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Virtual Talmud


Another Possibility: Jewish Peoplehood

Rabbi Stern’s presentation of the issue of Jewish status as a question of genes vs. identity is right on the mark.

Judaism has been so hard to pin down for so many people because it’s not a religion–you can certainly be Jewish without believing in God or following any Jewish practices–nor is it a race or ethnic group, since you can’t convert into a race but you can become a Jew by choice.

More than 70 years ago, Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan first attempted to address this difficulty by proposing a new definition–one I think we can still learn from today. Kaplan said that Judaism was first and foremost a civilization, meaning a cohesive group identity that included shared history, culture, rituals, values, literature and, of course, religion. The shared element that held all Jews together wasn’t genes or religious practice–it was peoplehood, meaning Jews are linked to one another by a common identity, a shared sense of belonging, that transcends any single criterion.

How does any of this relate to the question of how we as Jews welcome prospective converts? Since being Jewish is not primarily a religious identity, I don’t believe that people who convert to Judaism should be forced to jump through this or that particular religious hoop.

I think it’s reprehensible to check up on converts to see if they’re keeping kosher or keeping shabbat as some rabbis do, when these are in no way defining criteria for being Jewish. What I do believe is that those wishing to convert need to affirm and formalize their commitment to having a Jewish identity and being part of a Jewish community, the Jewish story, and the Jewish people.

Does that mean that someone could simply decide to become Jewish without conversion? My answer is no: One person can be born American and exercise all the rights of that identity automatically but another person who had citizenship in another country must go through a process of becoming an American citizen–formally claiming that identity through study and appropriate administrative procedures–before enjoying those same rights.

Becoming Jewish means claiming citizenship in the Jewish people–formally taking on a new identity, culture, and civilization. And I certainly hope that we can be welcoming to anyone who wishes to make a commitment to do that.



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ginavegadegomez

posted November 30, 2006 at 2:11 am


I think that to be Jew is a WAY TO THINK AND to see the world taking Tora like a schedule for the daily life; persons that practices Tora will saved from ciclical purges of mankind. The Pentateuco not only a sacred book… the Pentateuco is alive today for people that understand: every day we have a Genesis, we have an Exodos, We have a Leviticus, we have a Deutoronomy and we have a Numbers. Then to be Jew is a person that when waked up, is created again, the day begins and the person has chance to be and do things good again; then the person goes across the desert like israelites walking over the sand, a desert is a very difficult thing, there are many temptations, but the Jew trust in G-d, like history says about goog jews that always trusted crossing desert, a jew of today is resolute in his intentions crossing desert,overcoming obstacles every day, avoiding temptations; then a good jew keeps his(her) body and his(her)mind like in Leviticus, try to make kosher in all what eats and uses; remembering the commit in Deuteronomy , a jew today always keeps duty in ethic way (613 mitzva)and finally like in Numbers, jew of today take care of materials things, all things that are measure. Then to be Jew is to be able to keep the Pentateuco in literal, simbolic and ethic way.



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Hamilton Gray

posted November 30, 2006 at 11:57 pm


I think that Jewishness is not race or religion so much as it is a “family” of those who are born to that family or have been “adopted” into it over the centuries. We have Jews, who are real Jews, of every shade and hue. We also have Jews, who are real Jews, from every creed imaginable. We may not AGREE with, or even LIKE everyone in our family, but they are family. There is a long list of Jewish people whose names I would change to O’Brien, O’Mally or Johnson (not that there are not a number of Jews with those names already) but for better or worse, they are a part of that common ancestry, however that may have diverged over the centuries, however different the histories. There are of course no “pure” Jews, we all look like the nations our fathers settled in, wherever that may have been.



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Dov Weiss

posted December 1, 2006 at 1:22 pm


Rabbi Waxman – well put. Dov Weiss



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Dov Weiss

posted December 1, 2006 at 1:22 pm


Rabbi Waxman – well put. Dov Weiss



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Genie Long

posted December 1, 2006 at 4:41 pm


I am a recent convert to Judaism, coming from a Scot-Cherokee Christian background. I agree completely with Rabbi Waxman. My decision to convert to Judaism involved learning not just religious rituals, but cultural traditions as well. I learned to bake challah. I find myself using the common Yiddish words now without thinking about it. This is my first Christmas season as an official convert, and I feel the alienation of living in a society saturated with a religion not my own. While I am not an ethnic Jew, whatever that is, I am a religious Jew and I share the common peoplehood of Jews everywhere. I like the designation, Rabbi Waxman!



