Virtual Talmud

Virtual Talmud


The End of War

We have entered into a new stage in Middle East crises: The End of War.

Yes that’s right: THERE IS NO WAR IN GAZA OR LEBANON.

Let me explain. War is defined by the possibility of peace. If there is no possibility of peace, all we are left with is mayhem and violence.

When dealing with nation states, there was always an option of a peace treaty or, at the very least, one side wining the war and the other side being forced to submit to the jurisdiction and laws of another group. For the rank and file of a losing army or your average civilian, making peace with a foreign power was better than death. When World War II ended, the Germans and the Japanese allowed the United States and Russia to take over their countries and rebuild their governments.

With Hezbollah and Hamas, peace is not an option. Actually, these groups aren’t working even within that framework. For them it’s either “life” or “death.” Death in some sense has replaced peace as a more desirable option. Until the last Israeli or Jew is killed, their struggle will continue and the world will continue to suffer.

The notion that Israel can win a war against these groups is absurd. The notion that these groups through diplomatic pressure will somehow submit or give up their weapons is absurd. The notion that razing buildings, bombing airports, killing civilians, and threatening governments with sanctions will somehow stop the terror is ultimately absurd (by the way, for almost minute-to-minute updates on the ground in Haifa go to http://www.kishkushim.blogspot.com/ ).

For those who live in a world of life or death, there are only two options, life or death.

Suffice it to say, we are running our of options very quickly.



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eastcoastlady

posted July 17, 2006 at 7:39 pm


The notion that razing buildings, bombing airports, killing civilians, and threatening governments with sanctions will somehow stop the terror is ultimately absurd Okay, fine. Then what’s your suggestion? Enable the terrorist haters to continue their missions of rampage, destruction and murder? Wait for the U.N. to step in? I vote for disabling the infratstructure of the terrorists until the world steps in and makes the truly responsible parties, Hamas and Hezbollah, stop their insane behavior.



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Marian

posted July 17, 2006 at 7:59 pm


I keep hearing the UN and Bush and the EU urging Israel to exercise restraint. Am I missing something, or is NOBODY urging Hezbollah to exercise restraint? Are we just writing off their moral responsibility as a kind of “boys-will-be-boys”? Heretofore I have considered myself a pacifist. But since when are Jews supposed to be peaceable when the rest of the world apparently thinks bombing our cities is okay?



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gary lee

posted July 19, 2006 at 4:59 am


considering that israel razed all the buildings in gaza on their way out, and then refused to engage with palestines legally elected representatives, and continues to do the lion’s share of agression, i think they are the ones who need to excersize restraint. of course i will probably be branded an anti-semite for not giving carte blanche to act like guests that over stayed their welcome.



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Web Speak

posted July 19, 2006 at 6:02 am


Well at the rate that people put their will and ego up higher than G_d’s there problably won’t be peace. Yet I wonder if, all including Isrealies where to put this matter into the hands of God what would happen.



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eastcoastlady

posted July 19, 2006 at 3:13 pm


considering that israel razed all the buildings in gaza on their way out, and then refused to engage with palestines legally elected representatives, and continues to do the lion’s share of agression, i think they are the ones who need to excersize restraint. We don’t need to call you an anti-semite when bald-faced liar will do. Israel did not raze buildings. The Palestinians, however, did destroy synagogues and other buildings and dance on their ruins.



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