Via Media

Via Media


Photos

posted by awelborn

Some of my favorites. Click on photo for full caption:

Tonsures, ancient and new:

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cathy

posted August 21, 2005 at 12:53 pm


there is so much beauty in this …



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Donna

posted August 21, 2005 at 2:39 pm


Wonderful photos. A Catholic Mohawk – that’s a new one on me!
I noticed that the Crucifix/staff Benedict was carrying was the same one John Paul II is holding in a photograph I have of him. Is there any special significance or a story connected to it? Did earlier popes also use it? I don’t recall seeing Pope Paul with it but that’s trying to think back almost 30 years ago, and I wasn’t paying much attention to the Pope at that point anyway.



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Jonathan Carpenter

posted August 21, 2005 at 4:21 pm


Donna:
The staff you are referring to is a crosier. It is given to bishops to symbolize their roles as shepards of the church. Donna that crosier was first made and used by the late Holy Father Pope John Paul II.



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Chip

posted August 21, 2005 at 4:50 pm


What are those liturgical objects the priests in the third photo and the bishops in the fifth are holding in front of their faces?



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Chip

posted August 21, 2005 at 4:54 pm


What are those liturgical objects the priests in the third photo and the bishops in the fifth are holding in front of their faces?



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dave

posted August 21, 2005 at 5:12 pm


Thank you for posting the wonderful photos. What a wonderful event all those young people gathering together. I enjoyed the photo of the priests taking the Popes photo from up close.



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Boniface McInnes

posted August 21, 2005 at 6:28 pm


Mr. Carpenter,
If memory serves, the papal crucifix in use today was made during the time of Paul VI. His taste in art was… well, his own, to be certain.



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Kenjiro Shoda

posted August 21, 2005 at 7:06 pm


I was happy to see the young monks restoring the ancient practice of monastic tonsure. Called the “corona” in Latin because it is in fact a circlet or crown of hair this type of monastic tradition was common up until Vatican II, when it quickly became extinct, except in religious Orders founded by or in union with the SSPX (Archbishop Lefebvre).
Despite some of HIs liberal proclivities, John Paul II also gave impetus to a restoration of traditionalist Catholicism with the “Ecclesiae Dei” pronouncements allowing a return of the Tridentine Latin Mass. Many new religious Orders which use this Mass, plus also many new observant/strict Orders that practice a traditional religious life and celebrate an orthodox version of the Novus Ordo have restored the use of monastic tonsure. There are several new Franciscan, Dominican, Benedictine and Carmelite communities in Europe which have returned to this tradition. None in the USA unfortunatly…at least as far as I know.
It’s nice to see these external Catholic traditions slowly returning after being discarded by the 1960′s generation (now all aged dissidents in their late 60′s and 70′s).
Let’s hope these traditions catch on within the entire Church, and here in the USA as well.



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Donna

posted August 21, 2005 at 7:22 pm


Thanks, Jonathan C. and Boniface. I knew about crosiers (although I couldn’t remember the name).
One can take issue with Paul’s aesthetic sense, but I’m happy that the Pope still carries a staff with a crucifix. One of the most striking things I’ve noticed since I’ve returned to the Church has been the banishment of crucifixes to some side chapel in more than a few parishes around here. It’s like Christ’s manner of death has become embarrassing somehow.



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julian

posted August 21, 2005 at 8:20 pm


Swell pictures, but I wish Benedict would use the more common pallium. This one seems a bit too much like the omophorion.



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Kelly Clark

posted August 21, 2005 at 8:25 pm


The staff you are referring to is a crosier
No, it’s actually a staff. This one was designed by Paul VI with a staff, which was adopted by John Paul I, II and, now I see to my delight, Benedict XVI. The bent crossbar symbolizes, and quite dramtically, the weight of sin on the crucified Christ.
Crosiers are used by bishops. Not to pick nits, but there you are.
Personally I think the design is one of the most beautiful images I’ve ever seen. It bursts with love.



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julian

posted August 21, 2005 at 9:16 pm


“Crosiers are used by bishops. Not to pick nits, but there you are.”
Perhaps I am misreading this comment, however, the pope can use a crosier. He is, among his other titles and positions, the bishop of Rome.



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Septimus

posted August 21, 2005 at 9:16 pm


I like that staff, too — among other reasons, because it instantly reminds me of our late, beloved holy father. It is a nice, gentle way of keeping him present, for me at least.
One thing that speaks so well of our present, wonderful holy father is that he doesn’t seem to mind “standing in the shadow” of John Paul II.
Of course, being compared unfavorably to the late pope isn’t fair, but it will happen nonetheless; and Benedict seems very wise — and very humble — in just letting it be, and entrusting himself to providence.



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Teresa

posted August 21, 2005 at 9:55 pm


Just a bit of trivia regarding that staff/crozier. I recollect reading some time ago, as Holy Father John Paul II became increasingly ill, he quite literally braced himself against it. This required a refitting of the shaft in titanium to take the burden. Somehow, I find that imagery altogether fitting of JPII. He taught us so often to lay our burdens at the cross.



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Woody Jones

posted August 21, 2005 at 10:40 pm


I loved seeing the large French flag with the Sacred Heart imposed upon the white band–reminiscent of the Chartres pilgrimage, and of course a reminder of Our Lord’s request to St Margaret Mary that the King consecrate France to the Sacred Heart and place the Sacred Heart upon the flag (it would have been the white fleur de lis flag, instead of the Revolutionary Tricolor, but that is a different story). This was never done by the King, but some people take it up as their own effort, anyway.



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Housewife

posted August 21, 2005 at 11:15 pm


Absolutely beautiful. Thanks.



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dcs

posted August 22, 2005 at 9:51 am


Perhaps I am misreading this comment, however, the pope can use a crosier. He is, among his other titles and positions, the bishop of Rome.
A crosier resembles a shepherd’s crook. The Pope’s staff is not a crosier.



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Michael

posted August 24, 2005 at 1:39 am


This so called “Pope” has gone on record as denying the real presence in the eucharist. What a con man. The floods in Germany show how unhappy God is with your false “God”.



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Jmurphy982

posted August 24, 2005 at 3:25 pm


Bring back the Papal corona and throw away the horrid looking bent cross.



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john the 15th

posted March 6, 2006 at 3:24 am


i dont know how someone can look at that staff and say its beautiful. It looks demonic to me showing a bent cross . doesnt a bent cross signify something? Also how jesus is depicted dangling in a hellish way. Does anyone have any real facts about the origin of that staff?



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steve

posted May 8, 2006 at 9:44 pm


this was created by an artist from america..Gib Singleton..currently of Santa Fe, NM. his work is beautiful



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leopoldson

posted August 18, 2006 at 7:04 am


I’m looking for photos of John Paul’s Crosier showing details. Planning a wood carving. Any help would be appreciated.
leopoldson@yahoo.com



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