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Genie Long

posted December 1, 2006 at 4:41 pm


I am a recent convert to Judaism, coming from a Scot-Cherokee Christian background. I agree completely with Rabbi Waxman. My decision to convert to Judaism involved learning not just religious rituals, but cultural traditions as well. I learned to bake challah. I find myself using the common Yiddish words now without thinking about it. This is my first Christmas season as an official convert, and I feel the alienation of living in a society saturated with a religion not my own. While I am not an ethnic Jew, whatever that is, I am a religious Jew and I share the common peoplehood of Jews everywhere. I like the designation, Rabbi Waxman!



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Marian Neudel

posted December 1, 2006 at 5:45 pm


The proper analogy is probably something like being adopted into a Native American tribe. In particular, many of the Plains Indian tribes were utterly devoid of xenophobia, and had no problem with adopting anybody, as I understand it. Once adopted, a person was a tribal member with whatever that entailed.



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Marian Neudel

posted December 1, 2006 at 5:45 pm


The proper analogy is probably something like being adopted into a Native American tribe. In particular, many of the Plains Indian tribes were utterly devoid of xenophobia, and had no problem with adopting anybody, as I understand it. Once adopted, a person was a tribal member with whatever that entailed.



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Deborah

posted December 2, 2006 at 3:39 pm


Being a Jew is being God’s chosen people. It encompasses the fact that God chose them as a peculiar, set-apart people to show His glory through them. For them to be His Beloved and Him to be their God, one and only, and in that raised to glory and honor themselves. It is everything you think of, the land, the family, talents, faith, obedience,laughter, love, singing, dancing, worshipping the Lord in everything, celebrating the life that only the Lord God of Israel can give. Romans 10:12 For there is no difference between Jew and Gentile-the same Lord is Lord of all and richly blesses all who call on him, v13 for,”Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.” Meaning if we obey the will of the Lord, we are no different one from the other as far as God’s love goes. We will share in many or all of the promises of the Jews if we love the Lord and are obedient to Him, but Jews by birth are Jews only, from a Jewish mother, the ‘son of promise’, by a Jewish father only, the ‘son of slavery’, as in the case of Ishmael, but when Christ came he abolished those hostilities, and even those of Ishmael may choose freedom instead of slavery of bondage, oppression, and hostilities. If they do not, for the ‘old’ Jews of the Ishmaelite line, unless married to a Christian, stay stuck as ‘the son of slavery’, but there is a choice as long as there is breath in our bodies. I like the differences of the Jews and the Gentiles very much, and then of course the fact that we share the one and only God, who now has accepted Gentile Christians as His Beloveds, also. ‘God gives sleep to His Beloved.’ Because of the awesomeness of God and His chosen people, the Jews, as I have always loved from afar, I have to be careful to keep them in proper perspective, keeping them ‘off a pedestal’ and I really do that very well. However, I see the clearness of the pure Israelite in all human frailties, and glory and honor. Some of what I write is according to my knowledge and understanding to date, so please search out anything I say, in the scripture. God never changes, but God allows for change and changes His mind whenever He so desires and needs to. thank God! Smile



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Deborah

posted December 2, 2006 at 3:39 pm


Being a Jew is being God’s chosen people. It encompasses the fact that God chose them as a peculiar, set-apart people to show His glory through them. For them to be His Beloved and Him to be their God, one and only, and in that raised to glory and honor themselves. It is everything you think of, the land, the family, talents, faith, obedience,laughter, love, singing, dancing, worshipping the Lord in everything, celebrating the life that only the Lord God of Israel can give. Romans 10:12 For there is no difference between Jew and Gentile-the same Lord is Lord of all and richly blesses all who call on him, v13 for,”Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.” Meaning if we obey the will of the Lord, we are no different one from the other as far as God’s love goes. We will share in many or all of the promises of the Jews if we love the Lord and are obedient to Him, but Jews by birth are Jews only, from a Jewish mother, the ‘son of promise’, by a Jewish father only, the ‘son of slavery’, as in the case of Ishmael, but when Christ came he abolished those hostilities, and even those of Ishmael may choose freedom instead of slavery of bondage, oppression, and hostilities. If they do not, for the ‘old’ Jews of the Ishmaelite line, unless married to a Christian, stay stuck as ‘the son of slavery’, but there is a choice as long as there is breath in our bodies. I like the differences of the Jews and the Gentiles very much, and then of course the fact that we share the one and only God, who now has accepted Gentile Christians as His Beloveds, also. ‘God gives sleep to His Beloved.’ Because of the awesomeness of God and His chosen people, the Jews, as I have always loved from afar, I have to be careful to keep them in proper perspective, keeping them ‘off a pedestal’ and I really do that very well. However, I see the clearness of the pure Israelite in all human frailties, and glory and honor. Some of what I write is according to my knowledge and understanding to date, so please search out anything I say, in the scripture. God never changes, but God allows for change and changes His mind whenever He so desires and needs to. thank God! Smile



