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The Queen of My Self

The Queen of My Self

Shero Queen of Compassion

posted by Donna Henes

 
Miep Gies, the woman who sheltered the Frank family and saved Anne’s diary for posterity, was born Hermine Santruschitz in Vienna to Christian parents in 1909. In 1920 she moved to Leiden to escape food shortages and was raised by a Dutch family who moved to Amsterdam two years later. They nicknamed her Miep.

In 1933 she went to work as an office assistant for Otto Frank, who was director of a pectin producing company. Gies and her husband became family friends with the Franks and when Otto asked for help, they agreed to hide him and his family in a secret warehouse annex.

From July 1942 until August 1944 she brought them daily groceries and served as their link to the outside world. After 25 months in hiding, the Frank family was arrested but an Austrian SS officer spared Gies from captivity out of sympathy on the condition she promise not to flee.

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“There is nothing special about me,” Gies wrote in a book first published in 1987. “I have never wanted special attention. I was only willing to do what was asked of me and what seemed necessary at the time.”

Gies found Anne’s diaries in the debris left by the raid and kept them in her desk drawer without ever reading them. After the war ended, when it became clear that Anne was not coming back, she handed them over to Anne’s father.

They were published in Dutch in 1945 and in English two years later. It has been translated in 30 languages. As of this writing it is an amazon.com best seller in three categories.

This apparently inconsequential diary by a child, this “de profundis” stammered out in a child’s voice, embodies all the hideousness of fascism, more so than all the evidence of Nuremberg put together.
– Dr.Jan Romein, Dutch historian, 1946

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After the war, Queen Miep gave public speeches to keep Anne’s memory alive and she corresponded with people around the world. She also campaigned against holocaust denial and other causes. She received honors from several governments and institutions, and last year had an asteroid named after her by the International Astronomical Union. She died in 2010 at the age of 100.

Helping people who are in danger is not a matter of courage but from making a decision that every human being has to make in his life when he or she distinguishes between good and bad.
– Miep Geis

* Please send me your thoughts about power. Also stories of your own empowerment. When shared, these ideas and examples are extremely inspiring to others. Thanks.

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 ***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

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Sheroes of Women’s Herstory

posted by Donna Henes

As a follow up to our in-depth exploration of women’s relationship to power, I want to focus on highlighting some notable sheroes in women’s herstory. So for the remainder of Women’s History Month I will share the stories of some of our most admirable foremothers.

There have always been exceptional Queens, royal and otherwise — inspiring and motivating examples of monarchs, matriarchs, amazons, fabulous furies, sheroes, and prominent leaders from all cultures and walks of life — to serve as role models for us who are striving to mold ourselves in Her image of sovereignty and strength.

The mighty Queen, the great and wise, brave and compassionate woman ruler, the reigning commander of Her domain, is an expansive, expressive, accessible, energetic archetype who represents a mature female power, authority, responsibility, and influence worthy of our emulation.

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Warrior Queen Boudicca

When, in the first century AD, the Romans invaded her tribal lands in old Britain, the Celtic Queen Boudicca organized a massive general uprising by tens of thousands of men and women from different tribes in a united rebellion against the heavy-handed occupying forces of the Roman Empire.

Boudicca’s armies succeeded in capturing and reclaiming London, Colchester, and St. Albans, major cultural centers that had been Romanized. “It will not be the first time, Britons, that you have been victorious under the conduct of your queen, she proclaimed.

“For my part, I come not here as one descended from royal blood, not to fight for empire or riches, but as one of the common people, to avenge the loss of their liberty, the wrongs of myself, and my children.”

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Though the peasant insurrection was ultimately lost and the rebel troops were slaughtered, Queen Boudicca escaped with her daughters. In the end, they poisoned themselves rather than allow themselves to be captured, but the result of her campaign was, while not freedom, a more lenient Roman regime.

Brilliant Queen Hildegard of Bingen

In twelfth century Germany, at a time when women’s roles were heavily circumscribed, the Abbess Hildegard of Bingen found extraordinary ways to express her talents.

