Rod Dreher

Rod Dreher


Christopher Hitchens has cancer

posted by Rod Dreher

Chuck Bloom passes on the sad news:

Christopher Hitchens is being treated for cancer, forcing the D.C. writer to cut short his latest book tour. In a statement released through his publisher Twelve, the British-born provocateur, 61, said that he has “been advised by my physician that I must undergo a course of chemotherapy on my esophagus. This advice seems persuasive to me.”

I hope you will join me in praying for his healing, body and soul. Somehow, I doubt the author of “God Is Not Great” would object; cancer has a way of humbling one in this regard. Anyway, he suffers, and has more to suffer, and needs us to stand with him in whatever way we can.



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Andrea

posted July 1, 2010 at 8:41 am


I’m sorry for the man and hope he gets better. I also hope that he will have cause to rethink some of his views about God, but either way I wouldn’t wish cancer on him or anyone else.



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Paul

posted July 1, 2010 at 8:54 am


I knew it wouldn’t take me long to find a Christian smugly commenting on Hitchens’s diagnosis (“I doubt the author of “God Is Not Great” would object; cancer has a way of humbling people…”).
True to form, you Christians prove you’re every bit as petty as the rest of us. (The only problem with that is, you’re so insistent you are otherwise).
Couldn’t you just make a comment consisting of good wishes towards the man and leave it at that? No way! Too juicy a chance for you to swoop vulture-like upon.
As for humbling the man – I wouldn’t bet on it my friend.
So pray for yourself my friend. Medical science will, or will not, save Hitchens. I very much hope it does.



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Rod Dreher

posted July 1, 2010 at 9:01 am


Re: Paul, aren’t militant atheists such special people?



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MargaretE

posted July 1, 2010 at 9:09 am


Paul, I don’t find Rod’s post remotely petty or vulture-like. Yours, on the other hand…



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Niall Gooch

posted July 1, 2010 at 9:14 am


Let’s be honest here, Paul.
You were looking for a Christian to be uncharitable towards the Hitch, and when you couldn’t find one, you read a ridiculous false inference into Rod’s post.
All that Rod is doing here is anticipating Mr Hitchens’ likely objection to being prayed for, and wondering whether perhaps under the circumstances the Hitch might soften on such an issue.
I think your weird pouncing on this issue says a lot about your desire to stoke the culture wars, and nothing about Rod’s charitableness.



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Donne Hamilton

posted July 1, 2010 at 9:16 am


I find the comments interesting. Whether we believe in God and Jesus or not – bad things happen. And Christians are no less apt to ask God WHY ME when bad things happen. I’ve had bad experiences with Christians too. Doesn’t change what God has promised. And THAT is the difference. As Christians we have hope. You don’t. I am sorry for you and your intolerance of others who choose to state their thought.
PS Paul – did you know that PAUL was the most vicious anti-Christ legalistic Jewish church leader in Rome? Yet he came to know Jesus.



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Christopher

posted July 1, 2010 at 9:16 am


I lost my father to esophageal cancer. It is a form of cancer that is rising precipitously over the past decades. The cause is unknown but acid from the stomach leading to cell changes and ultimately cancer is suspected. Dad lived on antacids for as long as I knew him. The rise in this cancer might be attributed to our soda consumption across the same decades. If caught early it is very treatable. Folks you should be getting a scope sent down your esophagus every few years once you pass 40 just like you should get the same thing done to your colon every few years.



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Alicia

posted July 1, 2010 at 10:27 am


I had the special privilege of hearing Hitchens read from and discuss his memoir, “Hitch-22″ at Politics and Prose last month, and I am in the process of reading the book. Recently, I read “God is Not Great.”
Hitchens has always struck me as the Left’s answer to William F. Buckley. He can certainly come off like “an effete snob” but he is a brilliant man, and are world is richer because he is in it. What I love best about him is that he tells the truth as he sees it no matter who it inconveniences.
I am praying for him and his family (and I’m still on the fence about what or who I am praying to) and hope he recovers his strength and vitality shortly.



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Alicia

posted July 1, 2010 at 10:28 am


That should have been, “our world is richer because he is in it.”



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Dan O.

posted July 1, 2010 at 10:29 am


The mature atheist treats prayers-for as well-wishes, and leaves it at that. After all, if prayer is impotent, it does no harm.
I wish Hitchens well, and not only because he is the single most engaging personality on chat-shows.



