Project Conversion

Project Conversion


How to Fall. How to Rise.

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It’s my second day as an honorary Latter-day Saint, and I’ve already screwed up. 

How often do we find ourselves on a spiritual high, when the world is ripe and ready for our pleasure, only for a storm to rain on our parade? 

A financial situation took me by surprise yesterday and it felt like a punch in the face. How could this happen? Why didn’t I know about it? Heat rose from my gut, up my throat, and within moments I spewed molten words of anger and frustration at my wife over the phone. She and my daughters were on their way home from the beach and I had not seen them in two days. 

And this is how I beckoned them home?

 

Anger takes us so quickly that, if we are not on guard, it overwhelms us and the levies of our spiritual defenses collapse. I’ve only been a Latter-day Saint for a day. My training foundation isn’t even dry yet. 

So I fell hard, and I knew I was wrong. I lost the warmth I felt while I studied Scripture. The desire to repent was there, but I’m a stubborn man who, at that moment, acted more like a fussy boy. I wanted anger. I wanted that fire in my stomach and throat to burn out on its own. 

But that isn’t what Heavenly Father wants, and this month it’s not about me, but Him. 

“Wherefore teach it unto your children, that all men, everywhere, must repent, or they can in nowise inherit the kingdom of God, for no unclean thing can dwell there, or dwell in his presence.” –Moses 6: 57 

The whole point of this earthly existence is for mankind to gain knowledge and experience via the agency of free will to know right from wrong, wisdom from folly, and realize our relationship as sons and daughters of Heavenly Father. 

“Behold, this is my work and my glory—to bring to pass the immortality and eternal life of man.” –Moses 1: 39 

How can I do that screaming over the phone? 

For the first time in 10 years, the heavy sensation of sin dragged my heart down. What’s worse is that I knew what I had done was wrong during the act. James, the brother of Jesus, described sin this way, “To him that knoweth to do good, and doeth it not, to him is sin.” 

My faith this month prescribes one solution to cleansing sin: repentance and the blood atonement of Jesus Christ.

Repentance…okay, I’m good with that, but I’ve had a problem with the blood atonement concept for years. Why am I wrestling with this so much? Maybe it’s because the theology is familiar. I put it down once, and now I’m picking it up again. But what is the blood atonement?

Jesus Christ “came into the world…to be crucified for the world, and to bear the sins of the world, and to sanctify the world, and to cleanse it from all unrighteousness; that through him all might be saved.” –Doctrines and Covenants 76: 41-42 

According to Latter-day Saints theology, Jesus is a spirit child of God—just as we are—who signed up for and was ordained by Heavenly Father to take on this burden. I still don’t understand why this needed to happen, but I do know that if I want my sin—my anger—wiped away, then I need to accept the actions and teachings of Christ. 

If I am a Mormon, I must surrender. 

But there is hope for me, because even in his lowest and most painful moments, when Jesus begged our Heavenly Father to take the bitter cup of death from his lips, he manned up and said, 

“…not by my will, but yours [God’s].” 

If Jesus had the guts to do God’s will, then I better suck it up, put aside my petty reservations on the particulars, and get down to business. 

According to the text, Gospel Principles, the following steps result in the removal of sin: 

Recognize our sins, Feel sorrow for our sins, Forsake our sins, Confess our sins, Make restitution, Forgive others, Keep the commandments of God. 

In other words, swallow your pride.

Place knees here...

It took a while but I eventually apologized to Heavenly Father and my wife and asked for forgiveness. I’m blessed with a wife and a Heavenly Father who are quick to forgive.

 The road is always treacherous on our way to the Father, but we are assured victory if we trust in God and the example set for us by Jesus. All we have to do is summon the courage to ask for direction and when presented with the Way, take it. 

“Ye must press forward with a steadfastness in Christ, having a perfect brightness of hope, and a love of God and of all men. Wherefore, if ye shall press forward, feasting upon the word of Christ, and endure to the end, behold, thus saith the Father: Ye shall have eternal life.” -2 Nephi 31: 20 

When is the last time you were stubborn and hoarded your sin? If you aren’t religious, how long will it take for you to bury the hatchet you’ve carried around for so long? Sin and guilt are like weights tied to our ankles. Sometimes we’re just too childish to realize that we hold the knife to cut ourselves free.



