Left-side Stroke

(Stroke, Left-side; Left Hemisphere Stroke; Stroke, Left Hemisphere)

Definition

The cerebrum is the largest part of the brain. It is made of a left and a right hemisphere. The left hemisphere is in charge of the functions on the right side of the body. In most people, it is also involved in abilities such as the ability to speak, or use language.A left-side stroke happens when the blood supply to the left side of the brain is interrupted. Without oxygen and nutrients from blood, the brain tissue quickly dies.
cerebrum
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There are 2 main types of stroke: ischemic and hemorrhagic. An ischemic stroke is the most common type of stroke.

Causes

An ischemic stroke is caused by a blockage of the blood flow, which may be due to:
  • A clot from another part of the body like the heart or neck. The clot breaks off and flows through the blood until it becomes trapped in a blood vessel supplying the brain.
  • A clot that forms in an artery that supplies blood to the brain.
  • A tear in an artery supplying blood to the brain—arterial dissection.
A hemorrhagic stroke is caused by a burst blood vessel. Blood spills out of the broken blood vessel and pools in the brain. This interrupts the flow of blood and causes a build up of pressure on the brain.
Hemorrhagic vs. Ischemic Stroke
factsheet image
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Risk Factors

Certain factors increase your risk of stroke but can not be changed, such as:
  • Race—People of African American, Hispanic, or Asian/Pacific Islander descent are at increased risk.
  • Age: Older than 55 years of age.
  • Family history of stroke.
Other factors that may increase your risk can be changed, such as:Certain medical condition that can increase your risk of stroke. Management or prevention of these conditions can significantly decrease your risk. Medical conditions include:Risk factors specific to women include:

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