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Barb

posted July 1, 2010 at 10:33 am


This is discussing. I know the first thing I would do when I find out someone has cancer is to suggest that they will be humbled and adopt my pet life philosophy. It might be wise if you took your own wishes to heart for yourself. You might add that you might develop the ability to not kick at those who are down.



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Rod Dreher

posted July 1, 2010 at 10:52 am


Ah, dear, dear Barb, another classy atheist militant, I presume.
Hitch hates religion. While I certainly hope he converts to Christianity — my hope for him long before his cancer diagnosis — my intention here was to ask other Christians to pray for a man who despises our religion. To pray for him not to spite him, but because he’s a suffering man who deserves our compassion and the best we have to give him.
I also hope that facing death will make him less hostile to people praying for him, and to faith. When my sister, who is a Christian, was diagnosed, people of faiths she does not believe in said they were praying for her to their god, or gods. She doesn’t believe their gods exist, but she took their sentiments as these kind strangers wishing the very best they possibly could for her — and for that, she was genuinely grateful. I hope he’ll come to understand that while he may not share our faith, we are not (not all of us, anyway) his enemies, but people who wish him well.



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Brett R.

posted July 1, 2010 at 10:54 am


I hope this doesn’t slow his writing and work down too much. His voice would be much missed. His autobio is on my upcoming reading list.



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Martin-C

posted July 1, 2010 at 11:04 am


I agree with Dan-O. When people say “God bless you” or something like that, I take it in the spirit in which it was intended. Don’t go looking for offense where it doesn’t exist when there is plenty of real hostility towards atheists to go around on lots of religious blogs. The civility on this blog is why I come here.



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hlvanburen

posted July 1, 2010 at 12:01 pm


I have to agree with Mr. Dreher here. I didn’t take his remarks as a slap at Mr. Hitchens’ beliefs. As a Christian Mr. Dreher is doing what he sincerely believes to be beneficial to the situation…he is offering prayer to a God who he believes can intervene positively in the situation. Given how he has commented regarding Hitchens’ work in the past I take it as Mr. Dreher putting into practice the “hate the sin, love the sinner” motto we so often hear coming from Christians (but so rarely see acted out in a sincere manner).
As he so aptly points out about his sister’s situation, sincere concerns offered with a caring heart are always welcome, even if they don’t happen to be made to the same deity. While Hitchens may roll his eyes at the notion of this changing his view of deity, I am pretty confident he would be thankful for the sincere concern and expression of best wishes…whatever form they may take. I know that if I were in his position I would be thankful.
So how about we give Mr. Dreher a break on this one, eh? There are times when the Working Boy deserves to be the Whipping Boy, but in my humble opinion this isn’t one of those times.
However, your mileage may vary.



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elizabeth

posted July 1, 2010 at 12:09 pm


Rod is absolutely earnest and sincere in his request for prayers for Hitchens. Rod himself has certainly been humbled by life experiences, among them his dear sister’s illness, and it is not snarky or ironic in the least for him to acknowledge that facing something of this magnitude can be humbling.
As a Buddhist non-theist, I hold Rod’s family in metta (lovingkindness) practice and will do the same with Hitchens and family. And for that matter, all beings.
My fellow non-theists, please get over your own bad selves.
CAPTCHA: of marxism
Hmmm…



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La Dolce Vita

posted July 1, 2010 at 12:09 pm


It seems to me that militant atheists like Paul and Barb are not simply in denial that God exists, they are in denial of the existential circumstances that force thinking (and feeling) human beings to fully confront the question of faith once and for all.
It is one thing to stand in Pascal’s footprints and honestly conclude that the wager is unconvincing; or to look through Kiekegaard’s eyes and confess that one simply cannot truthfully make the leap. But such a person would also gain an acute appreciation for the ominous corner into which our common humanity has been painted. Simple compassion should soften one’s stance against the believer, just as compassion should soften the stance of the believer against the suffering unbeliever.
Susan Sontag was an intellectual giant, a brilliant woman of seemingly exceptional emotional and even physical courage. And yet she melted like snow in the glance of her inescapable mortality. It saddened me to read that she would encourage friends to lie about her prospects for survival, yet refuse to entertain the possibility of a faith-based alternative to her impending extinction. I did not feel snide or self-righteous. I felt somewhat heartbroken.
Yes, there are plenty of religious people who are just as petty as certain militant atheists. But I’ll warrant they haven’t “met the elephant” either.



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Gus

posted July 1, 2010 at 12:37 pm


Sad news, indeed. I find Hitchens to be a bit of a blowhard, but his unwillingness to pull punches is refreshing. I’m guessing this is a result of his heavy drinking, a common contributor to esophageal cancer.



