Via Media

Via Media


The honeymoon is obviously over

posted by awelborn

In the Orlando diocese, a priest is dismissed for stealing 10,000 from the collection…

It was discovered the Rev. Marek Maczynski had taken the money from church donations, and church officials reported the missing money to the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office in early August, Brinati said.

Bishop Thomas Wenski at the chancery office in Orlando didn’t pursue litigation against Maczynski after Maczynski returned the money and issued a letter of apology to the diocese, church leaders and parishioners, Brinati said.

"When the information was first turned over to law enforcement, there was the expectation that there could be prosecution," Brinati said. "Because Father Marek did return all the money, because he was remorseful through this . . . the bishop decided not to prosecute. But he did remove him from his priestly duties."

Maczynski could not be reached for comment Monday. He had served at Holy Name of Jesus for almost a year.

The fellow was ordained in 2004…



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MysstFidei

posted August 30, 2005 at 11:37 am


The diocese obviously has a strategy of ordaining men from overseas to meet their needs. (Five of the six ordained in 2004!)
Perhaps they might want to reconsider.



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Herb Ely

posted August 30, 2005 at 11:38 am


Would he have been dismissed if he had, say, abused a child or if the dicocese had been sued for an increase in child support?



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Nancy

posted August 30, 2005 at 11:55 am


Probably not, Herb.
“Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.”



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jmurphy982@yahoo.com

posted August 30, 2005 at 3:27 pm


Yet another example of the moral bankruptcy in Orlando. Hey, only a month before you had the Brother that was busted. What’s next?



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Septimus

posted August 30, 2005 at 4:07 pm


Herb:
Had he abused a child, he would have been dismissed; and we know this to be true, because that is policy for all dioceses in the U.S., confirmed by the Holy See. And Nancy knows that full-well; so it reflects very poorly on her when she responds glibly, as she did.
What I don’t know, what I doubt you know — and if Nancy knows, she should say so — is what the Diocese of Orlando would have done, absent that policy.
I think to assume people are bad is disgraceful and frankly, unchristian. But apparently, anything goes when it comes to accusing clerics, even calumnies without foundation (which is a sin).
What we do know is that the fellow was promptly removed, and the money was returned under threat of prosecution. I suppose we could want him prosecuted; and we might wonder if the diocese had any reason not to ordain the man; but beyond that, what more do you want from the diocese?
Damning a diocese simply because it has bad apples among its clergy, is absurd. Do you really think its possible ever to keep this from happening? Anywhere? Under any bishop?



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Herb Ely

posted August 30, 2005 at 5:16 pm


Septimus, Your point is well taken. I let my cynicism over the past behavior of the bishops in protecting child abusing priests get the best of me. Let me repharase the quiestion; 15 years ago, would most bishops have protected a priest who broke his vows of celibacy and yet punished one who embezzeled money and then made amends by returning it? Sadly, I think that they would have.
But then, maybe I’m just overly disillusioned with a church that will not hold its leaders responsible for what happens under their authority.



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MysstFidei

posted August 30, 2005 at 6:31 pm


Local6 News in Orlando showed surveillance tape on tonight’s news of this priest burglarizing the church safe in the middle of the night. Apparently he had obtained the combination by hiding his own hidden camera in the room, unaware that the room was already fitted with a hidden camera!



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Nancy

posted August 30, 2005 at 7:20 pm


very fair, Septimus.



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amy

posted August 30, 2005 at 7:30 pm


mysstfidei….
I’m speechless. That’s like a bad movie. I see Jim Carrey…



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Septimus

posted August 30, 2005 at 8:22 pm


Herb:
I can appreciate your disillusionment. All I can offer is two points:
1. Given the torture we’ve all been through as Catholics (and that’s fair to say, isn’t it? Whatever disagreements we have over this or that, “the Scandal” has injured ALL of us), we have to have hope — and there is at least some reason to — that this excruciating experience is producing a new approach, a new sensibility, for us all: laity, priests, and hierarchs. We may have paid a terribly high price for it, but all the more reason to value what we paid for.
2. We must avoid the temptation to compare the awful and the ideal; we’ll never have the ideal, this side of heaven. There will never be an age when we don’t have reason for discouragement, alarm, shock or scandal; because we never have. And should we ever have a period where we really think “all is well” with the Church, God help us! because then, the problem is completely out of our sight!



