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posted by awelborn

My reaction?
Very glad that the barrier has been broken. Looking for more barriers being broken in the future.
Palin-Jindal 2012?
Sitting in Birmingham, just miles away from the church where four little girls were blown up just a few decades ago and the streets where Democratic National Committeeman Bull Connor let loose his dogs and firehoses, there is a feeling of…what… relief.  Yes, relief, and a certain sense of gladness for the moment as it is.

But the feeling is mitigated by the politics of the man elected as well as the campaign he headed, and I don’t think that wariness and sadness merits an apology. If the man’s policies and promises sadden and give us pause, are we required to bury that now?
On message, yes. Unflappable, yes. But I disagree with most of his policy proposals at one level or another and believe the campaign was anything but noble. No campaign is without fault, and most are full of fault, and the Obama campaign was no different. In other words, it was not an admirable rise, in my opinion. The achievement is marred by  dissembling about the candidate’s past,  dishonesty and vitriol from surrogates, a viciousness which was never reigned in by the campaign, as well as near-cultishness and sycophancy for a very inexperienced candidate.
And I’m not going to apologize for that qualification. Because I know full well that those who would scold about ruining the moment by consideration of such little things like policy would not – would not – be joyously basking in the historic moment if Sarah Palin were now the vice-president elect. Or president, it goes without saying. Not for a second. In fact, they would be infuriated.
So here we are. It will be interesting to see what the Republican party does now and who will be blamed. In one sense, it is obvious – Republicans in Congress abandoned all pretense of fiscal responsibility and conservatism of late. George Bush. A loss of any sense of who their constituents are, and a paralysis in terms of message for fear of alienating either the base or the Mythic Independents Who Would Save Us All. George Bush.
The moment for the GOP is critical – it’s almost a tipping point moment, it seems.  Has the moment for smaller government passed? Are the majority of us now ready, willing and able to dole out more taxes, thinking either that we have no choice if we want our Social Security and Medicare or that there is really no other way if we want to have more accessible and affordable health care or an economy less susceptible to volatility and catastrophic loss?
Is there any reason for the GOP to even exist?
Well, almost half of the electorate obviously thinks so. But what is it that we are voting for – or against?
I am quite disappointed, from a policy perspective, that Obama won the election. I’m fearful of what his presidency will mean on many issues, particularly that of life as well as religious freedom and transparency in government. It’s bad enough, but the way the Obama campaign was run gives no hope that transparency and accountability will be a priority. Remember – the power of a presidential administration is really not so much in the legislation it supports and signs, but in the way it can shape the machinery of government, from the HHS to the judiciary. A lot can happen there.
But I am also a bit energized. Partly because my mind is finally freed up from election obsession and I can concentrate on work again. But partly because this election, even as it has muddied some things, seems to have clarified others – or at least begun the process. I think, very importantly, it has revealed the necessity and importance of Catholics re-thinking how they think about politics and policy, regarding life issues and beyond, one that is less tied to party affiliation than before, that is willing to stand and challenge the assumptions brought to the table by all parties.
Oh, I know – some have tightened those party ties. And we certainly do look forward to all of those strong pro-life voices advocating for the unborn and pregnant women in the Obama adminstration. We do. Our ears will be wide open, listening for it. Keep us posted.
More on that Catholic angle in a bit.
Update: Aimee Milburn on a “Deadly Irony.”



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Memphis Aggie

posted November 5, 2008 at 8:43 am


I have some of the same mixed feelings. I’m surprised to find I’m happy and optimistic about the milestone and I’m less worried and disappointed than I expected to be. I’m sure they’ll be policy disagreements in the future but for right now at least there’s a silver lining.
If FOCA passes however it’ll be a different story.



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Curmudgeon

posted November 5, 2008 at 8:46 am


Every commentator out there is talking “historic” for about ten reasons – racial, ethnic, branding a generation, the shift in the burbs, the shift among college educated whites, all of it.
I really, really hope that the next step in pro-life politics is infiltration. Infiltrate on the ground. Get on board with Dem candidates. Work in small steps, not insisting from the get go on complete purity in every candidate.
I think the GOP played this movement like a fiddle, even though it was pretty much absent as a wedge issue in this election. But, the GOP is going to be reconstructing itself for a generation. (I’m thinking 1932 proportions here.)
If that is the case, the Dems are the go-to folks. Transform from within. It is the only hope.
I am, in retrospect, a little tired of the ‘Catholics are politically homeless’ bit. I’m saying “build yourself a ‘home’ in a new place.”
Because politics are politics. And if local Dem candidates (state house, governor, Congress) know that a good chunk of their support is coming from people who at least agree on some abortion restriction (small steps) and some who are for abolition of abortion (the prize), they will move in that direction and court that vote. (And hopefully move the agenda.) And they, folks, are going to be the ones with political power for a good while in a lot of places.