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John E. - Agn Stoic

posted July 1, 2010 at 12:41 pm


Add my voice to the other non-theists here who think that the handful of militantly non-theistic folks who are getting bent out of shape by Rod’s compassionate thoughts towards CH and his diagnosis might ought to just chill and not read any bad intent on Rod’s part towards Hitchens.



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Annette

posted July 1, 2010 at 1:18 pm


Reading this post makes me want to wash my hands. Using someone else’s suffering to make yourself seem magnanimous is truly vile. Anybody with 2 cents worth of intelligence can see what you’re saying here: “Hah hah, you have cancer. Thinking twice about that God thing, right?” Christian hypocrites make me sick.



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karlub

posted July 1, 2010 at 2:01 pm


@ Annette:
Doesn’t seem to me you need Rod’s post to make you feel perpetually sick.
Thanks to the non-theists for seeing Christian prayer in the light in which it is intended, and for not presuming to see into a another man’s (or woman’s) heart.
Perhaps this will help our more dyspeptic non-believer peers find their way to a more peaceful and charitable mindset. I mean, c’mon, people. Is hoping for peace, charity, and humility really such an affront?



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Martin-C

posted July 1, 2010 at 2:11 pm


Annette, go away
I certainly don’t think that prayer will do anything to help anyone beyond the placebo effect nor is there a God you distributes healing according to popularity but you’re way off if you think Rod’s post was anything less that a geniune outreach of sympathy. If you read this blog for any lenght of time you will see he is one of the most emotionally honest people on the net.



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Martin-C

posted July 1, 2010 at 2:12 pm


Sorry, spelling mistake
it should read:
——————————————–
Annette, go away
I certainly don’t think that prayer will do anything to help anyone beyond the placebo effect nor is there a God who distributes healing according to popularity but you’re way off if you think Rod’s post was anything less that a geniune outreach of sympathy. If you read this blog for any lenght of time you will see he is one of the most emotionally honest people on the net.



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James

posted July 1, 2010 at 2:18 pm


Annette, asking people to pray for a person is not about making oneself seem magnanimous, it’s about living out one’s faith and compassion as God calls us to. His post was about himself, it was about a man dealing with a disease, and a call on those who do so to pray for him. Plain and simple.
If you still feel the need to wash your hands, do so. You probably need to after using the combox to lob bombs at a man just because your don’t share his faith and can’t simply let a request for intercession be what it is.



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Clare Krishan

posted July 1, 2010 at 2:32 pm


Rather than kvetch(*) the humanist in me takes Hitch at his word “This advice seems persuasive to me” and concurs with Rod’s “… praying for his healing, body and soul” in rational pursuit of avoidance of sorrows (since all the best things come in threes, here also, all etymologically-rooted in our shared proto-indo-european tongue-tied selves – *swe (self, soul), *swad (sweet, good, desirable, as in healing) *swerg (German sorge, English sore, sorrow)
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vocabulario_indoeuropeo_%28no_sustantivos%29
(*) Yiddish, c.f. quarrel, PIE base *wek- “to speak, say”



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Ben

posted July 1, 2010 at 3:45 pm


I’ll take a stab that
“Ihope you will join me in praying for his healing, body and soul. Somehow, I doubt the author of “God Is Not Great” would object”
is not what the “militant atheists” are ranting about. I don’t have a heart attack any time someone says bless you, or I’ll pray for you, or anything like that.
Chances are, they are refering to:
“cancer has a way of humbling one in this regard.”
I would imagine Rod meant this to refer to Hitchen’s being okay with people praying for him. Plenty of atheists hear this as a form of “once you’re confronted with your end, you’ll turn and run to God”. Like no atheists in foxholes. I know Rod didn’t mean for it to sound like that, but I’ll admit that’s the way I read it the first time too.



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Roland de Chanson

posted July 1, 2010 at 4:18 pm


I’m in a quandary. I lost my faith reading Hitchens’ book. So I can’t pray for him since there’s nobody to pray to anymore. So what do I do? I don’t yet have enough experience with materialism to know what to say to console him. I hope that … no wait, hope is futile when the cosmos is just a stochastic process.
Maybe … may his entropy remain relatively stable for many more years.
Nah — the optative mood seems like a gutless theistic cop-out too. Geez, the guy really messed with my mind. Or synapses. Or whatever. Damn.
Get well, Hitch.



