Beliefnet
One year has passed since the eruption of the bloody clashes between Israel and the Palestinians, during which nearly 800 people, most of them Palestinians, have been killed. The following are major events in the violence from September 28, 2000 to September 27, 2001.

  • September 28, 2000--Ariel Sharon, leader of the then rightwing opposition Likud, entered the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in East Jerusalem, Islam's third holiest site, provoking Palestinian protests and clashes with Israeli police.
  • September 29--Israeli policemen stormed into the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound after Palestinians threw stones at Jewish prayers at the Western Wall in East Jerusalem, leaving six Palestinians dead and about 200 others injured.
  • September 30--The violence spread rapidly throughout the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and 14 Palestinians were killed by Israeli troops, including a 12-year-old boy Mohammed al-Dura. The killing of al-Dura shocked the world.
  • October 1--Thousands of Israeli Arabs took to the streets to show solidarity with the Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip and express their frustration over social discrimination. Their protests lasted for about two weeks, during which 13 Israeli Arabs were killed in clashes with the police.
  • October 4--Then Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat held a meeting in Paris, which was also attended by French President Jacques Chirac and then U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. But the meeting failed to find a way to end the clashes.
  • October 7--The United Nations Security Council adopted a resolution condemning Israel's "excessive use of force" against the Palestinians.
  • October 12--Two Israeli soldiers captured by Palestinian security forces in the West Bank city of Ramallah were lynched to death by a group of Palestinians. Israeli army launched retaliatory attacks on Palestinian targets with the use of helicopters and anti-tank missiles for the first time, signaling the escalation of the conflict.
  • October 17--Israel and the Palestinians reached a truce at a multilateral summit in Egypt's Red Sea resort of Sharm el Sheikh. The two sides outlined measures for ending the bloody conflict, but the ceasefire was not fully carried out.
  • October 21--Israeli troops used tanks for the first time in the conflict to fire at the West Bank town of Beit Jala as a warning to Palestinian gunmen, who shot at the nearby Jewish settlement of Gilo, south of Jerusalem. Since then, the shooting attacks against Gilo have rarely stopped.
  • November 9--Israeli helicopters fired missiles at Hussein Abayat, commander of the Palestinian mainstream Fatah movement, when he drove near the West Bank town of Beit Sahour. Abayat was the first Palestinian killed under Israel's policy of "targeted liquidation." A total of 29 Palestinian activists were assassinated in this way in the one-year violence.
  • November 11--Two Israelis were killed when a booby-trapped car exploded in an alley near the Mahane Yehuda open market in Jerusalem.
  • November 20--Israeli helicopters launched massive attacks on Palestinian targets in the Gaza Strip in retaliation for a bomb assault on a Jewish settlers' school bus, which left two people dead and 12 others wounded. Egypt recalled its ambassador to Israel due to Israel's excessive use of force.
  • November 28--Barak agreed to an early election.
  • December 10--Barak resigned and a special prime ministerial election would be held within 60 days.
  • December 11--A five-member international fact-finding commission, led by former U.S. Senator George Mitchell, arrived in the region and began to collect testimonies on the cause of the Palestinian-Israeli violence.
  • December 28--Fifteen Israelis were injured when a bomb exploded in downtown Tel Aviv.
  • January 1, 2001--Fifty-four Israelis were injured when a booby-trapped car exploded at a busy junction in northern Israeli city of Netanya.
  • January 29--Barak cut off diplomatic contacts with Arafat until after the election, less than 24 hours after Israeli and Palestinian negotiators issued a joint statement saying that they had never been closer to peace, following their week-long peace talks in the Egypt's Red Sea resort of Taba.
  • February 6--Hawkish Likud leader Sharon trounced Barak in the prime ministerial election by the largest margin in Israel's election history.
  • February 14--A bus driven by a Palestinian rammed into Israeli soldiers and civilians waiting at a bus stop near Tel Aviv, killing eight people and injuring 14 others.
  • February 26--Israel's Labor Party decided to join the national unity government led by Sharon.
  • March 4--Three Israelis were killed and more than 50 others injured when a bomb exploded near the main market in Netanya.
  • March 7--The new Israeli government with 26 ministers and 14 deputy ministers, largest-ever in the Jewish state's 52-year history, was sworn in.
