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When studying the Bible, there are two ways to approach the Scriptures.  Of course, one method is almost always preferred over the other metod by most teachers.  Yet, there is perhaps no best way to teach God’s Word.   Each one has its strengths and its weaknesses.

Exegesis–First, you can use what is a verse-by-verse exegesis.  In this method, there is a exposition and explanation of a specific verse.  It is especially noted as an in depth explanation or critical interpretation of a text.  In this method, a person will probably begin at chapter 1, verse 1 of a book of the Bible and teach each verse until the end of the book.  The purist will begin at Matthew and teach the entire New Testament or begin at Genesis and teach the entire Bible.

I have a love/hate approach to this method of teaching.  I love digging into God’s word and discovering the nuances of what the Holy Spirit wants to teach us in a particular verse.

However, on the other hand, teaching the exergesis method is much like wading through water for me.  I love the first five minutes when I’m wading; but soon I want to either swim to quickly get to the other side.  Or I want get out of the water all together.  I find when I teach the Bible in this method, I want to teach every new and old revelation that I note.  I have taught one verse for five or six lessons.

Some verses especially in the epistles are so incredibly rich in value that I have a terrible time moving to the next verse.  Therefore, it can take years to teach one of Paul’s letters.  For other teachers, it’s a gold mine from which they can glean lessons that empower them with glee.  For me, I get bored.  After about five verses (and two months of lessons), I want to begin to skip and jump over the truths in order to finish the letter.

Teachers who are able to effectively teach by this method, don’t camp on one verse as I do.  They are able to move gracefully through the books of the Bible effectively, teaching the prominant truths without making each verb and noun the subject of 17 lessons.

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