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Anonymous

posted July 7, 2011 at 9:39 am


What a great topic. Thanks for the link!



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Anonymous

posted July 7, 2011 at 9:39 am


What a great topic. Thanks for the link!



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Colin Faux

posted July 5, 2011 at 3:27 am


Plus, Mosiah 15:1-5 is some of the most confusing scripture in Mormon canon.  I have never heard an explanation to this scripture that makes any sense to me.  Maybe that is my fault, haha.  But really I’m saying I don’t think it should be used to clarify :).



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Colin Faux

posted July 5, 2011 at 3:27 am


Plus, Mosiah 15:1-5 is some of the most confusing scripture in Mormon canon.  I have never heard an explanation to this scripture that makes any sense to me.  Maybe that is my fault, haha.  But really I’m saying I don’t think it should be used to clarify :).



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Colin Faux

posted July 5, 2011 at 3:22 am


And you’re doing a good job!  Truly you have a gift for phenomenology (religious anthropology). Yes foxgoku, Jesus is different than humans in Mormon thought.  But Jesus is also different within Mormonism than most Christian thought and I think Andrew is making that distinction (so cut him some slack :).



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Colin Faux

posted July 5, 2011 at 3:22 am


And you’re doing a good job!  Truly you have a gift for phenomenology (religious anthropology). Yes foxgoku, Jesus is different than humans in Mormon thought.  But Jesus is also different within Mormonism than most Christian thought and I think Andrew is making that distinction (so cut him some slack :).



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Colin Faux

posted July 5, 2011 at 3:15 am


Haha, your mentors (Elders) are going to love you Andrew; raising all the tough questions.  Here is a link with some good citations as to early Mormon though and the priesthood.  Perhaps there is room enough for both wo/men to exercise it?  Perhaps the LDS Church has reason enough to (re)extend the practice?  http://www.mormonheretic.org/2009/05/05/women-and-the-melchizedek-priesthood/



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Colin Faux

posted July 5, 2011 at 3:15 am


Haha, your mentors (Elders) are going to love you Andrew; raising all the tough questions.  Here is a link with some good citations as to early Mormon though and the priesthood.  Perhaps there is room enough for both wo/men to exercise it?  Perhaps the LDS Church has reason enough to (re)extend the practice?  http://www.mormonheretic.org/2009/05/05/women-and-the-melchizedek-priesthood/



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Anonymous

posted July 4, 2011 at 1:53 pm


Thanks!



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Anonymous

posted July 4, 2011 at 1:53 pm


Thanks!



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Alec Bryan

posted July 4, 2011 at 6:41 am


I just posted a long comment and it threw it out. I was saying James as mentioned in your post was Jesus’ half brother, a point Christ was always stern to make about how his father and your father implied a different relationship. I mentioned that John Taylor’s Mediation and the Atonement and McConkie’s works are less cheesy than Robinson and more meaty. And from Non-Mormon literature, Paul Fiddes’ “Past Event and Present Salvation” was enlightening on how the atonement is a creative act. 



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Alec Bryan

posted July 4, 2011 at 6:41 am


I just posted a long comment and it threw it out. I was saying James as mentioned in your post was Jesus’ half brother, a point Christ was always stern to make about how his father and your father implied a different relationship. I mentioned that John Taylor’s Mediation and the Atonement and McConkie’s works are less cheesy than Robinson and more meaty. And from Non-Mormon literature, Paul Fiddes’ “Past Event and Present Salvation” was enlightening on how the atonement is a creative act. 



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Alec Bryan

posted July 4, 2011 at 6:37 am


Liked your comments. Remember, James is actually Jesus’ half brother as God is Jesus’ father. Books on atonement from Mormons. I would avoid Robinson and read the deeper stuff. Mediation and the Atonement by John Taylor and actually a good book is Paul Fiddes, not a Mormon, but way good in theological dissertation called Past Event and Present Salvation. Others too, McConkie skips the cheesy metaphors and delves into the meat. 



