I’m back from my little sojourn at Utah State University–the former agricultural college that is now a splendid city on a hill at the Cache Valley end of beautiful Logan Canyon. They reckon that of its 15,000 undergraduates, 85 percent are LDS. The Mormon equivalent of a Catholic Newman Club and a Jewish Hillel House…

“Once again,” stated the Family Research Council’s Tony Perkins “an activist federal judge is using the military to advance a liberal social agenda, disregarding the views of all four military service chiefs and the constitutional role of Congress.” But not the views of the Commander in Chief, the Secretary of Defense, and the Chairman of…

Of course Bibi Netanyahu’s offer to stop settlement construction if the Palestinian leadership “will say unequivocally to its people that it recognizes Israel as the homeland of the Jewish people,” was designed to be rejected. And the Palestinian leadership immediately went ahead and rejected it. What would have been smart would have been to accept…

The, ah, irrepressible GOP candidate for governor of New York, Carl Paladino, managed to stick his foot in it by assuming the anti-gay posture in a speech to Orthodox Jewish leaders in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (part of the GOP base in the Empire State). As the NYT reports: “I just think my children and your children…

Mark Silk
about

Mark Silk

Mark Silk graduated from Harvard College in 1972 and earned his Ph.D. in medieval history from Harvard University in 1982. After teaching at Harvard in the Department of History and Literature for three years, he became editor of the Boston Review. In 1987 he joined the staff of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where he worked variously as a reporter, editorial writer and columnist. In 1996 he became the founding director of the Leonard E. Greenberg Center for the Study of Religion in Public Life at Trinity College and in 1998 founding editor of Religion in the News, a magazine published by the Center that examines how the news media handle religious subject matter. In 2005, he was named director of the Trinity College Program on Public Values, comprising both the Greenberg Center and a new Institute for the Study of Secularism in Society and Culture directed by Barry Kosmin. In 2007, he became Professor of Religion in Public Life at the College. Professor Silk is the author of Spiritual Politics: Religion and America Since World War II and Unsecular Media: Making News of Religion in America. He is co-editor of Religion by Region, an eight-volume series on religion and public life in the United States, and co-author of The American Establishment, Making Capitalism Work, and One Nation Divisible: How Regional Religious Differences Shape American Politics. In 2007 he inaugurated Spiritual Politics, a blog on religion and American political culture.

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