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Irenaeus

posted November 5, 2008 at 8:50 am


We’ll see if “pro-life Dems” *cough* like Bob Casey jr. have the cojones to put their votes where their mouths were when FOCA and such comes up.
How about Welborn-Shea 2012?



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Linas

posted November 5, 2008 at 8:53 am


Although I could not vote for him, I sincerely pray that Barack Obama will be able to bring a Richard Nixon/China or Bill Clinton/Welfare Reform to the issue of abortion. There is nothing in his record or rhetoric to suggest that, but God does work in mysterious ways.



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Jim

posted November 5, 2008 at 8:56 am


Nothing will be more interesting in the days ahead than finding out how Catholics actually voted. I’m seeing claims in the blogs already both ways: both that they followed the Bishops’ lead and that they repudiated the Bishops.
I suppose it will be a week or so before reliable figures come out.



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Chris Sands

posted November 5, 2008 at 8:57 am


From a UK reader a big thanks for restraining from being absorbed in the US elections. They seem to go on for such a long time.
My observation is the same as I would have here in the UK. We must come up with a way that Pro Life policies are not just restricted to one political party, they must become the common sense view, that all political parties agree would be madness to ignore. This is the role that the Catholic Church can play in all societies.
L



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Clayton

posted November 5, 2008 at 9:05 am


As usual, a reasoned response.
I think the first duty of Catholics should be to pick up a copy of Chaput’s book Render Unto Caesar.
One of my favorite quotes from the first chapter:
One of the lessons we need to learn from the last fifty years is that a preferred American “Catholic” party doesn’t exist. The sooner Catholics feel at home in any political party, the sooner that party begins to take them for granted and then to ignore their concerns. Party loyalty is a dead end. It’s a lethal form of laziness. Issues matter. Character matters. Acting on principle matters. The sound bite and the slogan do not matter. They belong to a vocabulary of the herd, and human beings deserve better. Real freedom demands an ability to think, and a great deal of modern life seems deliberately designed to discourage that.
This book will not feed anyone’s nostalgia for a Catholic golden age. The past usually looks better as it fades in the rearview mirror. Art Buchwald once said that if you like nostalgia, pretend today is yesterday and then go out and have a great time. I agree. After listening to some ten thousand personal confessions over thirty-seven years of priesthood, I’m very confident that the details of daily life change over time, but human nature doesn’t. We’ve seen better and worse times to be Catholic in the United States than the present. But today is the time in which we need to work.



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Clare Krishan

posted November 5, 2008 at 9:20 am


Was anyone else freaked out by Mrs Obama’s party frock?
The long distance camera angle rendered the colored embellishments as two distinct scarlet fields with the appearance (in my “1-issue” mind’s eye) of a goulish maidservant in a bloodied apron . . .
Laudatory as it is that America has crossed its race Rubicon, lets not forget that the bosoms/wombs of an unacceptably large number of its female citizens have been wounded by “the mark of Cain”– the symbolism of that choice of outfit has been seared into my memory of this historic night.



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Beth

posted November 5, 2008 at 9:30 am


“… all of those strong pro-life voices advocating for the unborn and pregnant women in the Obama administration.”
Maybe I missed something, but who are these people? I have heard nothing from any of Obama’s people to suggest anything but a strong pro-abortion platform.
Sarcasm, Beth. Sarcasm.



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Estiel

posted November 5, 2008 at 9:34 am


Yes. My Lord, it was perfectly dreadful! She could use some fashion pointers from Sarah.



