Healthy Recipes

Yosemite Chicken Stew and Dumplings
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Servings: 6
Ingredients and Preparation
Ingredients Measures
Skinless, boneless chicken meat, cut into 1-inch cubes 1 pound
Onion, coarsely chopped ½ cup
Medium carrot, peeled and thinly sliced 1
Celery, thinly sliced 1 stalk
Salt ¼ teaspoon
Black pepper to taste
Ground cloves 1 pinch
Bay leaf 1
Water 3 cups
Cornstarch 1 teaspoon
Dried basil 1 teaspoon
(10 ounces) frozen peas 1 package
Yellow corn meal 1 cup
Sifted all-purpose flour ¾ cup
Baking powder 2 teaspoons
Salt ½ teaspoon
Low-fat (1%) milk 1 cup
Vegetable oil 1 tablespoon

  1. Place chicken, onion, carrot, celery, salt, pepper, cloves, bay leaf, and water into a large saucepan. Heat to boiling; cover and reduce heat to simmer. Cook for about ½ hour or until chicken is tender.
  2. Remove chicken and vegetables from broth. Strain broth.
  3. Skim fat from broth; measure and, if necessary, add water to make 3 cups liquid.
  4. Mix cornstarch with 1 cup cooled broth by shaking vigorously in a jar with a tight-fitting lid.
  5. Pour into saucepan with remaining broth; cook, stirring constantly, until mixture comes to a boil and is thickened.
  6. Add basil, peas, and reserved vegetables to sauce; stir to combine.
  7. Add chicken and heat slowly to boiling while preparing corn meal dumplings.
  1. Sift together corn meal, flour, baking powder, and salt into a large mixing bowl.
  2. Mix together milk and oil. Add milk mixture all at once to dry ingredients; stir just enough to moisten flour and evenly distribute liquid. Dough will be soft.
  3. Drop by full tablespoons on top of braised meat or stew. Cover tightly; heat to boiling. Reduce heat (do not lift cover) to simmering and steam for about 20 minutes.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1¼ cup stew with 2 dumplings
Calories 307
Total Fat 5 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Cholesterol 43 mg
Sodium 471 mg
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