Pes Cavus

(Cavus Foot; High Arched Foot; Claw Foot)


Pes cavus is an abnormally high arched foot. People with this condition place too much weight and stress on the ball and heel of the foot when standing or walking.


Pes cavus can be caused by an underlying disease, injury, or an inherited foot problem. Causes include:

Risk Factors

Pes cavus has a tendency to run in families. If you have a family member with very high arches, then you may be at increased risk for developing pes cavus.


Symptoms associated with pes cavus include:
  • Foot pain
  • Stiff joints
  • Pain when standing and/or walking
  • Hammertoes
  • Claw toes
  • Calluses
  • Foot drop—the foot does not flex up
  • Instability
Claw Toes
claw toe
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You will be asked about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. You will also be asked about your family medical history. Your foot will be examined closely. Your doctor may move it around to assess range of motion.You may be referred to a specialist. An orthopedist specializes in bones. Podiatrists specialize in feet. The condition may be caused by a nervous system condition. In this case your doctor may refer you to a neurologist. Images may need to be taken of your foot. This can be done with x-rays.

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