How Does a Crusade Work?

From organizing to counseling to follow-up, all the steps for staging a crusade.

BY: Billy Graham Evangelistic Association

 
ORGANIZING A CRUSADE

Every evangelistic crusade conducted by Mr. Graham is the result of a cooperative effort involving the evangelist, his team, and many local Christians and churches. He is invited by clergy and laity who have banded together because of the common desire to reach their community with the Christian message.

The invitations are evaluated by Mr. Graham with his team. Each one is considered on the basis of community needs, time element, local interest, available meeting facilities, weather factors (especially in the case of outdoor meetings), and other criteria. Even though there is wide consultation with the team and friends, the final decision to accept, reject or postpone action on an invitation is made by Mr. Graham. He decides only after much prayer-seeking God's leadership in the matter.

After the place and dates are confirmed, a BGEA staff member is assigned to the city as Crusade Director. He opens an office, assists local committees and generally gives leadership in organizing the crusade. The size of the in-city staff varies with each crusade as does the period of preparation, which is usually between eight and twelve months.

Volunteer workers make up the vast majority of personnel required to organize and prepare for a crusade. Only a very small number of crusade staff are salaried. All committee members donate their time and talents to the crusade. It has been estimated that if volunteers were not available, it would require thousands of staff persons to conduct a Graham crusades.

In every crusade, an Executive Committee composed of local clergy and laity is the incorporated policy-making body. It is responsible for determining the budget and raising and disbursing the necessary funds to meet that budget. Members of the Graham team act as consultants to the Executive Committee and its several operational committees including: Prayer (to enlist the prayer support of Christians throughout the area, individually and in groups); Counseling and Follow-up (to enlist counselors and other personnel to deal with inquirers who come forward in response to the evangelist's invitation); "Operation Andrew" (to encourage Christians to bring the unchurched to crusade meetings); Finance (to assist in raising funds); Music; Ushers; etc.

The mass media in a crusade area are served by the Crusade Information Service (CIS), an arm of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association headquartered in Minneapolic, Mennesota. A team member representing CIS is available during the crusade to handle requests for information and interviews. CIS handles accreditation and involvement of all print and broadcast media representatives covering the meeting. CIS staff are available at all times to assist the working press in every way possible.

Because of the increasing number of his commitments, Mr. Graham usually stays only three or four days in a crusade city. The length of a crusade (most often four days, but sometimes less) is determined by such factors as the capacity of the meeting facility, area population, availability of the facilities, the local committee's request and Mr. Graham's other commitments.

The Evangelist arrives in the city often with some of his Associate Evangelists several days prior to the opening date of the crusade. He may be involved in several preliminary meetings. Among those accompanying him will be the music team led by Cliff Barrows, Tom Biedso, John Innes, and George Beverly Shea.

Continued on page 2: »

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