Hypochondria

(Hypochondriasis)

Definition

Hypochondria is a health anxiety disorder. It is often chronic. A person with hypochondria is often very anxious about their health. A hypochondriac fears that a real or imagined minor physical symptom is a sign of serious illness. Even when several doctors assure them otherwise, a hypochondriac is convinced that they have a serious disease. Psychiatric counseling and medications can relieve some, if not all, of the anxiety and suffering. Left untreated, hypochondria can be debilitating and affect daily function.

Causes

It is often difficult to identify a specific cause for hypochondria.

Risk Factors

Factors that may increase your risk for getting hypochondria include:
  • Family history of hypochondria
  • Having a serious childhood illness
  • Psychiatric disorders such as depression , anxiety, or personality disorder
  • Physical, sexual, or emotional abuse in childhood
  • Observing violence in childhood
  • Stressful experience with your own or a loved one's illness
  • History of personal traumatic experience
Brain—Psychological Organ
Brain Man Face
Chemical imbalances and traumatic life experiences may contribute to the development of hypochondria.
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

Symptoms

Symptoms include:
  • Chronic fear of serious illness
  • Chronic fear that minor symptoms are signs of a serious illness
  • Many physical complaints that often change over time
  • The disorder:
    • Lasts at least six months
    • Causes major distress
    • Interferes with social life or work
  • You may:
    • Check yourself frequently
    • Make many doctor visits, sometimes in the same day
    • Seek repeated tests for the same symptoms
    • Repeatedly research information about specific illnesses and their symptom
    • Change healthcare providers frequently
    • Try multiple herbal remedies or other alternative treatments

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