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John E. - Agn Stoic

posted July 1, 2010 at 4:58 pm


I hope you will join me in praying for his healing, body and soul. Somehow, I doubt the author of “God Is Not Great” would object; cancer has a way of humbling one in this regard.
I took it to mean that when things get really bad, one becomes less concerned with ideological purity and more receptive to compassionate well-wishes from all.
Prayer – can’t hurt, might help.



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Peggy

posted July 1, 2010 at 5:20 pm


I took Rod’s remarks to mean a “humbling” in general, as in overall, the whole man.
Cancer does have a way of doing that. I don’t believe Rod is just salivating at the prospect of a Hitch conversion. I think he is just bringing up the possibility of a general softening of the man towards others who he has excoriated in the past.
Anyone who knows anything about Hitchens probably wouldn’t bet money on his changing his views any time soon.
I don’t count myself as a Hitchens fan but I certainly hope that he will come through this and be well.



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Max Schadenfreude

posted July 1, 2010 at 5:49 pm


“Couldn’t you just make a comment consisting of good wishes towards the man and leave it at that? No way! Too juicy a chance for you to swoop vulture-like upon.”
Apparently, what Paul and Barb (and possibly Annette; but who knows about that one?) fail to realize is that to the Christian humility is a good thing. Humilty is requried for an openess to God. The Christian wants the athiest to be WITH God, but this requires an openess, which, again, requires humilty.
These are good things in the Christian point of view. It is a way to wish and pray for the best thing possible for the sick person as the Christian understands it. The Christian wants the sick person to live in happiness for eternity.
Now it’s one thing for the athiest to say, “God and eternal happiness don’t exist, so I think you’re silly.” That would seem to be a fair statement even though I think it would be false.
But it’s something else entirely for an athiest to say, “You’re a wicked hypocrite for wanting a dying man to have this crazy “eternal happiness” you believe in! You make me sick.”
This latter is just unhinged.



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Mark

posted July 1, 2010 at 6:24 pm


“Somehow, I doubt the author of “God Is Not Great” would object”
At best, that is passive-aggressive. I agree with Paul and Barb that it is worse, but I won’t go there. (See how it works?) Edit out “Somehow … Anyway” (Anyway?!?) Now the post is much more charitable, perhaps even “Christian,” if you wish. (Wow, I could get used to this!)
As to the content, he would most certainly object. Even The Friendly Atheist says so: http://friendlyatheist.com/2010/06/30/hitchens-to-undergo-chemotherapy/



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Alicia

posted July 1, 2010 at 6:53 pm


While Rod doesn’t need me to defend him, I don’t think he was engaging in snark or using this post to make himself seem magnanimous. I get the sense that Hitchens is someone Rod Dreher genuinely admires, even if he doesn’t agree with his stand on religion.
It is a shame that this thread has degenerated into paranoia, when it (to me) was about keeping Hitchens in our thoughts and our prayers, whether to God or to the Flying Spaghetti Monster.
Christopher Hitchens is what we used to call in my family, “a character” which was not an insult but rather an appreciation of someone’s uniqueness, as in, “If Christopher Hitchens didn’t exist, it would be necessary to invent him.” I second everyone who has commented on how much we need Hitchens (and I liked his book, “God is Not Great”). Religion deserves a lot of the criticisms of the New Atheists.



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mouth

posted July 1, 2010 at 9:40 pm


“I hope you will join me in praying for his healing, body and soul. Somehow, I doubt the author of “God Is Not Great” would object; cancer has a way of humbling one in this regard.”
As a Christian, I would say that it matters not whether Hitchens would object or not whether we pray for him – his possible objection would have no impact whatever on our choice to to pray, which, as Jesus tells us should be done in private, with no calling of attention towards it.
If Hitchens would object, I feel there is a condescension in Mr. Dreher’s assumption that “arrogance” would be the reason for it – Mr. Dreher’s presumption that cancer would “humble” Hitchens to the point where he would not object to prayers on his behalf carries within it the unfortunate assertion that the opposite of humility – arrogance – is at the heart of Hitchens’ atheism and/or his hypothetical objection of prayers on his behalf.
The inescapable inference of Mr. Dreher’s words here are that arrogance alone is the reason for atheism, and for one like Hitchens it takes a horrible, frightening brush with mortality to finally humble him to the point where he is open to prayer – i.e., to get to the point where Mr. Dreher already is. Such musings are presumptuous, unfounded speculation. Based on Jesus’ words the truly Christian thing to do is pray – in private and wihout fanfare.



