Rotator Cuff Injury

(Rotator Cuff Tear; Impingement Syndrome)

Definition

Rotator cuff injury may include tendinitis, strain, or tear of the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is made up of muscles and 4 separate tendons that fuse together to surround the shoulder joint.
Rotator Cuff Injury
factsheet image
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

Causes

Causes of a rotator cuff injury include:
  • Direct blow to the shoulder area
  • Falling on an outstretched arm
  • Chronic degenerative wear and tear on the tendons:
    • Arthritis may decrease the space for the tendons
    • Chronic instability of the humerus may traumatize the tendons
  • Repetitive overhead motion of the arm such as in:
    • Swimming
    • Baseball (mainly pitching)
    • Tennis

Risk Factors

Rotator cuff injury is more common in people 40 years and older. Other factors that increase your chance of a rotator cuff injury include:
  • Heavy lifting
  • Abnormalities of the shoulder, or in rotator cuff anatomy or function
  • Activities that involve repetitive overhead arm motion such as throwing
  • Weakened shoulder muscles from inactivity or previous injury

Symptoms

Rotator cuff injury may cause:
  • Recurrent, constant pain, particularly when reaching overhead
  • Pain at night that prevents you from sleeping
  • Shoulder muscle weakness, especially when lifting the arm
  • Popping or clicking sounds when the shoulder is moved
  • Limited range of motion in the shoulder joint

Diagnosis

You will be asked about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done, paying particular attention to your shoulder. You will be asked to move your shoulder in several directions.Tests may include:
  • Ultrasound
  • Arthrogram
  • MRI scan
  • Arthroscopy

leave comments
0
Did you like this? Share with your family and friends.
Related Topics:
Current Research From Top Journals


Fecal Transplants Induce Ulcerative Colitis Remission
July 2015

A randomized trial found that fecal microbiota transplantation had a higher rate of remission in patients with active ulcerative colitis than those who recieved placebo. Fecal transplantation is believed to help the intestine develop a healthy balance of bacteria in the gut which can help the intestine recover and function more effectively.

dot separator
previous editions

Exercise Associated with Healthy Baby Weight
June 2015

Mindful Meditation May Reduce Symptoms and Complications of Insomnia
May 2015

Chewing Gum After Surgery May Improve Digestive Tract Recovery
April 2015

dashed separator

Advertisement

Our Free Newsletter
click here to see all of our uplifting newsletters »

 

Advertisement

Advertisement

DiggDeliciousNewsvineRedditStumbleTechnoratiFacebook