The Queen of My Self

The Queen of My Self

The Sun

posted by Donna Henes

Blessings of the return of the sun to our (Northern Hemisphere) lives.

The Sun
By Mary Oliver 

Have you ever seen
anything
in your life
more wonderful

than the way the sun,
every evening,
relaxed and easy,
floats toward the horizon

and into the clouds or the hills,
or the rumpled sea,
and is gone–
and how it slides again

out of the blackness,
every morning,
on the other side of the world,
like a red flower

streaming upward on its heavenly oils,
say, on a morning in early summer,
at its perfect imperial distance–
and have you ever felt for anything
such wild love–
do you think there is anywhere, in any language,
a word billowing enough
for the pleasure

that fills you,
as the sun
reaches out,
as it warms you

as you stand there,
empty-handed–
or have you too
turned from this world–

or have you too
gone crazy
for power,
for things?

 ***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

 

Festivals of Light – Part 3

posted by Donna Henes

This week’s theme is the Winter Solstice and all the multicultural goddesses and festivals associated with the return of the light.

The Mayan Indians of Guatemala perform a flying pole dance, palo voladare, in honor of the old, indigenous pre-Columbian sun god. Two dancers climb a fifty-foot pole to the energetic beat of a flute and drum. At the top, they each wrap one end of an attached rope around one of their feet and leap off into the wild blue yonder. If they manage to land on their feet, the sun god will be pleased enough to start sending more light to Earth each day.

Soyal is the Winter Solstice observance of the Hopi Indians of the American Southwest. During this sacred season of solar renewal, the kachinas, the guides, the spirit helpers of the tribe, emerge from their dark kivas. They come up from the underground ceremonial spaces to join the community for the six-month period of ascending light. Fires are lit and the original creation tale is retold, re-enacted and reclaimed. This ritual participation in the process of the universe affirms and assures the continuation of the cyclical order of time. At Soyal, the sun is symbolically, ceremonially, turned back, thus renewing life for all the world.

The return of the retreating sun, which retrieves us from the dark of night, the pitch of winter, is a microcosmic recreation of the origination of the universe, the first birth of the sun. The winter solstice is an anniversary celebration of creation. It is both natural and necessary to join together in the warmth of community to welcome the return of light to a world in the dark and to rekindle the spirit of hope in our heart.

Lighting a light at the darkest time of the year is a pledge somehow. A promise. A sacred vow. Such a small, symbolic gesture. So elegantly simple. So significant. Each tentative flicker of each flame is a reminder of the fragility and pulsating persistence of the life force. Each spark, a signal flare of faith.

    
One by one, in tiny increments,
candle by candle, gesture by effort,
wish by prayer, concern by care,
we feed the life-fires of the soul
and light the infinite universe,
little by little from within.
- Donna Henes
 
***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

Festivals of Light – Part 3

This week’s theme is the Winter Solstice and all the multicultural goddesses and festivals associated with the return of the light.

The Mayan Indians of Guatemala perform a flying pole dance, palo voladare, in honor of the old, indigenous pre-Columbian sun god. Two dancers climb a fifty-foot pole to the energetic beat of a flute and drum. At the top, they each wrap one end of an attached rope around one of their feet and leap off into the wild blue yonder. If they manage to land on their feet, the sun god will be pleased enough to start sending more light to Earth each day.

Soyal is the Winter Solstice observance of the Hopi Indians of the American Southwest. During this sacred season of solar renewal, the kachinas, the guides, the spirit helpers of the tribe, emerge from their dark kivas. They come up from the underground ceremonial spaces to join the community for the six-month period of ascending light. Fires are lit and the original creation tale is retold, re-enacted and reclaimed. This ritual participation in the process of the universe affirms and assures the continuation of the cyclical order of time. At Soyal, the sun is symbolically, ceremonially, turned back, thus renewing life for all the world.

The return of the retreating sun, which retrieves us from the dark of night, the pitch of winter, is a microcosmic recreation of the origination of the universe, the first birth of the sun. The winter solstice is an anniversary celebration of creation. It is both natural and necessary to join together in the warmth of community to welcome the return of light to a world in the dark and to rekindle the spirit of hope in our heart.

Lighting a light at the darkest time of the year is a pledge somehow. A promise. A sacred vow. Such a small, symbolic gesture. So elegantly simple. So significant. Each tentative flicker of each flame is a reminder of the fragility and pulsating persistence of the life force. Each spark, a signal flare of faith.

    
One by one, in tiny increments,
candle by candle, gesture by effort,
wish by prayer, concern by care,
we feed the life-fires of the soul
and light the infinite universe,
little by little from within.

- Donna Henes
 
    

***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

 

Festivals of Light – Part 2

posted by Donna Henes

This week’s theme is the Winter Solstice and all the multicultural goddesses and festivals associated with the return of the light.

Kwanzaa is an African American holiday, which has been celebrated during the solstice season since 1966 when it was first conceived by Dr. Maulana Kerenga, a Black Studies professor and cultural nationalist. Although it is inspired by East African harvest and thanksgiving festivals — Kwanzaa means “first fruits” in Kiswahili — it is celebrated like a solstice fire festival. A major ritual element is the lighting of seven, red, black and green candles in a kinara, a holder. Each candle stands for the Seven African Principles, fundamental precepts upon which a creative, productive and successful community life is based: Umoja, unity; Kujichagulia, self-determination; Ujima, collective work; Ujamaa, shared economics; Nia, life purpose; Kuumba, creativity; Imani, faith. Beginning on December 26, they are lit alternately from left to right, one each night, until they are all aglow.

