Truths You Can Use

Truths You Can Use

Can We Love Those Who Hurt Us?

The most repeated commandment in the entire Old Testament is “You shall not oppress the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.” It is recited in daily Jewish prayer, and describes lesson of the Israelite experience of slavery in Egypt.

passover

Does God Ask the Impossible?

If we think deeply about it, however, we also see that it is quite audacious. Its spirit has rarely played out in human history, because it rubs up against our basic human desire for vengeance.  We tend to hate those who have oppressed us

Leaders like Gandhi or Mandela are the exception rather than the rule. Both of them, and many others, drew their inspiration from ancient Israel.

From the experience of slavery, the Israelites drew not a cause for hatred, but a lesson in the basic need for dignity and freedom. They chose to empathize rather than demonize.

They chose not to define themselves as victims. They become teachers of hope.

Why Empathy Matters

Empathy is not just a nice quality to have. It is not just for people of faith. It matters to each of us. It is critical to our happiness as human beings.

George Washington Carver described why empathy matters in his beautiful words,  “How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving, and tolerant of the weak and the strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these.”

Empathy is the way we open our hearts.

To receive Rabbi Moffic’s weekly digest of Jewish wisdom, click here.

What Everybody Ought to Know about Passover: A Series

In less than a month, Jews around the world will set down for a special meal known as a Passover Seder. Begun more than 3000 years ago, as the Jewish people prepared to leave Egypt, the Seder is one of history’s most ancient continuous religious rituals.

Its story and symbolism have influenced Christianity as well. Indeed, many Christians will also sit down for a seder, either in church or in their homes, seeking to experience what Jesus and the apostles did.

christian seder
What We Will Learn

To assist both searching Jews and interested Christians, I’m going to devote several artices to uncovering the deep symbolism, richness and contemporary message of the Passover Seder.

Doing so will not only teach about an ancient Jewish ritual, but it also provides a way to explore the meaning and origins of Christian doctrine, and the way Judaism shaped Christianity in its early days.

What is Passover?

Passover celebrates the God’s gift of freedom. It begins with a gathering, usually at someone’s home, in which the story of the Israelite exodus from Egypt is retold.

The order and protocol of the this gathering is prescribed in detail. It begins with a washing of the hands, continues with cups of wines and a festive meal, and concludes with song.

Each of the 15 steps of this ceremony will be discussed during the course of our articles. Each one is ripe with symbolism and contemporary relevance for Christians and Jews.

How Does Passover Compare With Easter?

The similarities abound.

1. Both take place in the Spring: Easter has no fixed date, but as Dr. Ismar Schorsch put it, “the first council of Nicaea in 325 determined that Easter should always fall on the first Sunday after the first full moon following the vernal equinox. In consequence, Easter remained proximate to the full moon, which coincided with the start of Passover on the fifteenth of Nisan.” In other words, both holidays take place around the first full moon of Spring.

2. Both emphasize hope: Spring is a time of renewal and rebirth. In Judaism, Pasover celebrates the renewal of the Jewish people after 400 years of slavery. In Christianity, Easter celebrates the resurrection–the renewal of life–of Jesus.

3. Both holidays shape the foundations of their religions: In Judaism, recalling the Exodus of Egypt is part daily prayer, shaping our understanding of God’s role in history. For many Catholics and Protestants, the weekly sacrament of communion reenacts the last supper and transforms God’s saving grace into a living truth.

For all their similarities, Passover and Easter do diverge in many places. These differences, and their further similarities, will be explored over the next month. My hope and prayer is that we will be enriched through the wisdom and traditions of each other.

To receive Rabbi Moffic’s weekly digest of Jewish wisdom, click here.

A Rabbi’s Advice to the Next Pope

pope rabbi

The Catholic Church is at a pivotal crossroads. Many are still processing the events of the past three weeks. For the first time in 600 years, a Pope resigned.

Then just a few days before the Conclave to elect the next Pope, a Cardinal withdrew because of sexual abuse charges.

These events come on the heels of the most massive and damaging leak of insider information to the media in the history of the Church. Current reports suggest some high-ranking officials are now being wiretapped by Vatican security.