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Blake Helgoth

posted November 5, 2008 at 9:36 am


Well, I can’t say I understand the awe of the moment. Finally, an african-american (or what ever the current pc term is). Race was never an issue for me and for most people I know. It was always about policy. I am fearful for what lies ahead, in the courts, in the policies, in foriegn relations, etc. I guess that all those who said that we have already lost the abortion battle were right. I struggle with all the energy / money that has been but into the pro-life movement. Would we have been better off if we had focussed our energy on evangelization? Maybe we should face the facts, we are just tourists here. This is not our homeland. Of course we must be involved with politics and formation of policy. I just wonder if we had things out of balance. On the other hand, I wonder if we put too much trust in politics because it was more convenient and less messy than simply taking to the streets and declaring that enough was enough, as the civil rights movement did. Maybe we are too willing to stay in our homes and in our parishes and even have occassional peacful / prayful demonstrations. Maybe we need the courage of the civil rights movement, no matter the cost. One thing that I do know – we must dive into prayer so that we can be transformed. Otherwise, we will never be able to face what lies ahead.



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Ellyn

posted November 5, 2008 at 9:37 am


Yes, Clare, I noticed it, too. I’m no fashion maven and usually have no opinion beyond, “that’s pretty.” But in this case my reaction was an audible gasp. And blood was certainly the first thought that came to mind!



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ken

posted November 5, 2008 at 10:04 am


I hope Sarah Palin retires to a quiet life in Alaska. She is one of my heros of this campaign, but she and her family do not deserve the venom spewed at them by the pro-abort, feminist Democrats.



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ron chandonia

posted November 5, 2008 at 10:10 am


I think the Obama landslide was fueled by public revulsion against two great evils condemned by Catholic social teaching: pointless war and corporate greed. Whatever blame the Democrats share for both those evils, the public pinned them on the Bush administration and the GOP generally. Sadly, the pro-life movement in this country has also become identified with the Bush administration and the GOP. The challenge now is to disentangle the principle of respect for human life from policies and practices (and, frankly, a political party) that are anything but respectful of the least among us. Since there seems no other obvious political home for pro-lifers, that will not be an easy task.



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Tara

posted November 5, 2008 at 10:13 am


” “… all of those strong pro-life voices advocating for the unborn and pregnant women in the Obama administration.”
Maybe I missed something, but who are these people? I have heard nothing from any of Obama’s people to suggest anything but a strong pro-abortion platform.”
Amy, I agree with Beth here. Who are you speaking of? I’ve heard nothing to the effect of there being such persons present/available.
Also, I agree with Blake: “Race was never an issue for me and for most people I know. It was always about policy.” Why did people not look at the character and policies of this person more?
As I added to Beth’s comment – sarcasm. Sarcasm.



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Marc

posted November 5, 2008 at 10:28 am


The political angle of the pro-life strategy will be dead and buried when the octagenarian SCOTUS justices are replaced with other, younger justices in early 2009. And yet, I can’t help but think that this may be the point of Grace that God will use to finally bring this country out of its insane love for the culture of death. Perhaps now, we will focus more exclusively on changing the culture in our families, parishes, schools, and other local areas.
As you repeatedly point out, the pro-life cause has never been exclusively political, but I think it has been hampered by an over-reliance on political means, partly because it distracts from other, more local levels and mostly because the public image of the pro-life movement is Mrs. Brown and not Mrs. A (a local crisis pregnancy center worker). Once that public image is changed, perhaps people will be able to see the truth, goodness, and beauty in the culture of life more clearly.



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JohnE

posted November 5, 2008 at 10:28 am


As Father Pavone said, “The issue is not so much who is sitting in the White House, but who is sitting in your own house.”
We need to stop complaining and get to work. Pray in front of an abortion clinic during the 40 Days for Life campaign; write to your leaders and to the editors; run for office; run for school board; do something.



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Marc

posted November 5, 2008 at 10:30 am


PS. Pray for our new president. If the essence of the culture of death is the treatment of people as things, then I think it is fair to say the insane treatment GWB received from most of the left is a symptom of that culture of death. Let’s treat President Obama better than we treated President Bush.



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Irenaeus

posted November 5, 2008 at 10:31 am


“Sadly, the pro-life movement in this country has also become identified with the Bush administration and the GOP. ”
What choice did we really have, when the Dems went pro-abort a generation or so ago? We got kicked out, as it were. We weren’t welcome. See here and >here for the story. Remember, Bob Casey Sr. was not allowed to speak at the 1992 Dem convention because he was pro-life. It’s not like we had the choice between two parties, and being the Neocons we were we just had to choose the GOP. The Dems are currently and have been a party of death no Christian can support, and the GOP has included us in their big tent.



