Truths You Can Use

Truths You Can Use


How To Make Sense of the Colorado Massacre

colorado shootings grief

In Judaism human beings are not tainted by an original sin. We are born, as Rabbi David Wolpe puts it, with “an original split.” We arrive with dual tendencies. Capable of profound acts of goodness, we can also choose horrific acts of evil.

The purpose of religion is to harness the good. It is to guide us toward a more sacred form of living. It is to cultivate what the Jewish sages called the yetzer hatov, the good inclination.

But sometimes we lose. Sometimes the cruelest and basest parts of the human heart inflict horror on the world. When this happens, we can rarely offer any sensible explanation. Pain pierces our platitudes.

Grief is the Price of Knowledge

Perhaps the most we can say is that grief is the price of knowledge. To be human is to know loss, tragedy and wickedness.

Recognizing this truth does not make it easier to endure. We often fall back on possible connections. In the case of the murders in Colorado, we talk about the fact that the alleged suspect was a loner. We talk about the influence of celebrity culture. We talk about our country’s lack of serious gun control laws.

All of these observations may be true. Yet, they do not explain. They do not comfort. They do not bring hope.

Let Your Sorrows Become Windows

How, then, shall we respond? What do we do? Alexander Schindler, one of the great rabbis of the twentieth century, wrote that our lives are full of “unexpected blows,” and “we must gather our heartaches” so our “sorrows become windows.” In other words, let our life experiences become sources of empathy and caring. Let us grow in our sensitivity and love.

We cannot cure the pain of those who were injured or lost loved ones in Colorado. Yet, we can show our support with calls or letters or assistance. I have been particularly moved by the news stories about survivors of the Columbine gun massacre and the shootings at Virginia Tech University who have helped one another learn to survive and cope.

Do Not Delay Joy

Three days ago Roger Ebert wrote a profound essay in the New York Times. In it he referenced a blog post by Jessica Ghawi, a survivor of a mall shooting last month in Toronto. Minutes before the shooter entered, she had been sitting at the table where he fired from.

She wrote, “I was shown how fragile life was. I saw the terror on bystanders’ faces. I saw the victims of a senseless crime. I saw lives change. I was reminded that we don’t know when or where our time on Earth will end. When or where we will breathe our last breath.”

This same woman was murdered in the theater in Aurora, Colorado. As we grieve, let us cherish her memory and wisdom.



  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment Rabbi Moffic

    Rob, point well taken. Part of my message is that we can’t really make sense of it, and accepting that and focusing on what is within our control is the closest we can come.

  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment Rob Lawson

    How does this commentary “make sense” of the horrific events in Colorado? “Life is full of unexpected blows.” Yes. In this case the blow was not a diagnosis of illness, or an earthquake, but an act done by a human being.

    Noting that bad things happen and that we must be mindful of the tenuous nature of existence, experience grief and offer support, if we can, to the friends and relatives of the victims is the basic response to any misfortune. “Making sense” of the Colorado massacre might start by pondering the implications of one of the victims in Colorado having had a brush with another mass murder.

    This horror didn’t happen by a combination of geological or meteorological forces, or by some flaws in biological makeup. The massacre was a premeditated act by a human being, of the sort that has become all-too-frequent in the last twenty years or so.

    Would “making sense” of the Colorado massacre entail some thought about how such an action came about, and how it might be averted in the future, rather than reflecting on the aftermath?

Previous Posts

The Strange Book of the Bible We Read in Sukkot
Tonight begins the Jewish “Festival of Tabernacles.” Known in Hebrew as Sukkot, we spend time in  temporary outdoor dwellings. They remind us of the fragility of life our ancestors experienced during their journey across the Sinai Desert. Vanity, Vanity, All is Vanity!  The biblical book

posted 3:57:40pm Oct. 08, 2014 | read full post »

When a Rabbi Announces He is Gay
Religious leaders are public figures. We live on display. People look at what we drive, what we eat, what we wear. Unfortunately, sometimes we hide parts of ourse

posted 8:01:44am Oct. 08, 2014 | read full post »

Is 75 the Perfect Age to Die?
Dr. Ezekiel Emauel, the well-known bioethicist and brother of the mayor of my town, argued recently in an essay in the Atlantic Monthly that 75 is the perfect age to die. After that, he said, most people have little to contribute to society and are a burden rather than a benefit. I can think of f

posted 9:02:23pm Oct. 05, 2014 | read full post »

Yom Kippur: The Happiest Day of the Year
Yom Kippur is the holiest day on the Jewish calendar. It is filled with solemn prayer, and most Jews fast. How, then, can it be the happiest day of the year? Allow me to explain... Picture the scene: It is 1944, in Glasgow, Scotland, in the midst of the Second World War. Kol Nidre is about to

posted 1:29:44pm Oct. 03, 2014 | read full post »

The Secret to Traveling Light: A Jewish Story
Once upon a time, a poor man walked from town to town. He carried a heavy load on his back. One day a wagon driver stopped his horse and offered him a ride to the next town. The grateful man said “Yes, thank you for your kindness.” After they had gone a few minutes, the wagon driver turned ar

posted 3:17:31pm Oct. 02, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.