Reader

You all remember the story of the baby Moses, who was hidden from Pharaoh's soldiers by his mother. He was discovered by the Princess and taken to live in Pharaoh's palace. The princess named the baby Moshe, the Egyptian word for "boy-child from the lake." But Moses' own mother became his nursemaid and secretly taught him about his heritage. Moses grew up in the palace. He lived and acted like an Egyptian, but in his heart he was a Hebrew. When Moses became the leader of the Jews, he begged Pharaoh to let his people go in freedom. But the Egyptians responded by making life even more terrible for the Jews.

"And we cried unto the Lord, the God of our fathers and mothers, and the Lord heard our voice and saw our troubles and our toil and our oppression. And the Lord brought us forth out of Egypt, with a mighty hand and with an outstretched arm and with great terror and with signs and with wonders."

Song: "Let My People Go"

When Israel was in Egypt's land,
Let my people go!
Oppressed so hard they could not stand,
Let my people go!
Go down, Moses, way down in Egypt's land;
Tell old Pharaoh, "Let my people go!"

"Thus saith the Lord," bold Moses said,
"Let my people go!
If not, I'll smite your first-born dead,
Let my people go!"
Go down, Moses, way down in Egypt's land
Tell old Pharaoh, "Let my people go.!"

The Lord told Moses what to do,
Let my people go!
To lead the children of Israel thru',
Let my people to!
Go down, Moses, way down in Egypt's land
Tell old Pharaoh, "Let my people go!"

When they had reached the other shore,
Let my people go!
They sang the song of triumph o'er,
Let my people go!
Go down, Moses, way down in Egypt's land
Tell old Pharaoh, "Let my people go!"


Reader

When Pharaoh defied the command of God and refused to release the Jews, he brought trouble upon himself and his people, for the Lord afflicted Egypt with plagues. Only after the 10th plague did Pharaoh relent and let the Jews go free. And, even then, he sent his troops after them in the desert. But the Israelites were again rescued from extinction.

But the story of Passover also teaches us that, even when the Egyptian armies were drowning in the sea, Jews were cautioned to temper their rejoicing with sorrow over the loss of life.

"My creatures are perishing, and you sing praises?
Though we descend from those redeemed from brutal Egypt,
And have ourselves rejoiced to see oppressors overcome,
Yet our triumph is diminished
By the slaughter of the foe,
As the wine within the cup of joy is lessened
When we pour ten drops for the plagues upon Egypt."


Reader

Like the plagues of our ancestors' time in Egypt, modern life has its plagues as well. In this ritual the cup of wine we enjoy at this seder is diminished because, in our time as well, the freedom, health, and lives of others are curtailed. Each drop of wine we pour represents the hope and prayer that people will cast out the plagues that threaten everyone everywhere they are found.beginning in our own hearts.

The making of war,
the teaching of hate and violence,
despoliation of the earth
perversion of justice and of government,
fomenting of vice and crime,
neglect of human needs,
oppression of nations and peoples,
corruption of culture,
subjugation of science, learning, and human discourse,
the erosion of freedoms.


Reader

We pour 10 drops for the plagues upon Egypt. As I call out each plague, each of us should dip his or her finger into the wine, a symbol of regret that the victory had to be purchased through another's misfortune.

Dam, Blood
Tzfardeah, Frogs
Kinim, Lice
Arov, Wild Beasts
Dever, Blight
Sh'hin, Boils
Barad, Hail
Arbeh, Locusts
Hoshech, Darkness
Makat b'chorot, Slaying of the Firstborn

After the final plague, Pharaoh let the Israelites go. They left Egypt in the middle of the night, with the full moon as their guide, and they walked to the shores of the Red Sea.

We are grateful for all the wonderful things that God did for us. He brought us out of Egypt; He gave us the Ten Commandments, gave us the Torah, and led us into the land of Israel.

Reader

"Dayenu

We have a song about these wonderful things called "Dayenu," which means: "It would have satisfied us"...any one of these things would have been enough.

The traditional Haggadah says that it would have been enough for God to take us out of Egypt.

