Epidermal Cyst

(Epidermoid Cyst; Epidermal Inclusion Cyst; Epithelial Cyst; Keratin Cyst)

Definition

An epidermal cyst is a type of slow-growing lump underneath the skin. This cyst contains soft, cheese-like skin contents. These usually appear on the face, neck, chest, upper back, genitals, or behind the ears. Similar cysts called pilar cysts often occur on the scalp.

Causes

Causes include:
  • Blockage of a hair follicle by skin cells—When an injury to the skin occurs, cells from the surface may block hair follicles located deeper within the skin.
  • Damage to a hair follicle due to acne
  • Blockage or defect of the sebaceous gland—This gland is near the hair follicle. It secretes oily material used to lubricate the skin and hair.
Hair Follicle
si1844 96472 1
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

Risk Factors

Acne and skin injuries increase your risk of developing an epidermal cyst.

Symptoms

If you have any of these symptoms, do not assume it is due to a cyst. These symptoms may be caused by other conditions. Tell your doctor if you have any of these:
  • Small, dome-shaped lump beneath the skin
  • Foul-smelling, cheese-like material draining from the cyst
  • Redness or tenderness on or around the cyst if it becomes inflamed

Diagnosis

You will be asked about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. In most cases, the diagnosis can be made by looking at it. You may be referred to a dermatologist. This is a doctor who specializes in skin disorders.

Treatment

Talk with your doctor about the best treatment plan for you. Treatment options include the following:
  • Surgical excision—The doctor removes the entire cyst, including its contents and cyst wall.
  • Surgical drainage—This involves cutting open the cyst, and draining the contents. The cyst might come back, though.
  • Antibiotics—These may be prescribed if the cyst has become in infected.

leave comments
0
Did you like this? Share with your family and friends.
Related Topics:
Current Research From Top Journals


Fecal Transplants Induce Ulcerative Colitis Remission
July 2015

A randomized trial found that fecal microbiota transplantation had a higher rate of remission in patients with active ulcerative colitis than those who recieved placebo. Fecal transplantation is believed to help the intestine develop a healthy balance of bacteria in the gut which can help the intestine recover and function more effectively.

dot separator
previous editions

Exercise Associated with Healthy Baby Weight
June 2015

Mindful Meditation May Reduce Symptoms and Complications of Insomnia
May 2015

Chewing Gum After Surgery May Improve Digestive Tract Recovery
April 2015

dashed separator

Advertisement

Our Free Newsletter
click here to see all of our uplifting newsletters »

 

Advertisement

Advertisement

DiggDeliciousNewsvineRedditStumbleTechnoratiFacebook