The Queen of My Self

The Queen of My Self

Native Sheros – Part 1

posted by Donna Henes

On Thanksgiving, we always tell the story about how the native people
helped the pilgrims to survive and ultimately thrive in the new world.
This is well and good, but there are so many other inspiring stories
that could be told about the many purposeful, powerful Native American
women who influenced the formation of this country.

I recently came across Woman Spirit, a fascinating web page by Julia White, of Cherokee and Sioux heritage. She writes:

 “From the beginning of time, Native women have been a driving force in
their cultures. When the explorers came to the shores of North America,
they provided valuable information and services, which still carries
their mark today. Sadly, little has been written about these women, and
little is known.”

In honor of Native American Heritage Month, this week I will share in
my own words some information that I gleaned about exceptional native
Sheros thanks to Julia White’s research

Big Eyes (Tatooed Woman)
Wichitas 

Big Eyes got her name from the two tattoos underlining her eyes, making them seem huge. The facial tattoos were customary decorations for Wichitas women.

When she was a young girl living in the Red River region of what is now East Texas, Big Eyes was captured by the Tejas people and eventually sold as a slave by them to the Tiguex people of Arizona where she remained  until she was about 20 years old.

In 1540, the Spanish explorer Francisco Vasquez de Coronado came upon the Tiguex. A great battle was fought and Big Eyes was captured by the Conquistadores and given as property to Juan de Zaldivar, one of Coronado’s captains.

The Spaniards took her with them on their search for the Seven Cities of Cibola and the fabled gold to be found there. They journeyed north and then east along the Pecos and the Red Rivers. When they reached the Texas panhandle, she escaped into the familiar landscape and returned to her people, the Wichitas. She made reputation for herself as a worldly woman by relating many odd and amazing tales about her life with the Spanish and their strange ways.

In the summer of 1542, Hernando de Soto’s expedition from Florida reached the Mississippi Valley where he heard tell of the Wichitas woman who had traveled to the west and back in the company of the great Coronado. De Soto sought Big Eyes out and pressed her for information about Coronado and his travels.

She drew a map in the dirt with her finger for him. It traced the route Coronado had taken from the Rio Grande, as well as the journey she had taken from Tule Canyon back to her homeland. One of de Soto’s troops copied her map onto parchment and the route she had drawn became the first link between the expeditions of Coronado in the west, and de Soto in the east.   

Big Eye’s rendering found its way to the mapmakers of Europe who were able, for the first time, to estimate the scope of this continent. Hers was a monumental contribution to the history and physical formation of this country.

Tomorrow Native Sheros – Part 2

***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.
 

The Feast of Life

posted by Donna Henes

I am woman, a seeker after truth, knowledge and Wisdom
One who travels secretly, inwardly, on this journey of life,
One who seeks to know the Feminine,
Who seeks to know the Divine.
I hunger and thirst for inner truth
As I read voraciously,
As I feed upon the wisdom and knowledge of others
Always seeking nourishment for guidance along my own
path of discovery.
When I find such words,
I feast hungrily upon them
Until I find another who adds to the feast
And yet another …
I am refreshed by the sweet nectar
As similar thoughts flow together
To resonate with my soul.
As years flow seamlessly into years,

The urgency of living lessens.
It is my time to grow ever more deeply and
Meditate upon the feast spread before me.
I choose the choice bits
And make them my own
No longer “out there” – someone else’s thoughts
They are my soul food.
They belong to me.
Rarely do I find the words to share them,
Rarely do I find an Anam Cara to hear them.
My soul yearns and pines
For the courts of the Divine.
Only then will the feast be complete,
Only then will my soul be satiated.

Meanwhile, I journey upon Mother Earth
Seeking to nourish her and preserve her
For future generations.
I trod gently, very gently
As I enjoy glimpses of the Divine presence
In her sunsets, her gentle rains,
Her green blades of spring,
Her richness of harvest.

When I see brilliant vermilion and orange
Spread across the evening horizon,
I know they are for someone special
Who has just passed from this temporary dwelling
Into the next
And I am again enriched
By the abundance of such Divine Beauty.

-    Diane Bader

***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

The Queen is Ever Grateful

posted by Donna Henes

Look below for my Thanksgiving gift to you.*

Greetings of gratitude to all my sister Queens and ladies-in-waiting everywhere.