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Alec Bryan

posted July 4, 2011 at 6:37 am


Liked your comments. Remember, James is actually Jesus’ half brother as God is Jesus’ father. Books on atonement from Mormons. I would avoid Robinson and read the deeper stuff. Mediation and the Atonement by John Taylor and actually a good book is Paul Fiddes, not a Mormon, but way good in theological dissertation called Past Event and Present Salvation. Others too, McConkie skips the cheesy metaphors and delves into the meat. 



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:39 am


The eternally pregnant issue does seem rather confining, doesn’t it? We’ve recieved some fine answers on this subject and, I think it also warrents its own blog post, completely with explaination from my Mentors. Thanks for bringing up this topic, Niki!



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:39 am


The eternally pregnant issue does seem rather confining, doesn’t it? We’ve recieved some fine answers on this subject and, I think it also warrents its own blog post, completely with explaination from my Mentors. Thanks for bringing up this topic, Niki!



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:36 am


Thanks! This is something I will meditate on and explore this month. Hopefully I won’t cause too much of a stir ; )



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:36 am


Thanks! This is something I will meditate on and explore this month. Hopefully I won’t cause too much of a stir ; )



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:35 am


This is fantastic. Thank you!



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:35 am


This is fantastic. Thank you!



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:30 am


Thank you for sharing this. I think concepts such as the Atonement, which defy reason, give us pause because they only come to be via faith. I do not understand it, and deep down I don’t even agree with it, but that doesn’t change the possibility of it being true. I pray this month asking for understanding and the peace of contentment about this issue. Perhaps it will come…but perhaps not through prayer, but surrender.



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:30 am


Thank you for sharing this. I think concepts such as the Atonement, which defy reason, give us pause because they only come to be via faith. I do not understand it, and deep down I don’t even agree with it, but that doesn’t change the possibility of it being true. I pray this month asking for understanding and the peace of contentment about this issue. Perhaps it will come…but perhaps not through prayer, but surrender.



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:26 am


*Insert creepy ghost-like music* ; )



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:26 am


*Insert creepy ghost-like music* ; )



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:25 am


I agree, and I think you will find that I have not flinched at any controversial issue during any month (that is what Social Issues week is about, after all). My objection is not with the disagreement itself, but only the manner in which it was delivered. My good friend Niki understood that, and now the topic may continue in a calmer, more reflective manner.

I too am learning so much, because all I knew of the faith were the so-called “heresies” and rumors as well!



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:25 am


I agree, and I think you will find that I have not flinched at any controversial issue during any month (that is what Social Issues week is about, after all). My objection is not with the disagreement itself, but only the manner in which it was delivered. My good friend Niki understood that, and now the topic may continue in a calmer, more reflective manner.

I too am learning so much, because all I knew of the faith were the so-called “heresies” and rumors as well!



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:22 am


We cling to the strangest things, don’t we Chris? The power, like you said, is in recognizing the problem.



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:22 am


We cling to the strangest things, don’t we Chris? The power, like you said, is in recognizing the problem.



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digital flaneur

posted July 3, 2011 at 2:40 am


The language may be harsh, Andrew– particularly the adjective “awful”– but the issue of the Divine Feminine and sexism within religion is a very important one, and one that is usually swept under the tablel. I think we should all be prepared to examine a faith on its own merits, especially a very misunderstood faith like LDS, and that’s what PC is about of course, but avoiding issues like the exclusion of women and female pronouns under the banner of accepting all faiths doesn’t get us anywhere, imho. 

I will find this month very challenging as well! But I’m looking forward to learning about the Mormon faith, which I know very little about, and pretty much all of it negative heresay, unfortunately… :( 



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digital flaneur

posted July 3, 2011 at 2:40 am


The language may be harsh, Andrew– particularly the adjective “awful”– but the issue of the Divine Feminine and sexism within religion is a very important one, and one that is usually swept under the tablel. I think we should all be prepared to examine a faith on its own merits, especially a very misunderstood faith like LDS, and that’s what PC is about of course, but avoiding issues like the exclusion of women and female pronouns under the banner of accepting all faiths doesn’t get us anywhere, imho. 