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Alicia

posted July 2, 2010 at 9:57 am


Lest anyone think Hitchens is arrogant in facing his demise (or in his refusal to pretend to beliefs he doesn’t share) I recommend reading the prologue of his memoir, “Hitch-22,” which is an elegant and moving meditation on mortality and death.
I was thinking this morning that Hitchens is that rare bird, an “entertaining” intellectual, not just entertaining in print, but also in person. That’s why he reminds me of Buckley. But in addition to being entertaining he is also a hero to those who those who believe in being open to unpopular truths.



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NS

posted July 2, 2010 at 12:53 pm


mouth, spot on!



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NS

posted July 2, 2010 at 1:09 pm


Rod,
“I also hope that facing death will make him less hostile to people praying for him, and to faith.”
These are not well-wishes. You are hoping a difficult situation will change him into someone who agrees with you about faith. (Curious, what if he became a Scientologist? Would you approve?)
“She doesn’t believe their gods exist, but she took their sentiments as these kind strangers wishing the very best they possibly could for her — and for that, she was genuinely grateful.”
Did any of these non-Christians tell your sister they hoped her cancer would bring Vishnu into her life? Or try to convince her that Muhammad is the true and last prophet of Allah? If not, then the comparison doesn’t stand.
[Note from Rod: I did not say, and would not say, that I hope cancer turns Hitch into a Christian. I said I hope it makes him less hostile to religious believers, and to faith. By which I mean I hope religious people show him compassion and help him through the struggle ahead, such that he realizes that faith is not his implacable and monolithic enemy. That’s a difference. — RD]



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GrantL

posted July 2, 2010 at 2:45 pm


Hmm….
Ok I think that Rod’s comments might have been taken out of context somewhat here, and at the same time, Rod probably did not consider exactly how they would be taken.
I often get lumped in as a “militant” or ‘fundamentalist” atheist so many I can offer some useful thoughts here. (completely meaningless terms by the way. “Militants” by definition engage in acts of violence. So “militant” Islamists blow themselves or others up. Or the nutbag Christian militia guys could be described as “militant.” A fundamentalist is so called (a self label by many Christians by the by) because they hew to a strict literalist interpretation of religious texts. Atheists don’t have religious texts, or ANY texts that are held in anywhere near the same regard as the Bible is to a fundamentalist Christian.)
I’ve had believers pray for me often. A good friend who is a Catholic Bishop often says he prays for me, another who is a United Church pastor prayed for me alot when I was rather ill a while back. I think he included me in his churches group prayers one Sunday morning. I take zero offense to this. While I do not share, even in the slightest, the belief system behind the prayer – aside from having similar effects on the body as meditation, studies have shown prayer is useless and does not effect external events – there is nothing to take offense at. My read of Hitchens is that he would probably regard it in much the same way.
If someone says “I’m praying for you to get well” or “I’ll pray your job interview goes well” or something like, what on earth am I to take offense at exactly? I consider it a totally wasted use of time, but the person in question generally wants me to do well or get better or whatever, and this is how they express it. So let them. No harm, no foul and at least you know people are thinking about you.
So to those jumping up and down going “oh Rod, you jerk” settle down. He’s a Christian. Christians pray for people. Perhaps you have noticed the entire religions turns on the belief that a supernatural deity runs the universe and will answer prayers? To ask a Christian not to pray is slightly crazy and annoying. Take it as an expression of kindness or compassion.
That said, one need only google Hitchens for a little bit before you find Christians jumping up and down with glee over the new that the Hitch is sick. This clown: http://blog.nj.com/njv_george_berkin/2010/07/god_is_great_to_christopher_hi.html even went to so far as to claim that god came down and gave Hitchens cancer in order to convert him! Others suggest this is the punishment that awaits all us heathens! (doesn’t explain why the devote end up with cancer or other serious illness though) Still others suggest its an act of “love” by god. Giving someone cancer is love? Yeah, oooookay. I’d hate to see what hate is then.
Fortunately this is NOT what Rod is saying. (The reason I come here is that while I simply do not agree with Rod on religion most of the time, he is reasonable and interesting) I took his post to be a fairly typical Christian expression of compassion for a sick person.
However, Rod, I will say this to you: you have to understand that living in a culture that is, for better or worse, Christian dominated, atheists hear ALOT from believers who tell us that we when get sick or hurt or bad things happen to us, this is a direct result of our godlessness. That god is punishing us in horrible ways for not believing in him, and they will even cite chapter and verse to back up their lunacy. We also get to hear, frequently, about how we have god shaped holes in our hearts and blah blah blah. It can be pretty constant. So all too often (and really just google Hitchens and cancer and you’ll find these sorts of comments everywhere) we don’t get a “get well” for its own sake. We get a “get well by become a believer.”
I realize this is not your view so far as I can tell, but it perhaps is a useful context to consider.
Finally, anyone who thinks this will convert Hitchens to your particular faith….holding your breath that long isn’t healthy.