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Robin Margolis

posted December 2, 2006 at 6:54 pm


Dear Friends: Rabbi Waxman very ably states the Reconstructionist view of Judaism as a religious civilization/peoplehood. While I am not a Reconstructionist Jew, I have always had a tremendous admiration for the innovative founder of Reconstruction, R. Mordechai Kaplan. However, as the Coordinator of the Half-Jewish Network, I would caution the Reconstructionists against thinking that the Jewish “culture/peoplehood” paradigm will hold up much longer. Most of the adult children of intermarriage I have come in contact with — including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, etc. — feel a blood/peoplehood tie to Judaism. But — their ultimate decision to live as Jews is usually a conscious acceptance of a Jewish religious world view over a competing Christian or other non-Jewish religious world view from the other side of the family. In other words, they may start out as identifying with Jewish culture, but for them to commit, they must consciously reject the religion of the Christian or other non-Jewish side of their family. They generally commit to live as Jews on the basis of the adoption of a Jewish religious world view. I am very fond of my deceased Orthodox mother’s Ashkenazi Jewish culture — but the vast majority of adult children of intermarriage are increasingly remote from the Askenazi, Sephardi, and other Jewish cultures their Jewish parent or grandparents came from, just as the third generation Irish Catholics have less and less attachment to Irish culture, and generally do not speak Gaelic. For Judaism to attract the adult children of intermarriage, it will have to prepare to evolve into more of a religion — actively competing against Christianity, Islam, etc. — and less of a culture. Among the hundreds of adult children of intermarriage I have met, only one is at all fluent in Yiddish. They are two or three generations away from the immigrant culture. Cordially, Robin Margolis



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Robin Margolis

posted December 2, 2006 at 6:54 pm


Dear Friends: Rabbi Waxman very ably states the Reconstructionist view of Judaism as a religious civilization/peoplehood. While I am not a Reconstructionist Jew, I have always had a tremendous admiration for the innovative founder of Reconstruction, R. Mordechai Kaplan. However, as the Coordinator of the Half-Jewish Network, I would caution the Reconstructionists against thinking that the Jewish “culture/peoplehood” paradigm will hold up much longer. Most of the adult children of intermarriage I have come in contact with — including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, etc. — feel a blood/peoplehood tie to Judaism. But — their ultimate decision to live as Jews is usually a conscious acceptance of a Jewish religious world view over a competing Christian or other non-Jewish religious world view from the other side of the family. In other words, they may start out as identifying with Jewish culture, but for them to commit, they must consciously reject the religion of the Christian or other non-Jewish side of their family. They generally commit to live as Jews on the basis of the adoption of a Jewish religious world view. I am very fond of my deceased Orthodox mother’s Ashkenazi Jewish culture — but the vast majority of adult children of intermarriage are increasingly remote from the Askenazi, Sephardi, and other Jewish cultures their Jewish parent or grandparents came from, just as the third generation Irish Catholics have less and less attachment to Irish culture, and generally do not speak Gaelic. For Judaism to attract the adult children of intermarriage, it will have to prepare to evolve into more of a religion — actively competing against Christianity, Islam, etc. — and less of a culture. Among the hundreds of adult children of intermarriage I have met, only one is at all fluent in Yiddish. They are two or three generations away from the immigrant culture. Cordially, Robin Margolis



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reyzl

posted December 2, 2006 at 7:54 pm


Deborah, As a liberal Jew, I say to you with all sincerity: Thanks, but no thanks. Won’t be accepting Jesus today.