I will find this month very challenging as well! But I’m looking forward to learning about the Mormon faith, which I know very little about, and pretty much all of it negative heresay, unfortunately… :( 



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ChrisH

posted July 3, 2011 at 2:27 am


I’ve been doing that same thing a lot, and every time I see what I’m doing and how I can get rid of such negative emotion, and yet I am reluctant to let go it, even though I can feel how much it ruins me. This will provide me with some reinforcement when I need it. Funny how coincidences like this work…



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ChrisH

posted July 3, 2011 at 2:27 am


I’ve been doing that same thing a lot, and every time I see what I’m doing and how I can get rid of such negative emotion, and yet I am reluctant to let go it, even though I can feel how much it ruins me. This will provide me with some reinforcement when I need it. Funny how coincidences like this work…



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laura bradbury

posted July 2, 2011 at 9:48 pm


Here’s a link to a great talk by President Gordon B. Hinckley (who was prophet until his death in 2008) that might give you some additional understanding on this topic.  There are countless other writings of modern day prophets that help us to better understand topics that aren’t adequately focused upon in the scriptures (and they are considered to be scripture):    http://lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jspvgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db010VgnVCM1000004d82620aRCRD&locale=0&sourceId=956a94bf3938b010VgnVCM1000004d82620a____&hideNav=1



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laura bradbury

posted July 2, 2011 at 9:48 pm


Here’s a link to a great talk by President Gordon B. Hinckley (who was prophet until his death in 2008) that might give you some additional understanding on this topic.  There are countless other writings of modern day prophets that help us to better understand topics that aren’t adequately focused upon in the scriptures (and they are considered to be scripture):    http://lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jspvgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db010VgnVCM1000004d82620aRCRD&locale=0&sourceId=956a94bf3938b010VgnVCM1000004d82620a____&hideNav=1



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 8:07 pm


Why is there so little focus on this Mother aspect? Is there any scriptural support? Thanks for bring this up!



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 8:07 pm


Why is there so little focus on this Mother aspect? Is there any scriptural support? Thanks for bring this up!



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Jenni

posted July 2, 2011 at 7:50 pm


Mormon theology is actually the one Christian theology that I’m aware of that DOES teach a female deity. As Colin pointed out, we believe that God the Father has a wife–God the Mother. The hymn “O My Father” by Eliza R Snow teaches this more clearly than anything else.

O my Father, thou that dwellest

In the high and glorious place,

When shall I regain thy presence

And again behold thy face?

In thy holy habitation,

Did my spirit once reside?

In my first primeval childhood

Was I nurtured near thy side?

For a wise and glorious purpose

Thou hast placed me here on earth

And withheld the recollection

Of my former friends and birth;

Yet ofttimes a secret something

Whispered, “You’re a stranger here,”

And I felt that I had wandered

From a more exalted sphere.

I had learned to call thee Father,

Thru thy Spirit from on high,

But, until the key of knowledge

Was restored, I knew not why.

In the heav’ns are parents single?

No, the thought makes reason stare!

Truth is reason; truth eternal

Tells me I’ve a mother there.

When I leave this frail existence,

When I lay this mortal by,

Father, Mother, may I meet you

In your royal courts on high?

Then, at length, when I’ve completed

All you sent me forth to do,

With your mutual approbation

Let me come and dwell with you.



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Jenni

posted July 2, 2011 at 7:50 pm


Mormon theology is actually the one Christian theology that I’m aware of that DOES teach a female deity. As Colin pointed out, we believe that God the Father has a wife–God the Mother. The hymn “O My Father” by Eliza R Snow teaches this more clearly than anything else.

O my Father, thou that dwellest

In the high and glorious place,

When shall I regain thy presence

And again behold thy face?

In thy holy habitation,

Did my spirit once reside?

In my first primeval childhood

Was I nurtured near thy side?

For a wise and glorious purpose

Thou hast placed me here on earth

And withheld the recollection

Of my former friends and birth;

Yet ofttimes a secret something

Whispered, “You’re a stranger here,”

And I felt that I had wandered

From a more exalted sphere.

I had learned to call thee Father,

Thru thy Spirit from on high,

But, until the key of knowledge

Was restored, I knew not why.

In the heav’ns are parents single?

