Buddhism and the 12 Steps

Both Buddhist practice and 12-Step programs encourage followers to have faith in their own experience.

Excerpted from "One Breath at a Time: Buddhism and the Twelve Steps" by Kevin Griffin. Copyright c 2004 Kevin Griffin. Reprinted with permission from Rodale.

How Can I Believe?

Buddhism offers a safe way to approach faith. The Buddha invited people to "come and see," ehi-passiko-to come and see for yourself. In the same way, Twelve Step programs don't recruit members but use their members' success in dealing with addiction to speak for itself, a policy called "attraction rather than promotion." Nobody's trying to sell you something with Buddhism or the Twelve Steps-quite literally, since both are primarily supported by donation-but rather they invite you to see how they work for others and yourself before making a commitment.

The Buddha understood the challenge of faith. In the India of his time, many competing teachers claimed to be the repositories of Truth. One community of eager spiritual seekers, the Kalamas, were confused, and asked his advice. In his famous and fundamental teaching, "The Dilemma of the Kalamas," the Buddha explains how to decide whether a teacher or teaching is useful.

The Buddha starts by sweeping away the past as the container of wisdom. It doesn't matter what people tell you or what's been written down; you don't have to believe something just because it's got the weight of history and tradition behind it, he says.

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He goes on to assert that it's not enough that a teaching appeals to our intellect, our logic. While the ideas behind a teaching may be appealing, that doesn't mean they work in real life. What's also implied here is that, just because a teaching "feels right" doesn't mean it is right-a critical point, since we are often drawn to ideas that fit with our own preferences, whether accurate or not.

Finally, he warns against accepting an opinion just because your teacher holds it.

The Buddha takes away many of the standard routes to faith: scripture, tradition, logic, authority. And what he says then is that if you want to know the value of a teacher's offering, you have to try it out and see what the results are. If the results are good, keep it up; if not, drop it. But, to guard against bias in your own interpretation of the results, you should also check with the wise. One way to determine if someone is wise is to see if they are living a skillful life. In Twelve Step terms, "Do you want what they have?" To check with the wise means to listen to the advice of those we trust: a sponsor, mentor, therapist, sibling, parent, friend, or teacher. (Although we don't do something automatically because someone else said we should, we do not dismiss out of hand the suggestions of those who are close to us.)

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