a light to the nations, it would have been enough.
Had we been called to be a light to the nations and not been sustained wherever we have dwelt, it would have been enough.
Had we been sustained wherever we have dwelt and not been returned to the land of our ancestors, it would have been enough.
Had we been returned to the land of our ancestors and not been summoned to perfect this world, it would have been enough.

If we were delivered from bondage while others remained enslaved, could we say "Dayenu"?
If we could be at peace while others died in wars, could we say "Dayenu"?
If we were born to prosper while others were born to weep, could we say "Dayenu"?
If we alone where chosen while others were forgotten, could we say "Dayenu"?
And if we have enough to eat while others starve, can we say "Dayenu"?
And if our houses are safe while others live in fear, can we say "Dayenu"?
And if we have a land to live on while others are far from home, can we say "Dayenu"?

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"Next Year in Lhasa: Seders for Tibet"

After a traditional rendition of "Dayenus, this Haggadah adds the following:
Reader: What does this mean, "It would have been enough?" Surely no single of these would have been enough. It means to celebrate each step toward freedom as if it were enough, then to start out on the next step. It means that if we reject each step because it is not the whole liberation, we will never be able to achieve the whole liberation. It means to sing each verse as if it were the whole song--and then to sing the next verse!

Reader: It's really a wonder that I haven't dropped all my ideals, because they seem so absurd and impossible to carry out. Yet I keep them, because in spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart. I simply can't build my hopes on a foundation consisting of confusion, misery, and death. I see the world gradually being turned into a wilderness. I hear the ever-approaching thunder, which will destroy us too. I can feel the sufferings of millions, and yet if I look up into the heavens, I think it will all come right, that this cruelty too will end, and that peace and tranquility will return again.In the meantime, I must uphold my ideals, for perhaps the time will come when I shall be able to carry them out. (Anne Frank, "The Diary of Anne Frank")

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"The Anonymous Haggadah" (for Twelve Step programs)

Dayenu does not mean it would have been enough. Rather, it would have been more than we deserved.

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