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Lori

posted November 5, 2008 at 10:41 am


I thought Mrs. Obama’s dress made her look like a black widow spider…the red hourglass shape on the front of her dress was horrifying.



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anon grad student

posted November 5, 2008 at 12:04 pm


Usually a lurker (and one with liberal feminist leaning tendancies…) but a few thoughts from another perspective:
It was said that Liberals would not be as gracious over a Sarah Palin win, which is true. But not because she was conservative, or because liberals can’t be congratualtory towards conservative women. But first, because her very selection was the epitome of patronizing sexism. She was not choosen for qualifications, knowledge, intelligence, or experience. She was choose to the pander to women, under the assumption that we are too stoopid to tell the difference between her and Hillary on the issues and will just vote for anything in a skirt. It was patriarchalism at its worst. Second, once on the campaign trail, she appealed to America’s worst demons. She was choosen to be a culture warrior. She was divisive. She deliberately appealed to angry rednecks and refered to entire swaths of America – blue states, urbanites, the educated, etc (of which I am a part) as not “Real Americans”, even though we were more than real enough to be attacked by terrorists. Finally, she promoted policies which were bad for women, and seemed to have contempt for the privacy of our personal lives and choices while asking the same for herself.
that aside, I think that the pro-life movement, as a political cause, is done. With the exception of gay marriage, the culture wars are done, and even the issue of gay marriage will eventually liberalize as my generation comes of age. The use of contraception to regulate fertility is almost universal, and legal abortion is not going anywhere; although abortion is not something anyone likes, when push comes to shove, most women, even pro-life leaning women, are not going to surrender a legal right to their choice “just in case”. Its one thing to say “abortion is wrong, I would never do it”. Its a whole ‘nother thing to legally eliminate the option (safely, at least, since underground abortion will always exist). Besides, abortion can be done medically now, which makes if harder to regulate. And there are still circumstances when a pregnancy threatens a woman’s life or health, or where the choice involves a severely disabled fetus, and women aren’t about to give up a right to a choice in those circumstances. I can’t imagine anything more violating than having NO CHOICES when given bad news by a doctor, and neither can most other American women. As soon as a serious discussion of what illegal abortion entails ensues in this country, people become pro-choice. Just look at conservative South Dakota; the minute abortion becoming illegal actually was discussed, it was soundly rejected.
However, abortion rates are drastically reduced by many means other than the law; better access to birth control, economic stability, better health care, and empowerment for women in other areas of their lives all lead to MUCH less abortion. It is no accident that some of the lowest rates of abortion are in places like the Netherlands. Due to the above factors, abortion rates in the US have been going down for years. Abortion is extremely rare among well educated, economically stable, empowered women who have access to birth control. Now we just need to extend those conditions to the working and lower class, and abortion will further decline. It will NEVER fully be eliminated (it’s always existed, long before 1973), but I do think that abortion will become very rare in the future.
The culture wars are largely done because the changes have become permanent. Marriage has become about love and companionship. Women enjoy full social and economic participation. The divorce rate is going down. Families LIKE being able to space their children with contraception. Young people have premarital sex, are able to avoid “consequences” with pretty good reliability (if they make the effort), and still get married, stay married, and have nice families. Although there are still a lot of the same problems in the lower and working classes that there always have been, the middle and upper classes have low divorce rates, low rates of STDs, happier marriages then they used to, low rates of teen pregnancy and abortion, and are largely living good, happy lives. The vast majority of Americans are happy with the social and cultural structure of their lives, and the freedom that the liberal side of the culture wars won for them, and they are not about to give it up. No one wants to go back to the 50s. Middle and upper class young people also live and move in a more diverse world where they have friends of ALL religions; Christianity is becoming more of a personal choice and less of a cultural glue that binds Americans.
The sound defeat of Republicans, largely because of Sarah Palin, was a final defeat for social conservatism and the culture war. Social issues already rate far down on the list of things that most Americans care about. Rather than get picked up by another party, social conservatism will become isolated among rural working classes, and politics will become primarily about economic and security issues. Culture wars have become too toxic in politics; the parties won’t want to touch it.
If you want to live the code of your religion, you will always be free to do so in your communities, families, and churches, and at that level they will do more good. But Americans I think have rejected those issues being imposed by the government, because we value our freedom way too much. Social conservatism will become a matter of personal choice and lifestyle rather than something imposed on other people. Christians need to rely on personal evanglelism and free converts, not the law, to advance their ideals. And I think both Christianity and America will be stronger for it.
Don;t mean to stir things up, just wanted to give a different perspective.



