Lateral Epicondylitis

(Tennis Elbow)

Definition

Lateral epicondylitis is pain at the elbow. The pain occurs over the bone on the outside of the elbow. There are several muscles and tendons that attach on this area of the bone.This condition is often called tennis elbow, but it is not restricted to people who play tennis. It can also occur in people with jobs that require repetitive motions such as roofers and carpenters.
Lateral Epicondylitis
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Causes

Lateral epicondylitis is caused by damage to a tendon.Tendons connects muscles to bone. Repetitive or stressful movements of the muscles causes strain and pain at the tendon. The tendons associated with lateral epicondylitis are connected to forearm muscles. These muscles are active when you grip something, such as a tennis racquet. Actions that can cause irritation to the tendons of the elbow include:
  • Improper technique for hitting a tennis ball
  • Improper size of tennis racquet or tension of racquet strings
  • Improper golf swing technique or grip of golf clubs
  • Doing certain arm motions too much, such as:
    • Tennis strokes
    • Golf swings
    • Painting
    • Raking
    • Pitching
    • Rowing
    • Using a hammer or screwdriver

Risk Factors

Factors that increase your risk of lateral epicondylitis include:
  • Playing tennis or golf
  • Work that requires repetitive wrist extension and gripping with a closed fist
  • Muscle imbalance
  • Decreased flexibility
  • Advancing age

Symptoms

Lateral epicondylitis may develop slowly over time. It may not be associated with a sudden injury. Symptoms include:
  • Pain and tenderness on the outside of the elbow
  • Possibly pain extending down the forearm
  • Tightness of forearm muscles
  • Stiffness or trouble moving the elbow or wrist
  • Lack of full elbow extension
Pain may be most noticeable when doing activities like:
  • Shaking hands
  • Turning doorknobs
  • Picking up objects with your palm down
  • Hitting a backhand in tennis
  • Swinging a golf club
  • Pressing on the outside of the elbow

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