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reyzl

posted December 2, 2006 at 7:54 pm


Deborah, As a liberal Jew, I say to you with all sincerity: Thanks, but no thanks. Won’t be accepting Jesus today.



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Ilene

posted December 3, 2006 at 12:47 am


If it is acceptable and acknowledged to be recognized as Jewish even if you include other traditons and practices from other religious faiths, or if a person denies Hashem, it seems that to believe in Yeshua Hamashiach and being Jewish is also acceptable. If we are a people, a community , a civilization, as well as a faith or not, the criteria fits. For some of us, born , raised, and living the life and practices of Judaism, the Brit Chadeshah makes sense. As for identity and who is a Jew, that’s me and many others who hold fast to the ways and beliefs of our fathers and our G-d and Yeshua.



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Ilene

posted December 3, 2006 at 12:47 am


If it is acceptable and acknowledged to be recognized as Jewish even if you include other traditons and practices from other religious faiths, or if a person denies Hashem, it seems that to believe in Yeshua Hamashiach and being Jewish is also acceptable. If we are a people, a community , a civilization, as well as a faith or not, the criteria fits. For some of us, born , raised, and living the life and practices of Judaism, the Brit Chadeshah makes sense. As for identity and who is a Jew, that’s me and many others who hold fast to the ways and beliefs of our fathers and our G-d and Yeshua.



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Deborah

posted December 3, 2006 at 1:07 am


I don’t believe I asked you to accept Jesus, or Yeshua, at all. Merely stated the facts as I was taught them, know them, and believe them to be, much as you are doing yourself. You don’t need to say, “No thanks” to me, and I’m not Jesus. And in true Christianity, there is no fight between the Jews and the Christians, certainly not between the purest strains of each. Since you brought up, or someone brought up Islam, they do not worship the same God. Allah is the name for a pagan moon god, long before the 1300 year captivity of the Jews to the Islamic people, and I do mean captivity in no uncertain terms. Most Islamic people do not even know this, the Jews have forgotten the the pagan god, alilah, allah, they worshipped when turned away from God, or worshipping idols, one of their downfalls throughout their own history. I have always found every possible reason or made excuses for those people, but truth is truth. It is of no concern to me if a person accepts Jesus, Yeshua, as the Messiah or not. My soul matters to ME and Jehovah, and I am not the judge, but I know who is and I know the Messiah in a personal way. As for Jewishness for the sake of Jewishness, I will say to you, “No thank you.” As for Christianity just for the word in use, or all that gets ‘hung on Christianity and Christians, not just those that call themselves Christians, I also, say, “No thanks.” The Lord in the purest form is fine with me, and his name is Yeshua, Jesus Christ, therefore I wear the name of Christ as a Christian. I can’t take any pride in myself, but I do in Yeshua, Jesus, anyday. And, I did not ask you to accept Jesus, just speaking from my own heart as you yourself do. If you say, “No thanks to Jesus, and you say, “No thanks to me, too, I am doubly blessed. Thanks



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Deborah

posted December 3, 2006 at 1:07 am


I don’t believe I asked you to accept Jesus, or Yeshua, at all. Merely stated the facts as I was taught them, know them, and believe them to be, much as you are doing yourself. You don’t need to say, “No thanks” to me, and I’m not Jesus. And in true Christianity, there is no fight between the Jews and the Christians, certainly not between the purest strains of each. Since you brought up, or someone brought up Islam, they do not worship the same God. Allah is the name for a pagan moon god, long before the 1300 year captivity of the Jews to the Islamic people, and I do mean captivity in no uncertain terms. Most Islamic people do not even know this, the Jews have forgotten the the pagan god, alilah, allah, they worshipped when turned away from God, or worshipping idols, one of their downfalls throughout their own history. I have always found every possible reason or made excuses for those people, but truth is truth. It is of no concern to me if a person accepts Jesus, Yeshua, as the Messiah or not. My soul matters to ME and Jehovah, and I am not the judge, but I know who is and I know the Messiah in a personal way. As for Jewishness for the sake of Jewishness, I will say to you, “No thank you.” As for Christianity just for the word in use, or all that gets ‘hung on Christianity and Christians, not just those that call themselves Christians, I also, say, “No thanks.” The Lord in the purest form is fine with me, and his name is Yeshua, Jesus Christ, therefore I wear the name of Christ as a Christian. I can’t take any pride in myself, but I do in Yeshua, Jesus, anyday. And, I did not ask you to accept Jesus, just speaking from my own heart as you yourself do. If you say, “No thanks to Jesus, and you say, “No thanks to me, too, I am doubly blessed. Thanks