It would have been enough to bring us through the Red Sea, enough to give us the Torah and Shabbat, enough to bring us into the land of Israel.

While we count each of these blessings as if it would have been enough on its own, we know that more was given, and more is promised.

All

Da-dayenu, da-dayenu, da-da-yenu, dayenu dayenu.
I-lu ho-tzi, ho-tzi-a-nu,
ho-tzianu mi Mitzrayim,
hotzianu mi Mitzrayim,
Dayenu.


Da-dayenu, da-dayenu, da-dayenu, dayenu dayenu.

I-lu na-tan, na-tan la-nu,
na-tan la-nu et ha-sha-bat,
na-tan la-nu et ha-sha-bat,
Dayenu.


Da-dayenu, da-dayenu, da-dayenu, dayenu dayenu.

E-lu natan, natan lanu
natan lanu et ha-torah,
et ha-torah natan lanu,
Dayenu.


Da-dayenu, da-dayenu, da-dayenu, dayenu dayenu.

Reader

This year, when bigots still try to prove that the Holocaust never happened, it is fitting that we recall this passage from the "Diary of Anne Frank":
"That's the difficulty in these times: ideals, dreams, and cherished hopes rise within us, only to meet the horrible truth and be shattered. It's really a wonder that I haven't dropped all my ideals, because they seem so absurd and impossible to carry out. Yet I keep them, because in spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart. I simply can't build up my hopes on a foundation consisting of confusion, misery and death. I see the world gradually being turned into a wilderness. I hear the ever approaching thunder, which will destroy us too. I can feel the sufferings of millions and yet, if I look up into the heavens, I think that it will all come right, that this cruelty too will end, and that peace and tranquility will return again.

"In the meantime, I must uphold my ideals, for perhaps the time will come when I shall be able to carry them out."


We hope that all people will one day be able to celebrate the meaning, and the symbol of Passover, including Jews in other countries who are persecuted because of their religion. .
(wine glasses are filled; drink some wine)

Leader

For us here at this table, on this day, let us enjoy our companionship and good spirit. Let us rejoice at the wonder of our deliverance of old from bondage to freedom, from agony to joy, from mourning to festivity, from darkness to light, from servitude to redemption. Before God, let us ever sing a new song.

Elijah the Prophet and Miriam the Prophet

At this time, we fill our glasses with wine again. But this time, we fill an extra cup, the Cup of Elijah the Prophet. In Jewish tradition, Elijah is the long awaited messenger of the final redemption of humanity from all oppression. In the tradition of women's seders, the memory of Miriam the Prophet has been linked with that of Elijah. Miriam foresaw the birth of her brother, Moses, and according to teachings of the midrash, was responsible for finding the wells in the wilderness that served as way stations on our people's journey.

(The door is opened, symbolically, for Elijah.)

Song

Eliyahu Ha-navi
Eliyahu Ha-tishbi
Eliyahu, Eliyahu.
Eliyahu Ha-giladi.
Bim'-hey-ra b'yameynu
Ya-vo eleynu
Im Mashiah ben David,
Im Mashiah ben David.

And now we eat!!

After the Meal

The Afikomen

(After the meal ends, the children go to find the Afikomen and receive their just rewards. Then everyone eats a piece of the Afikomen.)

Concluding the Seder

All

How does the journey to freedom continue?

Reader

Following fire and cloud, we stumble, shivering with cold and fear.

Some will always cry out for Egypt, longing to return to the known.

All

How does the journey to freedom continue?

Reader

Risking together what we never imagined possible on our own, we keep walking. The sea rises to our nostrils. Then, with a breath, the waters part.

All

How does the journey to freedom continue?

Reader

We build fragile shelters and watch as they sway in the wind. Aching for song, our throats are parched. The water is too bitter to drink. Even manna sometimes takes like sand.

All

But ours is a holy journey. We falter but will not turn back. Embracing the challenge of tradition, we clear new paths to the future. Ours is holy journey, a journey towards new life.

