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Stuff Christian Culture Likes

Stuff Christian Culture Likes

Catchphrases Archives

auf Wiedersehen

posted by Stephanie Drury

auf Wiedersehen

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#209 Perceiving persecution

posted by Stephanie Drury

Jesus said being persecuted goes with the territory of following him, and some of those followers are really on the lookout.

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#184 Saying “Now, I know what you’re thinking.”

posted by Stephanie Drury

This is a fun little catchphrase that every pastor keeps chambered. He uses it after saying something he imagines was startling.

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#179 Abusing “awesome”

posted by Stephanie Drury

“Awesome” is Christian culture’s favorite adjective for God. It’s their default descriptor when speaking of him.

#175 The word “faith-walk”

posted by Stephanie Drury

Christian culture is the only demographic to employ the term “faith-walk.”

#165 Camping out on a verse

posted by Stephanie Drury

“Camp out” is code for “this is going to take awhile.”

#156 Hedge of protection

posted by Stephanie Drury

When praying for somone’s safety, Christians use the phrase “hedge of protection.” They just can’t help themselves.

#154 The word “backsliding”

posted by Stephanie Drury

Backsliding is a word used by Christians when people fall away from the faith. The adjective form is “backslidden,” the present participle is “backsliding,” and if you want to sound southern the past participle is “backslid.”

#149 Calling the lobby the narthex

posted by Stephanie Drury

Even the warehouse-iest of church buildings call their warehouse-y lobbies the narthex as it perhaps lends a bit of elegance, like saying fo-yay instead of foy-yer (the latter pronunciation being common in the Bible belt).

#147 Saying “Great insight”

posted by Stephanie Drury

“Great insight” is the response of choice when a person in Christian culture says something spiritually poignant.

#145 Saying that they “married out of their league”

posted by Stephanie Drury

Men in Christian culture like to say they have “married up” or “married out of their league.” They make a point to speak of their wife in glowing terms as often as possible.

#140 Saying “hanging” instead of “hanging out”

posted by Stephanie Drury

Christian culture tends to omit the word “out” from the term “hanging out.” They just “hang.”

#137 Sneaking onstage during prayer

posted by Stephanie Drury

When the pastor finishes the sermon and says “Let’s close in prayer,” this is usually the band’s cue to sneak silently back onstage.

#117 Saying “not in that order”

posted by Stephanie Drury

When writing their Facebook or blog profiles, evangelicals are fond of stating their interests are “not in that order.”

#110 Saying “God is moving”

posted by Stephanie Drury

This is a popular saying with hazy meaning. Taken literally you might think God has abandoned his ancestral seat and is swanning about, but you infer from the context that can’t be what they mean.

#104 Saying “just” a lot while praying out loud

posted by Stephanie Drury

When called upon to pray aloud in a group, an evangelical automatically says “just” a few dozen times during the course of the prayer. This doesn’t happen when other flavors of Christians such as Catholics or Episcopalians pray, but an […]

Introductory post

posted by Stephanie Drury

Hi! I started this blog (stuffchristianculturelikes.com) in August 2008. I know this isn’t a new concept and I’m not a pioneer in angst about evangelicalism – lots of people have done this before and have done it better than me. […]

News bulletin

posted by Stephanie Drury

Dear darling reader, Beliefnet asked if they could host this blog and I said sure. So next week it will move over there, but this link will still route to it. So, that’s kind of exciting. Yips! Blessings,stephy

#93 Saying you’re married to your best friend

posted by Stephanie Drury

Christians aren’t the only people who say this, but they make up 93% of the people who do. The remaining 7% are some rogue non-Christians who are unabashed corndogs. In a Christian’s blog profile it’s categorically impossible for the spouse-as-best-friend […]

#92 Hoping that the rapture doesn’t happen until after your wedding night

posted by Stephanie Drury

The chances that vestal sexytimes will be mentioned during the wedding ceremony are pretty high among Baptists and non-denominational evangelicals.

#89 Saying “It’s a God thing” when something good happens

posted by Stephanie Drury

“It’s a God thing” is a phrase frequently spoken in Christian culture. It is always said in response to something good that has happened.

#77 Getting plugged in

posted by Stephanie Drury

“Get plugged in” is a phrase used by assorted pastoral staff to encourage church involvement. The youth pastor especially desires for you to get plugged in. He is the most frequent user of this phrase. Close behind him in rate […]

#74 Challenging

posted by Stephanie Drury

People in Christian culture like to say “I challenge you to,” followed by a verb. The verb is often “invite.” The direct object is often “someone.”

