Toe Fracture

(Broken Toe; Fracture, Toe)


A toe fracture is a break in a toe bone. The bones in the toes are called phalanges.
The Phalanges of the Foot
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A toe fracture is caused by trauma to the bone. Trauma can result from:
  • Dropping something on your toe
  • Stubbing your toe
  • Falling down
  • A direct blow to the toe

Risk Factors

Factors that may increase your chance of a toe fracture include:
  • Advanced age
  • Osteoporosis
  • Poor nutrition
  • Participating in contact sports
  • Not wearing shoes


A toe fracture may cause:
  • Pain
  • Swelling and tenderness
  • Stiffness in the injured area
  • Inability to move toe
  • Bruising in injured area
  • Numbness or tingling in the toes
  • Visible deformity in the toe area
  • Difficulty walking (sometimes)


You will be asked about your symptoms, level of physical activity, and how the injury occurred. The injured area will be examined. Your doctor may take an x-ray of the foot, but this is not always needed.


Proper treatment can prevent long-term complications or problems with your toe, such as immobility or misalignment. Treatment will depend on how serious the fracture is, but may include:

Initial Care

Extra support may be needed to protect, support, and keep your toe in line while it heals. Supportive steps may include buddy taping (your injured toe is taped to healthy toes next to it), a walking cast, or a shoe with a stiff bottom.Some fractures cause pieces of bone to separate. Your doctor will need to put these pieces back into their proper place. This may be done:
  • Without surgery—you will have anesthesia to decrease pain while the doctor moves the pieces back into place
  • With surgery—pins or screws may be needed to reconnect the pieces and hold them in place
Children’s bones are still growing at an area of the bone called the growth plate. If the fracture affected the growth plate, your child may need to see a specialist. Injuries to the growth plate will need to be monitored to make sure the bone can continue to grow as expected.


Prescription or over-the-counter medications may be given to help reduce inflammation and pain.Note: Aspirin is not recommended for children with a current or recent viral infection. Check with your doctor before giving your child aspirin.

Rest and Recovery

The toe will need time to heal. Activities will need to be adjusted, but complete rest is rarely required. Ice and elevating the leg at rest will help with discomfort and swelling.

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