Risk Factors for Sleep Apnea

A risk factor is something that increases your likelihood of getting a disease or condition.It is possible to develop sleep apnea with or without the risk factors listed below. However, the more risk factors you have, the greater your likelihood of developing sleep apnea. If you have a number of risk factors, ask your doctor what you can do to reduce your risk.Risk factors for sleep apnea include:

Smoking

People who smoke more than two packs per day are more likely to develop sleep apnea than nonsmokers.

Alcohol

Some studies have shown that people who use alcohol regularly have an increased risk of sleep apnea.

Sedative Medications

Using sedative medications can increase your risk of sleep apnea.

Medical Conditions

The following conditions may increase your risk of obstructive sleep apnea:The following conditions may increase your risk of central sleep apnea:

Gender

Men are thought to be 2 to 4 times more likely to develop sleep apnea than women. However, some researchers have suggested that this difference may be because women are underdiagnosed with the condition.

Genetic Factors

Sleep apnea appears to run in certain families.

Ethnic Background

Sleep apnea is more common among:
  • African Americans
  • People of Mexican origin
  • Pacific Islanders

Physical Characteristics

You have an increased risk of developing sleep apnea if you have the following physical characteristics:
  • Thick neck
  • Obstructed nasal passages
  • Large tongue
  • Narrow airway
  • Receding chin
  • Overbite
  • Certain shapes and increased rigidity of the palate and jaw
You also have an increased risk of developing sleep apnea if you breathe through your mouth while sleeping, or if you snore.

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