This daily blog has been a great joy to present, and your comments, your confidences, your confessions and your creative contributions have made it even more so. I really appreciate your continued support.

I am so thankful to be connected to this incredible Court of Kick Ass Queens™. May we continue to grow in the nourishing soil of each other’s support.

With royal appreciation,

xxQueen Mama Donna

Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life. It turns what we have into enough, and more. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos into order, confusion into clarity. It turns problems into gifts, failures into success, the unexpected into perfect timing, and mistakes into important events. Gratitude makes sense of our past, brings peace for today, and creates a vision for tomorrow.
- Melodie Beattie

A simple grateful thought turned heavenwards is the most perfect prayer.
- Doris Lessing

As each day comes to us refreshed and anew, so does my gratitude renew itself daily. The breaking of the sun over the horizon is my grateful heart dawning upon a blessed world.  
- Adabella Radici

Grow flowers of gratitude in the soil of prayer.  
- Verbena Woods

Whatever our individual troubles and challenges may be, it’s important to pause every now and then to appreciate all that we have, on every level. We need to literally “count our blessings,” give thanks for them, allow ourselves to enjoy them, and relish the experience of prosperity we already have.
- Shakti Gawain

Blessed are those that can give without remembering and receive without forgetting.
- Author Unknown

Feeling grateful or appreciative of someone or something in your life actually attracts more of the things that you appreciate and value into your life.
- Christiane Northrup

Both abundance and lack exist simultaneously in our lives, as parallel realities. It is always our conscious choice which secret garden we will tend… when we choose not to focus on what is missing from our lives but are grateful for the abundance that’s present — love, health, family, friends, work, the joys of nature and personal pursuits that bring us pleasure — the wasteland of illusion falls away and we experience Heaven on Earth.
- Sarah Ban Breathnach

Gratitude is the heart’s memory.
- French proverb

One can never pay in gratitude: one can only pay ‘in kind’ somewhere else in life.
- Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Gratitude is our most direct line to God and the angels. If we take the time, no matter how crazy and troubled we feel, we can find something to be thankful for. The more we seek gratitude, the more reason the angels will give us for gratitude and joy to exist in our lives.
- Terry Lynn Taylor

When something does not insist on being noticed, when we aren’t grabbed by the collar or struck on the skull by a presence or an event, we take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude.
- Cynthia Ozick

I thank God for my handicaps for, through them, I have found myself, my work, and my God.
- Helen Keller

Appreciation can make a day, even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary.
- Margaret Cousins

Gratitude makes sense of our past, brings peace for today, and creates a vision for tomorrow.
- Melodie Beattie

Give thanks for a little and you will find a lot.
- The Hausa of Nigeria

Gratitude helps you to grow and expand; gratitude brings joy and laughter into your life and into the lives of all those around you.
- Eileen Caddy

I am calling you all in, to be by our side…in prayers of gratitude, and especially, I have it my heart to ask you to sing for us, for all… for the good…and to make a bit of beauty and give it in joy and thanks to what we all love and serve, ardently, completely…daily, moment by moment..
 
O, may we, may I, with your help, remember that each moment is this same edge, this choice… trust, gratefulness, grief and…and praise.
-Judyth Hill

***
I am pleased to offer you a special bonus gift of an empowering affirmation,
I AM A DIVINE AND BEAUTIFUL BEING.
This lovely inspiration is delightfully designed and suitable for framing.

***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

The Queen of Thanksgiving

posted by Donna Henes

Sarah Josepha Hale was born on a farm in 1788 in Newport, New Hampshire. Her early education was provided by her mother and her brother Horatio who taught her what he had learned at Dartmouth. Later on, Hale was self-taught. She married David Hale, a young lawyer, in 1813 who was a supporter of her continued education. Together with friends they started a small literary club and Hale began experimenting with writing.

In 1822 her husband died suddenly leaving her with five children to support. In order to help her raise funds, her friends published an anonymous collection of her poetry, The Genius of Oblivion and Other Original Poems. The modest success of this volume allowed Hale to write a novel, Northwood, which also met with success. Northwood was striking in that it dealt directly with the issue of slavery.  

In 1828 she was hired to edit Ladies’ Magazine, the first American women’s magazine. She moved her family to Boston and took up the helm. Under Sarah Hale’s scrupulous editorial standards Ladies’ Magazine solicited work from female contributors, published only original material, and printed articles that were meant to improve the lives of her readers.