With the recognition that the solar light in the sky makes it possible for there to be life on earth, comes sincere response-ability. As the sun energizes our lives, so too, must we return energy skyward at the solstice when the winter light is failing. As Mother Teresa counsels, “To keep a lamp burning, we have to keep putting oil in it.” Now we must ask not what the sun can do for us, but rather, what we can do for the sun? It becomes imperative in fact, to do all that we can to entice, aid, abet and ensure the safe return of the sun to earth. Life depends on it.

In both imperial China and pre-Columbian Peru, it was the holy duty of the emperors to personally assure the continuation of the cosmos through their annual performance of ritual sacrifices to heaven on the winter solstice. After fasting for three days they would each emerge before the winter sunrise and proceed to the top of the Round Mound in the Temple of Heaven in Beijing and to Haucaypata, Cuzco’s ceremonial plaza. There, before retinues of their peoples, they offered libations and obeisance to the celestial center of the universe. They knelt, they bowed — the Inca blew reverent kisses — to the supreme solar source of all light.

The King of Swaziland in South Africa, the incarnation of the Sun, Himself, retires in seclusion for the period preceding the solstice. Then, on the day of the sun’s return, his warriors dance and chant in front of his compound, urging him to emerge from the dark.  

Oh Sun, source of light, love and
power in the universe
Whose radiance illuminates the whole Earth,
illuminate also our hearts
That they, too may do your work.
- Sanskrit prayer for peace.

Tomorrow: Festivals of Light – Part 3

***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

Festivals of Light

posted by Donna Henes

This week’s theme is the Winter Solstice and all the multicultural goddesses and festivals associated with the return of the light.

A common theme of solstice ceremonies everywhere is the burning of fires to symbolically re-kindle the dwindling sun. People gather together to cheer on the ascendancy of the light. The victory of the very forces of life. The Hindu Festival of Lights, Divali, comes about six weeks before the solstice. The story surrounding Divali is that Lord Rama, the hero of the Hindu epic, Ramayana, was sent into exile (read darkness), but he redeems himself by slaying the evil ten-headed demon King Ravana, who had stolen his wife, Sita, the light of his life. He is then, after fourteen years, able to return home in triumph.

On Divali, people light his way back into the fold each year and at the same time, invite the gifts of the Goddess of Prosperity and Plenty, Lakshmi. They place clusters of deyas, small clay lanterns filled with oil and a burning cotton wick, along all the pathways, garden walls, window sills and patios in a town or village. Their flickering glow, providing a warm welcome.

Chanukah, the Jewish Festival of Lights celebrated near the winter solstice, commemorates a miracle, which is a metaphor for the dwindling, then returning light of the season. The popular story goes: the stock of oil that was used to fuel the everlasting light on the altar of the temple ran low. A one-day supply was all that was left, but it was somehow able to continue burning for the eight days that it took to procure more. The eight-day Chanukah ritual involves the lightening and blessing of eight candles in a menorah, a ceremonial candelabra. One additional flame is kindled each night, mimicking the gradual gathering of light in the dark sky. For Jews, the candles represent the light of truth, the flame of freedom.

Throughout Northern Europe where the weather is more severe, the solstice fires were lit indoors. The Yule log and colored light decorations, which are today emblematic of Christmas are the same as were once lit in honor of Sulis, Sol, Sunna, the old Goddess of the Sun. In Sweden, Santa Lucia, Saint Lucy, Saint Light, is observed on December 13, the date of the Winter Solstice on the old Julian calendar. Young girls dressed in white nightgowns with crowns of lit candles in their hair parade the streets at dawn, waking people with coffee and fresh baked cakes in the spiral shape of the many-spoked sun wheel.

Morning sun, morning sun, come my way, come my way
come my way, come my way, take my pain, take my pain
take my pain, take my pain, down below, down below
down below, down below, cool waters, down below
Morning sun, morning sun, I thank you, I thank you
(Each line is repeated four times)
- Salish Chant to the Morning Sun

Tomorrow: Festivals of Light – Part 2

***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

 

Previous Posts

A Poem about Self Love
By Karen Clothier   After Octavio Paz   after chopping off all the arms that reached out to me; after boarding up all the windows and doors; after filling all the pits with poisoned water; after building my house on the rock of no, inaccessible to flattery and fear; a

posted 6:00:14am Jan. 30, 2015 | read full post »

A Meditation on My Self
Soul searching, like the practice of any devotion, requires solitude, quiet and quality time. But life is hectic and our inner needs have often been relegated to the bottom of our endless to-do lists, our dreams and desires deferred, left on the back burner to simmer. Over a hundred years ago, Fl

posted 6:00:44am Jan. 28, 2015 | read full post »

Soup for the Soul
In the stark dark of the season in the dark of the long night we are compelled to turn inward toward the center. Drawn by an irresistible magnetic force, we are pulled inside of ourselves, inside of our homes, inside of our relationships for the comfort, warmth, love, safety and peace that we seek.

posted 6:00:34am Jan. 26, 2015 | read full post »

A Self- Esteem Exercise
by Madisyn Taylor Having low self-esteem is a common issue and with some introspection you can start to loosen the grip of this negative thought pattern. Our primary relationship in life is with our selves. No one else goes through every experience in life with us. We are our one permanent com

posted 6:00:12am Jan. 23, 2015 | read full post »

Empress Energy: Extending Our Influence Out Into the World
The Queen is a mature woman who has conquered the challenges in Her life and claimed Her own royal power. She cuts through fear and ambivalence, takes charge, and establishes Herself as the sole ruler of Her Self. She has struggled for Her transformation and has achieved it. Her proud potency is pal

posted 6:00:12am Jan. 21, 2015 | read full post »


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.