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Deborah

posted December 3, 2006 at 1:31 am


In holding on to the Jewish culture or anyone’s culture, everything may go awry on this earth at the last, but God says, ‘Heaven and earth may pass away, but my words will never pass away.’ In the darkest of nights, or space, or even so-called nothingness, God’s words will always be found, put together, and creation again, if need be. Their will be a new Heaven and new Earth, whether a renewed one of the ones that we have now, but still new, cleansed, set aright, like a little stray lamb who is found by the shepherd and brought home to safety, warmth, and mush love, and at least hang of to Deut. 6:4,5 and the same scriptures in the N.T., Mark 12:29-31 “The most important one”, answered Jesus, “is this: ‘Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one. Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength. The second is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself. There is no commandment greater than these.” Cultures are wonderful and intersesting, but the people themselves, indiviudually and collectively are what matter the most. Change is hard on any of us, but if God wills it so, then it is for the best. I can write it, and say it easily, but it is sometimes very hard for me, too. And you never know what God has in store for those who love Him. Wonderful surprises, perfect gifts of love. Just you wait and see.



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Deborah

posted December 3, 2006 at 1:31 am


In holding on to the Jewish culture or anyone’s culture, everything may go awry on this earth at the last, but God says, ‘Heaven and earth may pass away, but my words will never pass away.’ In the darkest of nights, or space, or even so-called nothingness, God’s words will always be found, put together, and creation again, if need be. Their will be a new Heaven and new Earth, whether a renewed one of the ones that we have now, but still new, cleansed, set aright, like a little stray lamb who is found by the shepherd and brought home to safety, warmth, and mush love, and at least hang of to Deut. 6:4,5 and the same scriptures in the N.T., Mark 12:29-31 “The most important one”, answered Jesus, “is this: ‘Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one. Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength. The second is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself. There is no commandment greater than these.” Cultures are wonderful and intersesting, but the people themselves, indiviudually and collectively are what matter the most. Change is hard on any of us, but if God wills it so, then it is for the best. I can write it, and say it easily, but it is sometimes very hard for me, too. And you never know what God has in store for those who love Him. Wonderful surprises, perfect gifts of love. Just you wait and see.



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Roger

posted December 4, 2006 at 1:37 am


Dear Deborah, I agree with reyzl. Thanks but no thanks. Jews do not condemn those of other faiths, Christian, buddist moslem et. Christians do. I agree totalyt with Rabbi Waxman, and many others who wriet here.



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Roger

posted December 4, 2006 at 1:37 am


Dear Deborah, I agree with reyzl. Thanks but no thanks. Jews do not condemn those of other faiths, Christian, buddist moslem et. Christians do. I agree totalyt with Rabbi Waxman, and many others who wriet here.



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Ellen Slaughter

posted December 4, 2006 at 2:32 pm


My husband and I converted to Judaism thirty-three years ago, but I have come to dislike the term convert. After much study and searching we felt more that we found a home in the fullest sense of the word. Even if the Chief Rabbis of Israel wouldn’t accept our conversions, it is of little importance to us, we know who we are and who our family is. Shalom, Ellen



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Ellen Slaughter

posted December 4, 2006 at 2:32 pm


My husband and I converted to Judaism thirty-three years ago, but I have come to dislike the term convert. After much study and searching we felt more that we found a home in the fullest sense of the word. Even if the Chief Rabbis of Israel wouldn’t accept our conversions, it is of little importance to us, we know who we are and who our family is. Shalom, Ellen



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Tzvi

posted December 4, 2006 at 11:55 pm


In my Congregation(reconstructionist), one of our former Student rabbis, who is now a popular rabbi in Atlanta gave us a term :”Jews By Choice”. And actually at some level ALL jews are jews by choice. Even though i have a jewish mom, it would not be hard due to common culture to just walk away and join the masses. But i can’t and won’t As for the jesus stuff…Deborah, get off it. its only a reminder that non jews do not belong posting in jewish blogs,esp ones where they have no relevance to the subject. jews for Jews.



