Talking to Your Doctor about Cervical Cancer

You have a unique medical history. Therefore, it is essential to talk with your doctor about your personal risk factors and/or experience with cervical cancer. By talking openly and regularly with your doctor, you can take an active role in your care.Here are some tips that will make it easier for you to talk to your doctor:

  • Bring someone else with you. It helps to have another person hear what is said and think of questions to ask and then to discuss the meeting later.
  • Write out your questions ahead of time, so you don't forget them.
  • Write down the answers you get, and make sure you understand what you are hearing. Ask for clarification, if necessary.
  • Don't be afraid to ask your questions or ask where you can find more information about what you are discussing. You have a right to know.
  • What type of cervical cancer do I have?
  • What is the stage of my cancer?
    • What does that mean in my case?
  • Has my cancer spread beyond the cervix?
  • Based on my medical history, lifestyle, and family background, am I at an increased risk of cervical cancer?
  • What specific things can I do to reduce my risk of developing cervical cancer?
  • What treatments are used with cervical cancer?
  • What treatment is appropriate for me? Why?
  • What should I do to be ready for treatment?
  • How long will my treatment last?
  • What risks and side effects should I watch for?
  • Will it affect my normal activities?
  • Will it affect my sexual activity?
  • Will I be able to have children after my treatment?
  • What is likely to happen without treatment?
  • What medications are available to me?
    • What are the benefits/side effects of these medications?
    • Will these medications interact with other medications, over-the-counter products, or dietary or herbal supplements that I am already taking?
  • Are there any alternative or complementary therapies that will help me?
  • Should I follow a special diet?
  • Are there any dietary changes I should make? How do I go about it?
  • Should I begin an exercise program?
    • What kind of exercise is best?
    • How often should I exercise?
    • How do I get started exercising?
  • Should I stop drinking alcohol?
  • How can I find help quitting smoking?
  • How will cervical cancer affect my sexual activity?
  • Can you recommend some cervical cancer support groups for myself and my family?
  • What are the chances my cancer will come back after treatment?
  • How will I know that my treatment has been effective?
  • What can I tell my husband, children, parents, and other family members and friends about my condition?
  • What is my expected prognosis?
  • How often will I need checkups?

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