Steven Waldman

Steven Waldman


Michael Jackson’s Sad Childhood & Joyful Sabbaths

posted by swaldman

michael jackson3.jpgPerhaps by the time Michael Jackson was an adult, he was drawn toward the outrageous, unusual or abnormal, but as a child he seemed to want nothing more than to be like other kids.
“More than anything, I wished to be a normal little boy,” he wrote in an extraordinary essay on Beliefnet in 2000. “I wanted to build tree houses and go to roller-skating parties. But very early on, this became impossible. I had to accept that my childhood would be different than most others. But that’s what always made me wonder what an ordinary childhood would be like.”
It’s easy to see how his yearning for a lost childhood connects to his fixation with Peter Pan and is abnormal relationships with children.
But Jackson said his religion provided some of his few moments of normality. Raised as a Jehovah’s Witness, Jackson as a child would go door to door peddling religious literature. As an adult, he would put on a fat suit and disguise to hand out material at the shopping mall, and gain peace from his anonymity, and his own celebration of Sabbath:

“Sundays were my day for “Pioneering,” the term used for the missionary work that Jehovah’s Witnesses do. We would spend the day in the suburbs of Southern California, going door to door or making the rounds of a shopping mall, distributing our Watchtower magazine. I continued my pioneering work for years and years after my career had been launched. Up to 1991, the time of my Dangerous tour, I would don my disguise of fat suit, wig, beard, and glasses and head off to live in the land of everyday America, visiting shopping plazas and tract homes in the suburbs.”

He attended Church each Sunday and mourned the loss of his ability to do that:

“When circumstances made it increasingly complex for me to attend, I was comforted by the belief that God exists in my heart, and in music and in beauty, not only in a building. But I still miss the sense of community that I felt there–I miss the friends and the people who treated me like I was simply one of them. Simply human. Sharing a day with God.”

Clearly Jackson wasn’t really normal. On some level he must surely have thirst for the abnormal. After all, his fame flowed not just from his talent but his strangeness. Yet part of the tragedy was his longing for his lost childhood.
It’s worth reading Jackson’s entire essay.



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Susan

posted July 7, 2009 at 4:20 pm


Michael Jackson was disfellowshipped/disassociated/excommunicated and the wordage all mean the same thing.
It means that the JW consider MJ CONDEMENED eternally dammed which was easy for them to do when he was getting all the bad press,NOW they don’t want the general public to know about it.
JW cult lie and lie and lie….they call it ‘theocratic warfare’ don’t get mixed up with them.



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Robert

posted July 7, 2009 at 6:11 pm


Elephant in the room (aside from MJ’s “alleged” pedophilia, of course): The entire African-American entertainment community,Jehovah’s Witnesses and even the political establishment is rallying around Michael Jackson.
And yet, MJ, perhaps more than any other celebrity/public figure you can name, spent his life essentially trying to deny his race – whitening his skin, straightening his hair, having surgery to create a “Caucasian” nose, having more surgery to remove other African-American facial features, reproducing with a white woman so that his children would be mixed race.
Why is nobody talking about this messed up Jehovah’s Witness?



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Terrance Paulin

posted July 7, 2009 at 11:38 pm


It is unfortunate that in this society we feel that superstars have no privacy. Michael Jackson became a victim of his fame. I pray that he now can find the peace that he so seeked.
Terrance Paulin



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Mike

posted July 8, 2009 at 4:58 am


All JW’s raised in this cult grow up freaks! They are isolated from the world, they are so afraid of being disfellowshipped. My husband was disfellowshipped from this cult and I think it was the best thing that could ever happen to him.



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Act

posted July 8, 2009 at 7:11 am


Get a Life people! I am not a JW but the popel who attacked them i think they are the ones that need to apply the freedom of speech thing. they believe in freedom if everyone is catholic…other than that there is no freedom. Hypocrites!



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sean

posted July 8, 2009 at 10:42 am


I watched the memorial service yesterday and saw no references to Jehovah at all. He obviously left his upbringing in the past when he made “Thriller”. Now the trill is gone. He chose to glorify himself rather than his Creator, who I don’t believe he ever had the time to really know. Many children leave their early guidance when they are dazzled by fame and fortune. I hope we all will learn a lesson from this rather than just mock… God is not one to be mocked; we reap what we sow. Susan and Robert and others who just use this opportunity to mislead and spread hatred and misinformation are like the many who used Michael. It left him confused and with no hope. Christ was wise to reject the superficial things of this world and encouraged us to imitate him. That is where real peace is found; not in serving this world and not in death.