Born of nobility, Hildegard was raised and educated from the age of seven by the Benedictine nuns. At the age of forty-three, she became abbess of her community. In addition to her extensive administrative and spiritual responsibilities, she managed to pursue and excel at a mind-boggling array of disciplines.

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She was a, visionary, theologian, prophet, exorcist, healer, natural historian, hagiographer, founder of two monasteries, correspondent, confident, political advisor to kings and popes, poet, performer, author of the world’s first morality play, creator of a new language and alphabet, and composer of chants rich in mystical imagery and florid musicality that are popular even today.

A devotee of the feminine side of God, she once received a vision that counseled her, “Therefore pour out a fountain of abundance, over-flow with mysterious learning, so that those who want you to be despicable on account of Eve’s transgression may be overwhelmed by the flood of your profusion.”
    
* Please send me your thoughts about power. Also stories of your own empowerment. When shared, these ideas and examples are extremely inspiring to others. Thanks.

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 ***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

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Be A Queen: Own Your Power And Glory

posted by Donna Henes

Be A Queen: Own Your Power And Glory
By Oprah Winfrey

Be a queen. Dare to be different. Be a pioneer. Be a leader. Be the kind of woman who in the face of adversity will continue to embrace life and walk fearlessly toward the challenge.

Take it on! Be a truth seeker, and rule your domain, whatever it is — your home, your office, your family — with a loving heart.

Be a queen. Be tender. Continue to give birth to new ideas and rejoice in your womanhood.

We are daughters of God — here to teach the world how to love.

It doesn’t matter what you’ve been through, where you come from, who your parents are, or your social or economics status.

None of that matters. What matters is how you choose to love, how you choose to express that love through your work, through your family, through what you have to give to the world.

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Be a queen. Own your power and your glory.

* Please send me your thoughts about power. Also stories of your own empowerment. When shared, these ideas and examples are extremely inspiring to others. Thanks.

 ***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

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Hero/Heroine

posted by Donna Henes

Congratulations to the three winners of a copy of The Queen of My Self in yesterday’s give away:

Pegi Eyers, ON, Canada
Pam Gifford, OR
Sheri Schultz, MA

Hero/Heroine
By Rosalie Maggio, CA
 
The words “hero” and “heroine” convey subtle — and sometimes not so subtle-differences to a reader or an audience. We need to use “hero” for both men and women. In 1939, Amelia Earhart wrote:

“No one can scan the shelves of teen-age reading matter without being struck with the fact that girls are evidently not expected to join in the fun. There are no heroines following the shining paths of romantic adventure, as do the heroes of boys’ books.
 
For instance, who ever heard of a girl — a pleasant one — shipping on an oil tanker, say, finding the crew about to mutiny and saving the captain’s life (while quelling the mutiny) with a well-aimed disabling pistol shot at the leader of the gang! No, goings-on of this sort are left to masculine characters, to be lived over joyously by the boy readers.”

 
Things aren’t that different today. Once you set up women as a subset (a heroine is a female hero), there’s no longer any equality. To say that “hero” is the masculine form of the Greek word, while “heroine” is the feminine is really only useful if you are speaking Greek, which we are not.
 
Also, oddly, two of Greek mythology’s best-known lovers were named Hero and Leander, and Hero was not the manly half. Although theoretically it should be possible to use “hero” and “heroine” in a gender-fair manner, they are already subtly weighted in favor of the broader, more prestigious “hero” and, given the devaluation and discounting of woman-associated words in our language, it seems best to support one neutral term. Do you think of Norma Rae as a hero or a heroine? Joan of Arc — hero or heroine?

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Personally, I like to use the word SHERO!
 
* Please send me your thoughts about power. Also stories of your own empowerment. When shared, these ideas and examples are extremely inspiring to others. Thanks.

 ***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

http://www.donnahenes.net/queen/consult.shtml

 

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