#72 Spiritual email signoffs

posted by Stephanie Drury

When a Christian emails another Christian, they are likely to use a signoff that acknowledges the Lord. If a secular signoff is “Sincerely” or “Best,” a spiritual signoff is “In Christ” or “Blessings.” It can also present itself in the […]

#71 Worship leaders asking folks to “really think about the words to this next song”

posted by Stephanie Drury

Worship leaders want to break it down for a minute. After some rousing worship anthems, it’s time to get serious. This is when they’ll play the first chords of something evocative (like “As The Deer” or “Softly and Tenderly”) and […]

#70 Wireless headset mics

posted by Stephanie Drury

They were once only worn by McDonald’s drive-thru workers, infomercial hosts and Janet Jackson, but now microphone headsets are becoming a standard fixture during sermons at non-denominational churches.

#69 Saying “Let’s close in prayer”

posted by Stephanie Drury

At the end of any sort of talk given where Christians are known to be present, the speaker will say “Let’s close in prayer.” They cannot help themselves.

#62 Christ-ifying Product Logos

posted by Stephanie Drury

This means of proseletyzing is very popular within some segments of Christian culture. It is available in many forms: t-shirts, bumper stickers, buttons, mousepads, pencil holders, coffee mugs, keychains and innumerable other solid objects, including mints.

#61 Saying They’re Under Attack

posted by Stephanie Drury

Christian culture talks a great deal about being “under attack.” God is under attack, truth is under attack, the gospel is under attack, one-man-one-woman marriage is under attack, the right to life is under attack, the right to worship is under attack. This is interesting because it’s laid out pretty clearly in the Bible that truth will constantly be under attack until the day of Christ’s return. It says there will be no letting up.

#59 Saying that their spouse is hot

posted by Stephanie Drury

Many married Christian men frequently state that their wife is hot. On Facebook, in Christmas letters and in their blog profiles, Christian guys make a point of saying this. A lot.

#53 Making An Impact

posted by Stephanie Drury

Christian culture is obsessed with making an impact. Churches hire marketing teams and ministries hire strategists for this purpose. “We need to make an impact!” “We’re making an impact for God!” But any impact that is made for good is God’s doing entirely, and the more we contrive to impact the more we get in the way.

#46 LMBO

posted by Stephanie Drury

The logical conclusion here is that butt is more beneficial than ass. LMBO is very popular with the homeschooling sector.

#25 Asking Someone “How’s Your Walk With God?”

posted by Stephanie Drury

This question is as acutely personal as asking “How’s sex with your wife?” and yet many Christians feel entitled to casually ask it of each other.

#24 Catchphrases

posted by Stephanie Drury

Christian culture enjoys a catchy quip on a t-shirt or bumper sticker. These quips are intended to provoke and possibly shame their reader.

#17 Saying “Bless This Food To The Nourishment Of Our Bodies”

posted by Stephanie Drury

When praying out loud before eating in a group, members of Christian culture can’t help but to say this. They just can’t help it.

Previous Posts

auf Wiedersehen
My contract with Beliefnet is up and I'll be back on my own ad-free domain again. Beliefnet has been really lovely to me and I appreciate their letting me write whatever I want without trying to censor anything. I will be back on my blogger ...

posted 7:56:21pm Feb. 21, 2011 | read full post »

#210 Mandatory chapel at Bible college
Most Christian colleges require students to attend chapel services. Chapel is not an option, it's part of the curriculum. If you don't fulfill your chapel quota, you don't graduate. Though Christianity purports to operate under the auspices of ...

posted 7:06:31pm Feb. 11, 2011 | read full post »

#209 Perceiving persecution
Christian culture is vigilant about persecution. Jesus said being persecuted goes with the territory of following him, and some of those followers are really on the lookout. Christian culture sees persecution in all sorts of things and they ...

posted 6:16:31pm Feb. 03, 2011 | read full post »

#208 Missionary dating
When someone in Christian culture meets a delicious non-Christian they will usually assume a missionary position with them. Missionary dating is when you date a non-Christian for the express purpose of proselytizing so as to instigate their ...

posted 6:16:57pm Jan. 27, 2011 | read full post »

#207 Marrying young
Christian culture gets married young. The reason isn't entirely clear, but the general consensus is that it drastically lowers the risk of fornication. You just can't fornicate if you're married, and that takes care of that. Fornication is ...

posted 6:33:07pm Jan. 19, 2011 | read full post »

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