  • March 28--Two Israelis were killed when a Palestinian suicide bomber blew himself up at a gas station near the West Bank city of Qalqilya.
  • April 1--An Israeli squad entered Area A, areas under full Palestinian control, to arrest Palestinians, suspected of participating in terrorist attacks near Ramallah. It was the first time that Israeli troops carried out operations in Area A since the outbreak of the conflict.
  • April 22--One person was killed and dozens of others injured when a Palestinian suicide bomber blew himself up near a bus station in central Israeli city of Kfar Sava.
  • May 17--The Israeli government expressed willingness to accept the Mitchell report of the international fact-finding committee on the causes of the violence. The Palestinians later also accepted the report.
  • May 18--A Palestinian carried out a suicide bombing attack in Netanya, leaving at least five Israelis dead and more than 100 injured.
  • May 19--In retaliation for the Netanya bombing attack, Israel used F-16 fighter jets, for the first time in the violence, to fire missiles at Palestinian security headquarters in the West Bank cities of Jenin and Tulkarm. The attack left at least nine Palestinians dead.
  • May 22--Sharon announced a "unilateral ceasefire," but in fact the Israeli army only refrained from launching offensive operations.
  • May 25--Sixty-seven Israelis were injured when a car bomb blew up near the central bus station in Hadera. The two suicide bombers were killed in the explosion.
  • June 1--A Palestinian carried out a suicide bombing attack outside a nightclub in Tel Aviv, leaving at least 21 Israeli teenagers dead and more than 100 injured. It was the worst suicide bombing attack against Israelis since 1997.
  • June 2--Arafat strongly condemned the Tel Aviv bombing attack and emphasized that the Palestinians would make maximum efforts to seek an unconditional, real and effective ceasefire.
  • June 13--Israel and the Palestinians accepted a ceasefire proposed by U.S. Central Intelligence Agency Director George Tenet.
  • But the ceasefire has never been fully implemented.
  • July 17--Two Israeli soldiers were killed and 10 people injured in a Palestinian suicide bombing attack in the northern Israeli city of Haifa.
  • July 29--A massive clash between Palestinian protesters and Israeli policemen erupted in East Jerusalem after the Israeli right-wing extremist group "the Temple Mount Faithful" held a foundation laying ceremony for "the Third Temple" on the sensitive Temple Mount.
  • July 31--Israeli helicopter gunships fired missiles at a Hamas' office in Nablus, killing two senior Hamas leaders and six others, including two innocent children.
  • August 9--Fifteen Israelis died and more than 100 others were injured in a Palestinian suicide bombing attack at a restaurant in downtown Jerusalem.
  • August 10--Israeli police took over Orient House, the unofficial Palestinian representative office in East Jerusalem, and some Palestinian offices in the Jerusalem Arab neighborhood of Abu Dis.
  • August 14--In the largest military operation against the Palestinians since the outbreak of the conflict, Israeli troops stormed into the West Bank city of Jenin under Palestinian rule. The Israeli troops withdrew from the city after demolishing a Palestinian police station.
  • August 27--Abu Ali Mustafa, general secretary of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, was killed in an Israeli missile strike on his office in Ramallah. Mustafa is the most senior Palestinian official killed in the Israeli "targeted liquidation."
  • August 30--The Israeli army pulled out of the Palestinian town of Beit Jala following a three-day re-occupation, after the Palestinians pledged not to shoot at the nearby Jewish settlement of Gilo. It was the longest re-occupation of Area A by the Israeli army since the eruption of the violence.
  • September 9--Two Israeli soldiers were killed and nearly 100 others wounded in a suicide bombing attack in northern Israeli city of Nahariya. The suicide bomber was an Israeli Arab, the first in the violence.
  • September 11--The Israeli army invaded Jenin again, claiming that the city was "producing suicide bombers."
  • September 17--Arafat said that he had instructed his security forces to implement a complete ceasefire, even in self-defense. Hours later, the Israeli army announced to halt offensive operations. The army then withdrew from several reoccupied Palestinian areas.
  • September 26--Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and Arafat held a long-anticipated meeting, during which they agreed on the implementation of the Mitchell report and the U.S.-brokered ceasefire plan.
  • September 27--Despite the Peres-Arafat agreement, violence continued in the Gaza Strip, in which five Palestinians were killed and at least 27 others injured.
  • Join the Discussion
    comments powered by Disqus