Receptive Aphasia

(Alexia; Alexic Anomia; Word Blindness; Text Blindness; Visual Aphasia)


Alexic anomia happens when you lose your ability to understand written words. You can no longer read and name words. This is a type of receptive aphasia, which is a language disorder that involves difficulty understanding spoken or written language. It is caused by the brain not functioning correctly. This is a serious condition that may change over time, depending on the cause.
Stroke—Most Common Cause of Alexic Anomia
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Alexic anomia is caused by damage to the language areas of the brain, for example:

Risk Factors

Alexic anomia is more common in older people. Other factors that may increase your chance of alexic anomia include:


Symptoms include:
  • Inability to read with understanding
  • Ability to write, but not read what you have written


Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. A neurological examination and tests may also be done to check brain function.Imaging tests are used to evaluate the brain and other structures. These may include:You may be referred to a neurologist. This is a doctor who specializes in diseases of the nervous system.

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