Tithing Chart

Tithing Chart



What's on the Collection Plate?
Just like the government, many religions tax, too. But do all religions have tithing requirements? Use this chart to see which faiths require a certain amount, and what followers can gain spiritually from their donations.


Religion Obligation Spiritual Component Source
Baha'i Baha'is are asked to make voluntary contributions--often as much as 19% of their income--to Baha'i causes and the Baha'i world center. Contributions are considered a sacred obligation, in order to expand Baha'i spiritual activities. Several Baha'i writings explain the importance of both generosity and the Baha'i fund.
Buddhist Buddhism emphasizes the giving of alms, or dana, to Buddhist monks, nuns, and other teachers of the dharma. Dana is an act of generosity and reverence. Almsgiving is considered a way of cultivating selflessness, compassion, and non-attachment. Buddhist texts encourage giving, but they do not stipulate exact amounts.
Catholic Most Catholic churches suggest that parishioners contribute 10% of their income to charity, with 5% going to the local church and 5% going to the parishioner's charity of choice. The concept of sacrificial giving is very important in Catholicism, both to help those less fortunate and to show gratitude for God's gifts. Catholics follow the Bible's words about tithing and giving. "Active love for the poor" is also emphasized in the catechism's treatment of the commandment "You shall not steal."
Earth-based There is no pagan or Wiccan tithe, though charity is emphasized as a virtue. Giving is at the discretion of the individual. Spiritual benefits are often derived from helping others in their communities. No real source, since contributions are left up to the individual.
Eastern Orthodox The Orthodox Church emphasizes voluntary stewardship instead of a specific tithe amount. The church sees stewardship as a way for members of the church to participate fully in the church. The Orthodox concept of stewardship comes from both the Old and New Testaments.
Hindu There is no official Hindu tithe, but Hindus do pay for pujas and often donate to their temples. Donation is considered a religious duty in Hinduism. Hindus also donate daan, alms, to holy men and the poor. Though there is no tithe, giving is still an element in many Hindu sacred texts.
Jewish Jews are obligated to give between 10% and 20% of their income to charity. Synagogues are supported by voluntary donations for membership dues, which are separate from charitable obligations. Giving tzedakah is considered a sign of righteousness. The rabbis limited tzedakah to no more than a fifth of one's income so that no one would impoverish him- or herself by giving to others in need. Few people today follow the tithing laws outlined in the Torah. Instead, many Jews use Maimonides' ladder of charity as a tool for understanding the modern Jewish conception of tzedakah.
Mormon Mormons are required to tithe 10% of their income to the church. The tithe is used to pay for the operating costs of the church, as well as the funding of new temples, missionary programs, and more. Mormons consider tithes to be sacred money, and tithing is seen as a duty and a test of faithfulness. Mormon laws of tithing are outlined in the Latter-day Saints' Doctrine & Covenants.
Muslim Muslims are required to pay zakat, one of the five pillars of Islam. Normally Muslims pay at least 2.5% in zakat. Muslims may also choose to pay voluntary charity, or sadaqah. Zakat means "purification" and "growth." The giving of this obligatory tithing to religious authorities is considered a monetary act of worship. Giving zakat is said to purify wealth and also enhance it. "And keep up Salaat and pay Zakaat and contribute for Allah's Sake a contribution."
--Qur'an 73:20.
Protestant Many Protestant churches follow the biblical exhortation to give 10% of one's income back to God. The tithe goes to wherever a person receives his or her spiritual teaching. Many Protestant churches emphasize stewardship as the path to receiving God's blessings and both spiritual and material abundance. Malachi 3:8-10 and many other Bible verses.

Text by Rebecca Phillips

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