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Headless Unicorn Guy

posted November 5, 2008 at 12:17 pm


And when we’ve “Choiced (TM)” ourselves into extinction, Islam will be there to pillage all our shiny toys.



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Christy

posted November 5, 2008 at 12:42 pm


If Michelle Obama’s dress was a metaphor on blood, what about Barack’s tie? The little girl’s red dress?
Get over yourselves, people. Her dress is from Narcisco Rodriguez’s 2009 collection. Perhaps not the best choice from an “isn’t that pretty?” standpoint, but not the “she’s friends with the devil” shocker some of you would like to believe. It looks better without the jacket, but seeing as Mrs. Obama is human (and anti-abortion from what I’ve read), which I know is again beyond some of your belief, she must have been cold.
I read comments like some of those above and laugh out loud. A Democrat has been elected — get those abortion tools ready! Suddenly women and girls all over the country will be running to clinics to have babies sucked out, right? I’m sure Obama will encourage it at his inauguration address: “Ladies, go get your abortions!” That is how some of your comments read. Give me a break.
President Bush received “insane treatment” from the Left as someone above said because he tanked this country, not because of his abortion stance. Sarah Palin was widely mocked because she is a lightweight who doesn’t understand policy or even read newspapers, not because she is pro-life. Stop using the abortion argument to flavor every opinion and analysis. If you want to argue against abortion and those who support “rights” to it, don’t dive to the depths of trying to convince yourself and others that anyone is actually gung-ho over abortion. They are misguided in their beliefs that it is a “right,” but they are not monsters. Nothing good comes from that stance.



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Maureen

posted November 5, 2008 at 1:27 pm


Sigh. Again with “Palin was picked because she was a woman.” The “Draft Palin” movement started because she was anti-pork, anti-corruption, anti-bad Republicans, conservative but not oddly so, interesting, and very very popular. The fact that she was also female was a lagniappe. It wasn’t started by Palin or anybody from Alaska, which got the attention of the national party leaders.
It could just as easily have been Bobby Jindal. In fact, the Draft Palin movement started because Bobby Jindal kept insisting that, darn it, he had plenty of muck to clean out of Louisiana’s Huey Long-infested house, and that he didn’t want to go anywhere until he’d had a chance to work on that. The national Republican Party had to admit that cleaning up Louisiana was important, so they let go of their initial preference.
Most of the other good ideas for VP were either busy, not terribly good on camera, not terribly likeable, sick, or had demonstrated in the primaries that the electorate wasn’t interested in them.
Meanwhile, Draft Palin was gaining momentum. So McCain and his team thought about it, and then they went with it. It was great stuff for the rank and file, especially since nobody involved with Draft Palin thought that the national party took them seriously or would have the guts to make such a logical pick. It gave the GOP cred with itself again. :)
And that’s why Palin will be back. Not because she’s a woman, but because she’s a near-perfect candidate _and_ a woman.



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Dan

posted November 5, 2008 at 2:17 pm


Palin-Jindal 2012… I’d say yes to Palin, but I’d like to think the GOP (if the GOP remains and doesn’t become something grander) should keep one of them back for 2016 or 2020 — keep at least some of your powder dry, you know. Why use them both up at once?



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Headless Unicorn Guy

posted November 5, 2008 at 3:12 pm


Get over yourselves, people. Her dress is from Narcisco Rodriguez’s 2009 collection. Perhaps not the best choice from an “isn’t that pretty?” standpoint, but not the “she’s friends with the devil” shocker some of you would like to believe. — Christy
But the color and patterning still made her look like a Black Widow Spider from any distance. Just poor choice of what to wear to the occasion, taking into account the image projected.