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Ace

posted July 9, 2009 at 11:27 am


The question arises was Michael Jackson abused? The answer is absolutely yes, he manifested every symptom in his life. The belief system of Jehovah’s Witnesses routinely covers up abuse and of this Michael was a victim.
The weirdness of his life and actions are easily explained by understanding the “us against them” belief system of Jehovah’s Witnesses.
He was never at peace and always felt like a failure to his mom for not emulating and living her beliefs. The result was a sad person trying to find peace but deep down feeling he was never good enough where it really counted.
Isn’t it striking that those that have been involved and “fallen” from the Jehovah’s Witnesses have strikingly similar experiences to those who were involved with and “fell” from Scientology?



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tom sheepandgoats

posted July 10, 2009 at 3:48 am


But I still miss the sense of community that I felt there–I miss the friends and the people who treated me like I was simply one of them. Simply human..
Whatever comments one might make about JWs, it’s clear that their meetings were the one place he could go and not be idolized, kissed up to, or surrounded by persons with ulterior motives. A respite, if you will, from a celebrity-worshipping world that would ultimately tear him apart.



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Gert

posted July 13, 2009 at 8:57 am


The Jehovah’s Witnesses religion teaches that there are two worlds: One that is governed by the Watchtower Society JW and the one run by Satan(non-JW).
Google yahoo search: Jehovah Witness
Former JWs are the best source of information about the cult. They know because they have lived it. Those who are still inside can’t speak freely. Who has more credibility?
Think about it



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Your Name

posted July 13, 2009 at 11:29 am


Gert:
I’ve thought about it.
On the other hand, the JW religion (like most others) is a organization that invites its members to stay forever. Therefore, it might be likened to a corporation offering lifetime employment.
Take a former Microsoft employee, for example. A better source of information than a current Microsoft employee? There’s many reasons one can leave, of course, but one thing you know for sure: there’s no chance the current employee has an axe to grind and there’s no chance the current employee was fired.



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tom sheepandgoats

posted July 13, 2009 at 11:54 am


Gert:
I’ve thought about it.
On the other hand, the JW religion (like most others) is a organization that invites its members to stay forever. Therefore, it might be likened to a corporation offering lifetime employment.
Take a former Microsoft employee, for example. A better source of information than a current Microsoft employee? There’s many reasons one can leave, of course, but one thing you know for sure: there’s no chance the current employee has an axe to grind and there’s no chance the current employee was fired.
(apolgies to the blogmaster for ‘cleanup’ work)



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Gerard Nadal

posted July 13, 2009 at 2:21 pm


Jackson lived and died an unrepentant pedophile, no different than the Jewish and Christian pedophiles in the clergy and laity, or the pedophile teachers who assault 9% of the children who attend public schools (US Dept. of Education stat).
As such, he should be reviled. If his adoring fans find a messed up childhood as exculpatory, they should be prepared to extend that standard of exoneration to those who have created the 39 million victims of sex abuse in America.
I pity him as a tragic figure, as I do those in my Church who abused children. But pity for clergy is not the stuff of momentum for canonization. The same may be said for Jackson. Enough with the adulation already. We should pray for him and his victims, learn something sobering from it all, and move on.



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tom sheepandgoats

posted July 13, 2009 at 3:28 pm


Gerard:
That said, in all fairness, the courts found him not guilty.



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Gerard Nadal

posted July 14, 2009 at 10:54 am


Tom,
Yes, he was found not guilty the same way OJ was acquitted in the double-murder of Nicole and Ron. I heard the testimony in that case. Were that a Catholic Priest instead of Jackson with that testimony, the outcome would have been far different. I guess the lesson is that if one is to be a pedophile, one had better be damned good at song and dance.
But yes, technically he was found not guilty; which is not the same as being found innocent. It merely means that guilt was not established beyond a reasonable doubt. That’s the standard in criminal court. Under the looser standard of civil court, a preponderance of the evidence, I believe there was a settlement. Same as OJ.
God Bless.



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tom sheepandgoats

posted July 14, 2009 at 2:50 pm


Perhaps you’re exactly right. Dunno. But I’m not in a hurry to condemn. Here’s a journalist who lists several reasons, all plausible to me, why he thinks MJ was rightly aquitted.
He appears to know facts neither you nor I have.
http://www.slate.com/id/2120889/



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Danny Haszard

posted July 17, 2009 at 4:23 am


I was born 3rd generation Jehovah’s Witness 1957,and am the same age (51) as Michael Jackson,I remember the Jackson 5 debut in 1968 they were BIG.
MJ was baptized a Jehovah’s Witness and then disfellowshipped/disassociated/excommunicated to be shunned.
A lot of my dysfunctional life is directly related to my apocalyptic Watchtower sect upbringing indoctrination and I wonder about same with Michael Jackson?
There are a million hurting EXJW kids out there. Best regards,Danny Haszard
Michael Jackson Jehovah’s Witnesses chronicles
http://dannyhaszard.com/death_of_michael_jackson.htm



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