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NS

posted July 2, 2010 at 3:57 pm


Rod, why do you keep putting notes into my comments? You can use commboxes like the rest of us.
I didn’t say you said that either. Comparisons really aren’t helpful, I’m sorry if I over-emphasized them. It’s the principle. You are wishing a very difficult situation changes who Hitch is. Simply praying for him is fine. Hoping cancer changes his mind about something is not. Andrew has admitted his comment was a bad attempt at humor and that he’d pray for Hitch to piss him off. Fine.
What do you think the benefits of Hitch becoming less hostile to believers would be?



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hlvanburen

posted July 2, 2010 at 10:00 pm


If you really want to rail against a Christian expressing a hope that this situation brings Hitchens “to God” then go here and have at it.
http://blog.nj.com/njv_george_berkin/2010/07/god_is_great_to_christopher_hi.html
And while you are at it compare what this idjit said to what Mr. Dreher said. I’m certain you will see the difference.



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Rick

posted July 3, 2010 at 1:34 am


Instead of prayer how about a contribution to a cancer research organisation. At least some good is being done. Prayer is a waste of time



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Kris Irish

posted July 3, 2010 at 9:31 pm


You all are completely fatuous and puerile if you think any antitheist would cower due to cancer or any other pathology. To have acumen and insight and no pangs of credulity guarantees a dignified recourse to treatment. Only the weak willed and minded fear death to begin with, so in that vein Hitch would not accept any of your prayers, guaranteed. It is the endeavors of the oncologist that saves lives, not the sending of any supplication towards an EMPTY sky.



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The Devil's Dictionary

posted July 5, 2010 at 12:52 am


pray (v)- To ask that the laws of the universe be annulled in behalf of a single petitioner, confessedly unworthy.
[Ambrose Bierce, circa 1900]



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Quiddity

posted July 5, 2010 at 2:30 am


Seems to me that Rod appreciates Hitchens for the stimulating character that he is and only hopes for the best for the man.



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Justin Alexander

posted July 8, 2010 at 6:23 pm


Hitchens doesn’t need prayers, as there is no god. If the medical treatment (the ONLY intervention capable of saving his life) fails, he will accept it as a matter of fact – that all biological organisms eventually die. No doubt, there will be contrived rumors of his requests of contrition and apologies. I can assure you, this will not be the case with this great man.



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Monica

posted July 8, 2010 at 9:56 pm


Just learned tonight that Hithchens is facing chemo and a dire prognosis. Wow. What is amazing to me is Hitchens’ timing on writing his memoir. Check out Jon Stewart’s interview with Hitch about “Hitch-22″: “I’m not dead yet, screw you….Isn’t it [the memoir] a bit soon? Well, maybe….”
http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/tue-june-8-2010/christopher-hitchens
Kudos to the author of this post. Thanks for providing a forum about praying for Hitch. I long for this man to “know that the Lord is God, it is he who made us; we are His”, and for him to be able to rest in the knowledge of God.
Also, here is a link to a two part essay on Hitch from a former adversary-turned-friend, David Horowitz. Written before dx was public.
http://article.nationalreview.com/437551/second-thoughts/david-horowitz



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Scott

posted July 19, 2010 at 8:25 am


Tsk, Tsk…What a small, bitter, and vitriolic little person you are, Kris Irish.



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Why I became Orthodox
Wrapping up my four Beliefnet years, I was thinking about the posts that attracted the most attention and comment in that time. Without a doubt the most popular (in terms of attracting attention, not all of it admiring, to be sure) was the October 12, 2006, entry in which I revealed and explained wh

posted 9:46:58pm Jul. 21, 2010 | read full post »

Modern Calvinists
Wow, they don't make Presbyterians like they used to!

posted 8:47:01pm Jul. 21, 2010 | read full post »

'Rape by deception'? Huh?
The BBC this morning reported on a bizarre case in Israel of an Arab man convicted of "rape by deception," because he'd led the Jewish woman with whom he'd had consensual sex to believe he was Jewish. Ha'aretz has the story here. Plainly it's a racist verdict, and a bizarre one -- but there's more t

posted 7:51:28pm Jul. 21, 2010 | read full post »




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