The decision made by the Cardinals, and the leadership qualities of the next Pope, will shape the world of the twenty-first century. Here is my humble advice on what qualities and values will matter most:

1. Transparency: Louis Brandeis once said that “Sunshine is the best disinfectant.” Leading an institution rocked by several scandals in an age where information flows widely and rapidly, the next Pope needs to bring in some sunshine.  

Greater transparency does not mean a change in doctrine. It does not demand any watering down of Church doctrine. It is not a call for greater liberalism.

It is simply a call for honesty. It is a call to match words with deed and hold leadership accountable to the people that make up the Church.

2. Courage: Leadership is not easy. It is even harder when you are responsibility for a 2000 year old institutions with over a billion adherents. The decisions the Pope makes will determine what kind of institution the Church will be.

While I have my own preferences, the decision is not mine. All I hope for is that whoever it is leads with courage of his convictions. This is not a time for a caretaker or a puppet for some other power. It is a time for visionary leadership.

3. Humility: The Pope traditionally wears a ring on his third finger known as the “Fisherman’s Ring.” It honors Saint Peter, a fisherman, and the early apostles, who were known as “fishers of men.”

The ring also can also symbolize the simplicity and humility of the fisherman. He must be patient, watchful and able to navigate through waves and rough currents.

He also depends on something much vaster than himself. The sea may seem empty and overwhelming at times, but it is the source of life and sustenance. So it is with the Pope (and any faith leader).

Ultimately, we do not depend on ourselves. We align ourselves with a power greater than ourselves.

It is my hope and prayer that this Power will be with the next Pope, and all those whom he leads and inspires.

To receive Rabbi Moffic’s weekly digest of Jewish wisdom, click here.

How Little Habits Can Change Your Life

little habits change your life

When meeting with couples I am preparing to marry, I often share with them a nugget of wisdom: “The little things are the big things.”

In other words, in sustaining a marriage, the daily acts we do make the greatest difference. It’s not how big or beautiful the wedding is. It’s how we express our commitment in daily life.

I thought this quote again as I finished a phenomenal book entitled The Power of Habits. Written by New York Times reporter Charles Duhigg, it demonstrates the way achieving big goals on depends on seemingly simple routines and habits.

How This Process Works

We naturally develop habits and routines because our brainpower is limited. To conserve energy and allow it to learn new practices, the brain tries to convert regular and recurring sequences of action into automatic behaviors.

Common examples include driving, showering, or tying our shoes. While complicated at first, they become engrained behaviors, and we don’t have to think about them.

This natural process has both benefits and drawbacks. A key benefit is that we do not have to exert significant mental energy on routine tasks. Anyone who has taken drivers ed knows that driving is a complex process. Yet, once it becomes routine, it does not demand the same focus. 

How To Break Bad Habits

The main drawback is that habits and routines are hard to break. Consider the habit of going to bed too late and not getting enough sleep.

This habit might be sustained by a cue (the desire to relax and enjoy ourselves after a long day at work) and a reward (the relaxing pleasure of watching our favorite late-night TV show, for example).

To break this habit we would need to change the behavior, but keep the reward. As Duhigg puts it, “If you want to get rid of a bad habit, you have to find out how to implement a healthier routine to yield the same reward.

Why We Need Faith

But even this is not enough. If all we had to do was change the behavior, breaking harmful habits would be easy. We need more.

In particular, we need faith and community. As Duhigg writes, “For a habit to stay changed, people must believe that change is possible. And most often, that belief only emerges with the help of a group.”

Faith is the most powerful habit-breaking and habit-forming tool we have. The presence of others who reinforce it makes us even stronger.
churchill habits

How Faith Helps Us Carry On

Faith also gives us the courage to carry on. In breaking bad habits or forming new ones, we will face obstacles. Our faith in our ability to change will give us the spiritual energy to succeed. Faith itself can become a powerful habit. 

Winston Churchill defined its power eloquently during the dark days of the Second World War. He was talking about Great Britain, but he could just as easily been talking about every human being:

“Sure I am that this day, we are masters of our fate; that the task which has been set before us is not above our strength; that its pangs and toils are not beyond our endurance. As long as we have faith in our own cause and an unconquerable will to win, success will not be denied us.”

To receive Rabbi Moffic’s weekly digest of Jewish wisdom, click here.

 

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