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Headless Unicorn Guy

posted November 5, 2008 at 3:22 pm


I really, really hope that the next step in pro-life politics is infiltration. Infiltrate on the ground. Get on board with Dem candidates. Work in small steps, not insisting from the get go on complete purity in every candidate. — Curmudgeon
Then you’ll have to have pro-life Gen-Xers to do it. Baby Boomers are a type of generation Strauss & Howe calls “Idealist”, who tend to all-or-nothing Purity of Ideology. (Like we see in both Dobson and Obama fanboys.) Gen-Xers are “Reactive”, and tend to be survivors and pragmatic tacticians.
P.S. The lead editorial cartoon in today’s local paper was a beaming Karl Marx holding a thick book marked “History” and wearing an “I Voted” sticker.



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RP Burke

posted November 5, 2008 at 3:35 pm


There is no ticket, regardless of platform or policy proposal, that I will ever vote for that has Sarah Palin’s name on it. None. I have seen quite enough, thank you. Not qualified for dog catcher. I’d vote for Tina Fey first.



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Aimee

posted November 5, 2008 at 4:24 pm


I thought the dress was ugly, but I didn’t see any abortion connotations in it. I just thought that, like many other First Ladies brought suddenly into the public eye, she’s going to have to learn how to dress.
Do you suppose they’ll scream over how much money they spend on her clothes, like they did over Sarah Palin’s? As if you can be a major public figure, and not have to be a clothes horse too, in this appearance-oriented culture of ours . . .



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JohnE

posted November 5, 2008 at 4:45 pm


“I can’t imagine anything more violating than having NO CHOICES when given bad news by a doctor.”
Try imagining yourself as an unborn baby who has been scheduled for termination. Now THAT’s violation and NO CHOICES!
The fact is that groups like Planned Parenthood prey on the fears of women. Why else would they oppose reasonable measures for waiting periods and parental notification? It restricts them from closing the sale. They need to act quickly to capitalize on that fear before women realize that they DO have choices that do not involve killing their child.
Anon, you sound like you have swallowed the bait whole. Have you looked at the abortion rates and divorce rates in our country recently? I agree that these things have been deeply embedded in our culture, but to suggest that we give up the fight to make a good and just society is absurd.
I think the culture wars are far from over. There are still plenty in America who care for more than just themselves and their pocketbooks. And as Christians we are not called to be successful, but faithful. I hope the fight does not diminish or become irrelevant, but it will surely never go away.



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Greg S

posted November 5, 2008 at 5:05 pm


RP:
Not to enter the Palin wars, but I’m assuming you voted for Obama? The eminently qualified half-term Senator from Illinois?
Ah, I see.



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Christy

posted November 5, 2008 at 7:10 pm


RE: Choice of Palin
The New Yorker ran a really good piece about this and I felt it was balanced and made sense. Palin actually got her “in” with some high-end conservative pundits (Kristol, Dick Morris, etc) when they came to Alaska in summer 2007 as part of two separate topical luxury cruises for conservatives. She invited two groups of these guys to the governor’s mansion for lunch, and they all fell in love with her and then went back to DC where they wrote about her and got people interested in her.
McCain really wanted Lieberman, if this reporter’s sources were accurate, but his aides convinced him Palin was a better choice to shore up the social conservative vote. I’m guessing he’s regretting that decision since she proved to be more of a flash in the pan than the stateswoman they needed. I also don’t understand the need to shore up the social conservative vote — they would never vote for a Democrat anyway. What he needed was a moderate to help take away those votes from Obama. Lieberman might have been that person — but hindsight is 20-20.
As for the Obama vs. Palin lack of experience contest, at least Obama is better at pretending to know more than Palin! (kidding…well, sort of)
Agreed that the dress choice for Michelle was abysmal considering she had her choice of anything in the world. Poor girl, it’s just starting for her on that front.