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Calvin

posted August 30, 2005 at 9:24 pm


This man was the youngest of the six ordained in May of 2004. He was 28 and the others ranged in age from 37 to 57 years of age.
The oldest was Robert Vincent Reagan, Jr. As some of you may know, he was the only son of the internationally renowned opera and popular music singer, Eileen Farrell.
Please pray for Father Reagan, who after his first anniversary has already found it necessary to go to part-time duties because of health problems.
The following link has the profiles of the six men ordained in Orlando in May of 2004.
http://www.orlandodiocese.org/clergy_religious/vocations/ordination_six.htm



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meg

posted August 30, 2005 at 9:45 pm


Calvin:
I believe Amy provided that link in her post.



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Calvin

posted August 30, 2005 at 11:32 pm


Meg:
Oops, I goofed. Amy did indeed provide the link in her post. Thanks for your help.



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Herb Ely

posted August 31, 2005 at 11:40 am


Septimus, I agree that “We must avoid the temptation to compare the awful and the ideal”. But can we compare the awful with the real? Other institutions, particularly the United States Navy and Air Force have had experience with officers who abused and raped subordinates. My impression, based on new stories, some personal experience, and anecdotal evidence, is that General officers are – eventually – held accountable for abuses that take place under their command. The Air Force, in particular, is engaged in an active program to correct the abuses. The church is as well – but I don’t see the accountability for the bishops. Assuming that this is so, it seems to me to be worth discussing why it is so.



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Nancy

posted August 31, 2005 at 1:03 pm


The church is as well – but I don’t see the accountability for the bishops.
I’m no canon lawyer. I assumed that the Pope has the power to remove malfeasant bishops. Since no lay person or combination of lay people, no priest or combination of priests, and no other bishop, has that power, I assumed that episcopal accountability is to Rome.
However I have been advised by those here that the Pope does not have the power to remove a bishop either. Accordingly, I have concluded that no bishop is accountable to any earthly power or person.



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Septimus

posted August 31, 2005 at 1:15 pm


Herb:
Well, the question about bishops is deeply historical, and fraught with pitfalls.
Recall all the episodes in history with kings trying to remove bishops, or block their appointments, of heretical movements that challenged the validity of sacraments from “unworthy” clerics, or of the validity of the Church herself, if too many of her clerics were sinful, of people trying to pressure the Church this way or that . . .
All that is on top of the fundamental theological questions of holy orders, their permanence, of the fullness of the priesthood only being realized in bishops, their succession to the Apostles, etc. . . .
And I think you can see why this isn’t something you can resolve with some “mechanism.”
I’m not saying the bishops shouldn’t be accountable. For heaven’s sake, I agree they messed up! There may be a way to do it, too; but I think its wise to go slowly, even if its frustrating. And however frustrated we may be, we would be wise to tell the state: hands off!



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Herb Ely

posted August 31, 2005 at 2:04 pm


Criminal prosecutions aside, i would not advocate making Chruch leaders accountable to the state. For one thing it would probably violiate the free exercise clause of the First ammendment. James Madison was aware of the dangers of having institutions accountable only to the king. This is why the Constitution gives congress the power to raise and equip armies, make all regulations concerning them and to declare wars. The Air Force, like the church, covered up sexual abuse at the Air Force academy. This coverup continued until cadets appealed to the Senator from Colorado. At that point accountability, namely the power of the purse, kicked in and the Air force instituted reforms and investigated the commandant for the cover-up and the command climate in which it took place.
I don’t know what the accountability mechanism is, or should be, for the church. At the moment it seems that there is none.



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Marion

posted January 13, 2012 at 8:26 pm


Father Marek made a terrible mistake, but I have to say, he was wonderful with the children, gave an excellent sermon, and showed great kindness and compassion to patients in the hospital. I hope he is well wherever he is!



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