Leader

Our God and God of our ancestors, be You ever mindful of us, as You have been of our fathers and mothers. Grant us grace, mercy, life and peace on this Feast of unleavened bread.

All

Amen.

Leader

Remember us this day in kindness.

All

Amen.

Leader

Visit us this day with blessing.

All

Amen.

Leader

Preserve us this day for life.

All

Amen.

Leader

The Seder service now concludes: its rites observed in full, its purposes revealed. Let us all join hands in love and friendship.

This privilege we share will ever be renewed.
Until God's plan is known in full,
His highest blessing sealed.

Peace!
Peace for us! For everyone!

For all people, this, our hope:
Next year in Jerusalem!
Next year, may all be free!
Song: "Chad Gadya" (One Kid)

Chad gadya, chad gadya,
dizvan abah bitrei zuzei.
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

V'ata shunra, v'achla l'gadya,
dizvan abah bitrei zuzei.
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

V'ata chalba, v'nashach l'shunra, d'achla l'gadya,
dizvan abah bitrei zuzei.
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

V'ata chutra, v'hikah l'chalba, d'nashach l'shunra, d'achla l'gadya, dizvan abah bitrei zuzei. Chad gadya, chad gadya. V'ata nura, v'saraf l'chutra, d'hika l'kalba, d'nashach l'shunra, d'achla l'gadya,
dizvan abah bitrei zuzei.
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

V'atah maya, v'chavah l'nura, d'saraf l'chutra, d'hika l'kalba, d'nashach l'shunra, d'achla l'gadya,
dizvan abah bitrei zuzei.
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

V'atah torah, v'shatah l'maya, d'chavah l'nura, d'saraf l'chutra, d'hika l'kalba, d'nashach l'shunra, d'achla l'gadya,
dizvan abah bitrei zuzei.
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

V'atah hashochait, v'shachat l'torah, d'shatah l'maya, d'chavah l'nura, d'saraf l'chutra, d'hika l'kalba, d'nashach l'shunra, d'achla l'gadya,

dizvan abah bitrei zuzei.
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

V'atah malach hamavet, v'shachat l'shochait, d'shachat l'torah, d'shatah l'maya, d'chavah l'nura, d'saraf l'chutra, d'hika l'kalba, d'nashach l'shunra, d'achla l'gadya,
dizvan abah bitrei zuzei.
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

V'atah hakadosh baruch hu, v'shachat l'malach hamavet, d'shachat l'shochait, d'shachat l'torah, d'shatah l'maya, d'chavah l'nura, d'saraf l'chutra, d'hika l'kalba, d'nashach l'shunra, d'achla l'gadya,
dizvan abah bitrei zuzei.
Chad gadya, chad gadya. English Words: One little goat, one little goat,
that Father bought for two zuzim.
One little goat, one little goat.

Then came a cat and ate the goat,
that Father bought for two zuzim.
One little goat, one little goat.
Then came a dog and bit the cat that ate the goat,
that Father bought for two zuzim.
One little goat, one little goat.

Then came a stick and beat the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat,
that Father bought for two zuzim.
One little goat, one little goat.

Then came fire and burned the stick that beat the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat,
that Father bought for two zuzim.
One little goat, one little goat.

Then came water and quenched the fire that burned the stick that beat the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat,
that Father bought for two zuzim.
One little goat, one little goat.

Then came an ox and drank the water that quenched the fire that burned the stick that beat the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat,
that Father bought for two zuzim.
One little goat, one little goat.

Then came the Shochet and slaughtered the ox that drank the water that quenched the fire that burned the stick that beat the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat,
that Father bought for two zuzim.
One little goat, one little goat.

Then came the angel of death and killed the Shochet who slaughtered the ox that drank the water that quenched the fire that burned the stick that beat the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat,
that Father bought for two zuzim.
One little goat, one little goat.

Then came the Holy One, blessed be He, and slew the angel of death that killed the Shochet who slaughtered the ox that drank the water that quenched the fire that burned the stick that beat the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat,
that Father bought for two zuzim.
One little goat, one little goat.

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