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Timothy

posted November 5, 2008 at 8:09 pm


Dear anon grad student,
You clearly disagree with the essential worldview of the majority of people who come to this blog, and with Amy herself, in very substantial ways. Yet, as you say, you are a lurker here.
First, I admire you for doing that — too frequently in today’s culture, especially the blogosphere, people hide within their own safe shells and don’t often venture into opposing territory. You’re to be commended and I hope you stick around, here and in related faithful blogs.
Clearly you had a lot on your chest and you felt the need to express it here. That’s interesting. I was truly saddened to hear the barely hidden disdain in your text for the working classes and those not as “educated” as you proudly proclaim yourself, as well as your uncharitable suspicion of the motives of those you disagree with politically, all words that betray a deep-set sense of pride and class superiority.
I think your lurking here and long comment might also signify something deeper, a yearning for Truth. I can tell you truly, you won’t find it in the liberal feminist ideology you have adopted. And you certainly won’t find it in grad school. You are bound to be disappointed by those pale shadows of the fullness of Truth, which can only be found in one place. Actually, it can only be found in one Person.
I’m going to be praying for you. I think you’re very intelligent, but misguided and very jaded, and that saddens me. I think that many of the social beliefs you find so attractive are ultimately lies, founded in works of darkness. And yet I also think that God just might be bringing you here to chip away at the hardened heart you presented to all of us in your lengthy comment. I don’t know. His works are beyond all of us.
But I do wish you every blessing in your journey, and pray that it may lead you ever closer to Him, the true source of all hope.



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Franklin Jennings

posted November 5, 2008 at 10:02 pm


Why am I not suprised that an anonymous grad student would not be concerned about life beyond her educated, comfortable, middle-class enclave?
The policies you celebrate harm the poor. They harm the poor in extraordinary ways. And yet you celebrate them. As someone who grew up “walking to it*” rather than having a room set aside in the house for it, during the Reagan administration no less, I find you lack of concern for the least of these repugnant.
I apologise if that is outside the bounds of politeness, but it had to be said nonetheless. Anon grad student advocates a culture that is absolutely destructive to the culture and psyches of the poor.
*”It” is the crapper.



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Daniel H. Conway

posted November 5, 2008 at 10:11 pm


“transparency in government”
I get everything else, but this… really?
After Bush and Rove and McClellan and all…really?
After torture? Really?
After the “tortured” excuse to go to war with Iraq…really?
Now with an elected Democrat, its time to comment on the worries of “transparency in government?” But be silent on this during the Bush years?
Daniel – I’ve appreciated your comments of late, but this is a reversion of sorts. Unfortunate, as well. When have I praised the Bush administration in 8 years of blogging? If I hadn’t shut that blog down, I could show you posts from February and March 2003 about the run up to war might help you change your tune and withdraw your silly implied accusations. The Obama issue is related to campaign promises of hope, change and a new politics- Rahm Emmanuel as Chief of Staff???!!! And please don’t tell me that Obama, the man who’s refused to release even his college transcripts, whose campaign will not release lists of donors..etc…etc…is all about the transparency.



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Chris M

posted November 6, 2008 at 7:44 am


“If you want to live the code of your religion, you will always be free to do so in your communities, families, and churches”
Obviously not a grad student in history…



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Previous Posts

There is nothing I shall want
A couple of weeks ago, a memorial Mass for Michael was held here in Birmingham at the Cathedral. The bishop presided and offered a very nice, even charming homily in which he first focused on the Scripture readings of the day, and then turned to Michael, whom he remembered, among other things, as on

posted 9:24:16am Mar. 05, 2009 | read full post »

Revolutionary Road - Is it just me?
Why am I the only person I know..or even "know" in the Internet sense of "knowing"  - who didn't hate it? I didn't love it, either. There was a lot wrong with it. Weak characterization. Miscasting. Anvil-wielding mentally ill prophets.But here's the thing.Whether or not Yates' original novel in

posted 9:45:04pm Mar. 04, 2009 | read full post »

Books for Lent
No, I'm not going to ask you about your Lenten reading lists...although I might.Not today, though. This post is about giving books to others. For Lent, and a long time after that. You know how it goes during Lent: Prayer, Fasting and Almsgiving, right?Well, here's a worthy recipient for your hard-

posted 9:22:07pm Mar. 04, 2009 | read full post »

Why Via Media
How about....because I'm lame and hate thinking up titles to things? No?Okay...how about...St. Benedict? Yes, yes, I know the association with Anglicanism. That wasn't invovled in my purpose in naming the joint, but if draws some Googling Episcopalians, all the better.To tell the truth, you can bl

posted 8:54:17pm Mar. 04, 2009 | read full post »

Brave Heart?
I don't know about you, but one of effects of childbirth on me was a compulsion to spill the details. All of them.The whole thing was fascinating to me, so of course I assumed everyone else should be fascinated as well in the recounting of every minute of labor, describing the intensity of discomfor

posted 10:19:45pm Mar. 03, 2009 | read full post »




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