Methicillin-Resistant Staph Infection

(MRSA; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection; Infection, Methicillin-Resistant; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Community-Acquired MRSA;CA-MRSA; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Nosocomial MRSA;Healthcare-Associated MRSA;HA-MRSA)

Definition

Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a potentially serious infection that resists antibiotics. MRSA can affect the skin, blood, bones, or lungs. A person can either be infected or colonized with MRSA.There are two types of MRSA infections:
  • Community-acquired—getting the infection outside of a healthcare setting, such as a hospital or clinic
  • Nosocomial—getting the infection while inside a healthcare setting
MRSA can spread several ways:
  • Contaminated surfaces
  • Person-to-person
  • From one area of the body to another

Causes

MRSA is caused by specific bacteria that resist antibiotics. Over time, bacteria adapt to repeated exposure to antibiotics, building up a resistance to them.

Risk Factors

Factors that may increase your chance of developing MRSA include:
  • Community-acquired:
    • Impaired immunity
    • Sharing crowded spaces such as dormitories or locker rooms
    • Using IV drugs
    • Having a serious illness
    • Age: Child
    • Being an athlete, especially in sports using direct contact such as wrestling and football
    • Being a prisoner
    • Being a member of the military
    • Exposure to animals such as being a pet owner, veterinarian, or pig farmer
    • Using antibiotics
    • Having a chronic skin disorder
    • Having a wound
    • Being infected with MRSA in the past
  • Nosocomial:
    • Exposure to hospital or clinical settings
    • Living in a long-term care center
    • Impaired immunity
    • Advanced age
    • Sex: male
    • Using antibiotics
    • Having a wound

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