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Tzvi

posted December 4, 2006 at 11:55 pm


In my Congregation(reconstructionist), one of our former Student rabbis, who is now a popular rabbi in Atlanta gave us a term :”Jews By Choice”. And actually at some level ALL jews are jews by choice. Even though i have a jewish mom, it would not be hard due to common culture to just walk away and join the masses. But i can’t and won’t As for the jesus stuff…Deborah, get off it. its only a reminder that non jews do not belong posting in jewish blogs,esp ones where they have no relevance to the subject. jews for Jews.



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marian neudel

posted December 5, 2006 at 5:37 pm


The analogy between the Jewish people and a family is significant. Family, I have long believed, is the Holy One’s way of making us spend time and energy with people unlike ourselves, people whom we would in the ordinary course of things never choose to associate with. It’s the emotional counterpart of exogamy.



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marian neudel

posted December 5, 2006 at 5:37 pm


The analogy between the Jewish people and a family is significant. Family, I have long believed, is the Holy One’s way of making us spend time and energy with people unlike ourselves, people whom we would in the ordinary course of things never choose to associate with. It’s the emotional counterpart of exogamy.



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Yossel

posted December 5, 2006 at 9:59 pm


B”H I believe the Jewish People are a NATION. A Nation indicates a people that are bound to each other as brothers and sisters by an unbreakable bond. In the case of the Jewish people, that bond was created by G-d and G-d alone. From Avraham, Yitzchok, Yaakov, to the 12 Tribes to the Nation that was enslaved by Pharaoh and subsequently redeemed (by G-d Himself), the glue that holds us together is G-dly Glue. To quote the Talmud, since the destruction of Jerusalem, “what remains for G-d is the 4 cubits of Halacha (Jewish Law).” This defines who a Jew is, which is one born of a Jewish Mother or one who has joined our Nation accoring to Halacha. Without Halacha and the Sages who have defended and upheld it, there is, G-d forbid, nothing to hold us together. This is G-d’s will, which has endured through millenia of exiles, persecutions, inquisitions, holocausts, ad nauseum. That same Halacha says that one who becomes a Jew according to Torah law is no less a Jew than one who has a Jewish mother. However, when making the conscious choice to become a member of the Jewish People, Halacha requires commitment to the 620 laws of our Faith (613 Torah laws and 7 Rabbinic laws which have the same validity and force as Biblical Law). Yes, the moment a non-Jew immerses in the Mikvah and completes the required procedure for becoming a Jew, a “magical” spiritual transformation occurs and this person gains a Jewish soul, directly from G-d. May G-d’s presence be revealed in this physical world immediately so there will no longer be questions on the Truth and validity of the Jewish Nation in our quest to serve Him “upright in our Land,” with the immediate revelation of Moshiach Tzidkenu. The Jewish People are NOT interested in world domination, power, money, etc. as the nations of the world are brainwashed to believe. Instead, we simply wish to serve G-d in sincerity, joy, in fullest way possible with the Beit HaMikdash in our City and Moshiach, as our king and spiritual leader.



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Rick Abrams

posted December 6, 2006 at 5:16 pm


Some one said that rabbis check up one converts’ adherence to tradition?!? Now that’s one huge advantage to being BORN Jewish. magine being kicked out a Temple because you drove your BMW after sundown on Friday. What do these Jew Police do, tear up some special Jewish Identity card given to converts. I thought RAMBAM said that after they convert, it is forbidden to treat them any differently. Here’s a dilemna: Since we are a rebellious people by nature, doesn’t that mean that in order to prove that they are truly Jewish at heart and soul, the converts have to rebel against the rabbis who converted them? Rabbi: Mazel tov, you’re officially an Orthodox Jew Convert: Where can I get a ham sandwich?



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Rick Abrams

posted December 6, 2006 at 5:16 pm


Some one said that rabbis check up one converts’ adherence to tradition?!? Now that’s one huge advantage to being BORN Jewish. magine being kicked out a Temple because you drove your BMW after sundown on Friday. What do these Jew Police do, tear up some special Jewish Identity card given to converts. I thought RAMBAM said that after they convert, it is forbidden to treat them any differently. Here’s a dilemna: Since we are a rebellious people by nature, doesn’t that mean that in order to prove that they are truly Jewish at heart and soul, the converts have to rebel against the rabbis who converted them? Rabbi: Mazel tov, you’re officially an Orthodox Jew Convert: Where can I get a ham sandwich?



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