Atherosclerosis is hardening of a blood vessel from a buildup of plaque. Plaque is made of fatty deposits, cholesterol, and calcium. It builds on the inside lining of arteries. This causes the artery to narrow and harden. As plaque builds up, it can slow and even stop blood flow. Endarterectomy is a surgery to remove this build-up and improve blood flow. Surgery is most often performed on:
  • Carotid arteries in the neck that supply the brain—most common use of endarterectomy
  • The aorta—a major artery that runs from the heart to the abdomen
  • Iliac and femoral arteries of the legs
  • Renal arteries that supply the kidneys with blood
Bilateral Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis
Nucleus image
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

Reasons for Procedure

This surgery is done to remove the build-up of deposits and improve blood flow. After the surgery, the symptoms of reduced blood flow, such as stroke, digestive problems, and leg cramps should improve.

Possible Complications

If you are planning to have endarterectomy, your doctor will review a list of possible complications, which may include:
  • Bleeding
  • Stroke, particularly if the carotid arteries are involved
  • Blood clots
  • Adverse reaction to the anesthesia
  • Infection
Before your procedure, talk to your doctor about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications such as:
  • Smoking
  • Drinking
  • Chronic disease such as diabetes or obesity
Your risk of complications may also be increased if you have plaque build-up in other vessels.

What to Expect

Prior to Procedure

Before the surgery, your doctor will:
  • Give you an exam to make sure that you are healthy enough for the surgery
  • Order studies that show detailed images of your arteries
Talk to your doctor about your medications. You may be asked to stop taking some medications up to one week before the procedure.In addition, you may be instructed to:
  • Avoid eating or drinking after midnight the night before the surgery.
  • Arrange for a ride home from the hospital.


You may have:
  • General anesthesia—blocks any pain and keeps you asleep through the surgery; given through an IV
  • Local anesthesia—numbs an area of your body so that you stay awake through the surgery; may be given as an injection

Description of the Procedure

Incisions will be made over the diseased part of the artery. The location will depend on the artery that is being unblocked.In the abdomen and legs, the artery above the obstruction will be clamped during the repair. The lower half of the body can go without blood supply during the time it takes to do the surgery. If surgery is done on the neck, the blood around the surgical site may first be rerouted. This will keep blood going to the brain.The inside of the artery will be cleaned out. Care will be taken not to have small fragments of the deposits break off and flow downstream, causing stroke or arterial occlusion. After the artery is cleaned out, the artery and the skin will be closed with sutures or staples.

How Long Will It Take?

Several hours, depending on the severity of the disease

How Much Will It Hurt?

After surgery, there will be pain from the incisions. Ask your doctor about medication to help reduce discomfort.

Average Hospital Stay

This procedure is done in a hospital setting. The usual length of stay is one day to one week. You may need to stay longer if complications occur.

Post-procedure Care

At the HospitalWhile you are recovering at the hospital, you may receive the following care:
  • You will be monitored to make sure that you are not bleeding, clotting, or developing an infection.
  • You will also be monitored to make sure that your wound is healing properly and that your pain is managed.
During your stay, the hospital staff will take steps to reduce your chance of infection such as:
  • Washing their hands
  • Wearing gloves or masks
  • Keeping your incisions covered
There are also steps you can take to reduce your chances of infection such as:
  • Washing your hands often and reminding visitors and healthcare providers to do the same
  • Reminding your healthcare providers to wear gloves or masks
  • Not allowing others to touch your incisions
At HomeWhen you return home, do the following to help ensure a smooth recovery:
  • If advised by your doctor, take blood thinners.
  • To help reduce the risk of plaque build-up, make changes to your diet, such as eating a diet:
  • If advised by your doctor, work with a nutritionist.
  • Be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions.

leave comments
Did you like this? Share with your family and friends.
Related Topics: Health And Healing
Meet Our Health Experts
Healing and Transformation

Healing and Transformation

David G. Arenson
Destiny amp the Choices We Make
beginners heart

Beginner's Heart

Britton Gildersleeve
of outsiders refugees and the sound of hearts breaking


Our Free Newsletter
click here to see all of our uplifting newsletters »