Advertisement

Science and the Sacred

Science and the Sacred

January 1970 Archives

In Defense of Dover

Every Friday, “Science and the Sacred” features an essay from a guest voice in the science and religion dialogue. This week’s guest entry was written by David Opderbeck. Opderbeck is a professor of law at Seton Hall University School of […]

Advertisement

A Library

“The Bible is not a book but a library, with various types of writing in it. There is much history, but there are also symbolic stories that convey truths so deep that only a story form could convey them. (That […]

Advertisement

Paley and Kingsley

In his work Natural Theology, philosopher William Paley proposed his famous “watchmaker” argument for the existence to God. According to Paley, just as the intricate design of a watch implies a designer, so too the intricate design of the universe […]

Advertisement

Finding Harmony

Many evangelicals do not seriously deal with evolution until their post-secondary education.  For some, coming face to face with the evidence for evolution can be a threatening and faith-shaking experience. For others, finding harmony between faith and evolution is natural […]

Chopping Logic

posted by kgiberson

Every Monday, “Science and the Sacred” features an essay from one of The BioLogos Foundation’s co-presidents: Karl Giberson and Darrel Falk. Today’s entry was written by Karl Giberson. Two curiously related things happened to me last month. The first was […]

Oxygen and Co-Creation

Every Friday, “Science and the Sacred” features an essay from a guest voice in the science and religion dialogue. This week’s guest entry was written by Mike Tice. Tice is a geobiologist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Geology […]

An Artist or An Engineer?

The problem of imperfect design in nature raises serious concerns for the idea of God as the divine engineer, the metaphor put forward by those associated with the Intelligent Design movement. After all, if God designed each detail in the […]

Darwin, Laplace, and “God of the Gaps” Reasoning

To some, Darwin’s theory of evolution has atheistic implications and seems like an attack against the divine power of God to create the universe. Certainly, Darwin’s theory does offer a natural explanation for how highly complex systems in biology seem […]

Evolution in an Erlenmeyer Flask

Twenty-one years and 40,000 generations later, an experiment looking at the evolution of a population of single-celled E. coli bacteria has finally reached its conclusion. The results “beautifully emphasize the succession of mutational events that allowed these organisms to climb […]

Nature’s God-Talk

posted by Darrel Falk

The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands. Day after day they pour forth speech; night after night they display knowledge. There is no speech or language where their voice is not heard. […]

Finding Common Ground

Every Friday, “Science and the Sacred” features an essay from a guest voice in the science and religion dialogue. This week’s guest entry was written by Shelley Emling. Emling is a freelance writer for the International Herald Tribune and a […]

Astronomy and Faith

“Our explorations have produced a vast archive of remarkable astronomical images… The riches are too many for choices, the revelations beautiful and dreadful. Who can look at these images and not be transformed? The heavens declare God’s glory.” -Chet Raymo, […]

Astronomy and the Vatican

When many people hear the words “astronomy” and “the Vatican”, they are reminded of the infamous trial of Galileo, who was forced to recant his championing of the Copernican model and the belief that the earth revolved around the sun. […]

Removing the Center

Many evangelical books on science and creation insist that there are major flaws in the idea that life appeared gradually over time. Rather than highlighting minor issues with the theory, they insist that evolution is a corrupt and inherently wrong […]

A House of Sand and Fog

posted by kgiberson

Every Monday, “Science and the Sacred” features an essay from one of The BioLogos Foundation’s co-presidents: Karl Giberson and Darrel Falk. Today’s entry was written by Karl Giberson. I recently finished a tour of the Answers in Genesis Creation Museum […]

Optical Illusions and the Evolution of Sight

In this video, Beau Lotto, founder of art studio and science lab Lottolabs, offers a fun look at optical illusions and how they reflect the evolution of our ability to see. Our vision, argues Lotto, does not show the world […]

An Active Creator and a Cooperating Creation

“The picture I want of God’s relationship with the world is one of continuing interaction, not occasional intervention; poking with the divine finger when things go wrong. I believe that God interacts with the world, but doesn’t overrule the freedom […]

Helping the Teachers

On Monday, Darrel Falk addressed the need to teach children both respect for the Bible and an understanding of science.  He called for concerned Christians to begin developing a curriculum that embraces the harmony of Christian faith and science. In […]

God’s Sovereignty and Nature’s Freedom

Today’s entry was written by Kathryn Applegate. Applegate is completing her PhD in Cell Biology at The Scripps Research Institute. Genetic switches that act during development to produce a newborn baby seem, like Michael Behe’s mouse trap, irreducibly complex. As […]

Saving the Children

posted by Darrel Falk

Every Monday, “Science and the Sacred” features an essay from one of The BioLogos Foundation’s co-presidents: Karl Giberson and Darrel Falk. Today’s entry was written by Darrel Falk. Recently BioLogos received the following comment from a visitor to its website: […]

Intelligent Design vs. Alien Intervention

Every Friday, “Science and the Sacred” features an essayfrom a guest voice in the science and religion dialogue. This week’sguest entry was written by Gordon J. Glover. Glover holds degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Ocean Engineering and is the author […]

The Deep Aesthetic of Nature

We have all experienced, in one form or another, the beauty and awe of the natural world around us. Whether it be standing amongst a field of wildflowers, gazing down from atop a mountain, or pausing to listen to the […]

Previous Posts

We're Moving
Science & the Sacred is moving to our new home on The BioLogos Foundation's Web site. Be sure to visit and bookmark our new location to stay up to date with the latest blogs from Karl Giberson, Darrel Falk, Pete Enns, and our various guests ...

posted 8:00:00am Dec. 11, 2009 | read full post »

Shiny Scales, Silvery Skins, and Evolution
  Source: Physorg.comIridescence -- a key component of certain makeup, paints, coatings of mirrors and lenses -- is also an important feature in the natural world. Both fish and spiders make use of periodic photonic systems, which scatter ...

posted 8:00:00am Dec. 09, 2009 | read full post »

A Stellar Advent Calendar
Looking for a unique way to mark the days of the Advent season? The Web site Boston.com offers an Advent calendar composed of images from the Hubble Telescope, both old and new. Each day, from now until the celebration of the Nativity of Christ, ...

posted 8:00:00am Dec. 09, 2009 | read full post »

Belief, Guidance, and Evolution
Recently BioLogos' Karl Giberson was interviewed by Marcio Campos for the Brazilian newspaper Gazeta do Povo's Tubo De Ensaio (i.e. "Test tube") section. What follows is a translated transcript of that interview, which we will be posting in ...

posted 8:00:00am Dec. 08, 2009 | read full post »

Let's Come at this From a Different Angle
Every Friday, "Science and the Sacred" features an essay from a guest voice in the science and religion dialogue. This week's guest entry was written by Peter Enns. Enns is an evangelical Christian scholar and author of several books and ...

posted 8:00:00am Dec. 04, 2009 | read full post »

Advertisement


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.