Her next position was editor of Godey’s Lady’s Book after Godey purchased Ladies’ Magazine. In 1837 she moved to Philadelphia and made Godey’s the leading American women’s literary and fashion periodical for the following four decades until she retired at 90. She was one of the most famous women of her time and an important and influential arbiter of American taste. She was an Oprah before her time.

“Next to genius is the power of feeling where true genius lies.”

Hale was a strong advocate for a number of causes. She consistently advocated education, exercise, property rights, and sensible fashion for women. Her championship of education for women began with her editorship of Ladies’ Magazine and continued until she retired. She is credited with helping make the founding of Vassar College acceptable to a public unaccustomed to the idea of women’s education.

Throughout her long, productive career, Hale was tireless in her championship of the advancement of women. She supported Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell’s bid to become a physician, as well as the attempts of women to become overseas missionaries. She did not join the suffragists’ call for women to enter the political arena but rather concentrated on the education and development of women.

What matter though the scorn of fools be given
If the path follow’d lead us on to heaven!

Sarah Hale wrote many novels and poems, publishing nearly fifty volumes of work by the end of her life. Her collection Poems for Our Children includes the now-famous “Mary Had a Little Lamb”, which was published in 1830 as “Mary’s Lamb.”

In addition to all her other contributions to society, Sarah Hale was responsible for making Thanksgiving a national holiday, an effort that she began in 1827.

“We have too few holidays. Thanksgiving like the Fourth of July should be considered a national festival and observed by all our people. There is a deep moral influence in these periodical seasons of rejoicing, in which whole communities participate. They bring out . . . the best sympathies in our natures.”

Hale felt that the spiritual dimension of Thanksgiving could help to prevent the insanity of civil war in America. As the hostilities heated up between North and South and the prospect of war became more immediate she bombarded both national and state officials with requests for the national holiday.

Sarah Hale doggedly wrote thousands of these letters in her own hand over a period of 36 years to five presidents: Zachary Taylor, Millard Filmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan and Abraham Lincoln. “If every state would join in Union Thanksgiving on the 24th of this month, would it not be a renewed pledge of love and loyalty to the Constitution of the United States?” Hale wrote in an 1859 editorial.

She finally found a sympathetic ear in Lincoln. In 1863 as the Civil War ravished the land President Lincoln issued his now famous Thanksgiving Proclamation in which he honored America’s blessings, even in its darkest hour.

And so it came to pass that Americans celebrate Thanksgiving together on the fourth Thursday of November each year, thanks to Queen Sarah Josepha Hale.

Grace isn’t a little prayer you chant before receiving a meal. It’s a way to live.
- Jackie Windspear

Queen Sarah died in 1879 at the age of ninety-one, a role model to the women of her time, and to us, as well.

***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

Previous Posts

The Queen of Thanksgiving
In addition to all her other contributions to society, Sarah Hale was responsible for making Thanksgiving a national holiday, an effort that she began in 1827. We have too few holidays. Thanksgiving like the Fourth of July should be considered a national festival and observed by all our people. T

posted 6:00:16am Nov. 26, 2014 | read full post »

Thanksgiving Prayer
IROQUOIS THANKSGIVING ADDRESS by Ohenton Kariwahtekwen The People Today we have gathered and we see that the cycles of life continue. We have been given the duty to live in balance and harmony with each other and all living things. So now, we bring our minds together as one as we give greetin

posted 6:00:05am Nov. 24, 2014 | read full post »

Potlatch - Encouraging Generosity
A potlatch encourages the flow of resources in a community and reaffirms the importance of community ties. We can learn much from the Native American tradition of the potlatch. It is a tradition that values generosity above all else, and a potlatch, which is a very grand ceremony, is an exercise

posted 6:00:51am Nov. 21, 2014 | read full post »

Gratitude
When we expand and grow and the situations of our lives start to flow, when the going is good and the living gets easier, it seems only natural to be thankful. But what about all those times when nothing seems to budge? When we are stuck in the rush hour traffic jam of daily life and our bodies and

posted 6:00:38am Nov. 19, 2014 | read full post »

The Universal Golden Rule
Most of us were raised with some version of The Golden Rule. “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” “Love thy neighbor as thyself.” The Golden Rule teaches that we should treat others as we, ourselves, would wish to be treated. This basic ethic is repeated in a multitude of

posted 6:00:07am Nov. 17, 2014 | read full post »


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.