No, the thought makes reason stare!

Truth is reason; truth eternal

Tells me I’ve a mother there.

When I leave this frail existence,

When I lay this mortal by,

Father, Mother, may I meet you

In your royal courts on high?

Then, at length, when I’ve completed

All you sent me forth to do,

With your mutual approbation

Let me come and dwell with you.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:43 pm

Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:43 pm

Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:43 pm

Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:43 pm

Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:43 pm

Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:43 pm

Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:43 pm

Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:43 pm

Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:33 pm


That was a great scriptural reference Austin. Thank you.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:33 pm


That was a great scriptural reference Austin. Thank you.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:31 pm


Thanks for the clarification. I’m not accustomed to the LDS notion to the relationship between Jesus and God, however the information I have comes from both LDS literature and the Elders. I’ll do my best to understand them , of course.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:31 pm


Thanks for the clarification. I’m not accustomed to the LDS notion to the relationship between Jesus and God, however the information I have comes from both LDS literature and the Elders. I’ll do my best to understand them , of course.



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AustinSFaux

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:16 pm


Don’t worry Andrew, I screwed up too yesterday.  My wife and I got into a fight over something stupid, baby snot….hehehe.  I repented too.  I also read a scripture in Matthew 12:34-35, “…out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh.  A good man out of the good treasure of the heart bringeth forth good things; and an evil man out of the evil treasure bringeth forth evil things.”  Now I’m not saying you and I are evil people for making a mistake, and yelling at our different wives.  But what I recognized is that I want to grow in love for my family, even working towards that so the abundance of my heart can bring forth more good things, and less accidental arguments.  

Thanks,
Austin-



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AustinSFaux

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:16 pm


Don’t worry Andrew, I screwed up too yesterday.  My wife and I got into a fight over something stupid, baby snot….hehehe.  I repented too.  I also read a scripture in Matthew 12:34-35, “…out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh.  A good man out of the good treasure of the heart bringeth forth good things; and an evil man out of the evil treasure bringeth forth evil things.”  Now I’m not saying you and I are evil people for making a mistake, and yelling at our different wives.  But what I recognized is that I want to grow in love for my family, even working towards that so the abundance of my heart can bring forth more good things, and less accidental arguments.  

Thanks,
Austin-



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 5:48 pm


Thanks for that, Michael. Private message me on facebook or give me a call.



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Michael J. Solender

posted July 2, 2011 at 5:16 pm


Andrew – anger is a very human emotion. Forgive yourself as well and know that you can learn from these episodes how to moderate and control your emotion – I am glad the mrs. and the HF are quick to forgive – on another subject I have a q for you off line when you have a chance.



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Michael J. Solender

posted July 2, 2011 at 5:16 pm


Andrew – anger is a very human emotion. Forgive yourself as well and know that you can learn from these episodes how to moderate and control your emotion – I am glad the mrs. and the HF are quick to forgive – on another subject I have a q for you off line when you have a chance.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 4:54 pm


Thanks for this insight!



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 4:54 pm


Thanks for this insight!



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Colin Faux

posted July 2, 2011 at 3:47 pm


Niki, I can recognize how studying liberation and feminist theology may give you a gag reflect when comparing it to LDS (Mormon) theology.  I do not have as much experience with liberation and feminist theology as you, but I was taught by a professor who was taught by James Cone (black liberation theologist, who I’m sure you’re aware of, I’m using parenthesis for others benefit).  My comment is only to give a little bit of background toward the LDS perspective.  The LDS people believe that their founder, Joseph Smith, experienced a literal/actual event with the divine when Joseph was 14 years old.  According to LDS interpretation of Joseph’s account, he saw God “The Father” and his son Jesus Christ the “Beloved Son”.  Both divine entities, God and Jesus, had literal glorified/perfected/resurrected (whatever term LDS individuals want to use) bodies of immortal flesh and blood.  The LDS Church is full of masculine language to describe God/Jesus as ultimate divine realities because according to LDS belief, they have actual male bodies.  Now I’m not trying to argue for or against the belief, I’m simply trying to explain the perspective of the belief. 

However, there are also female divinities within Mormonism as well.  It is not widely talked about or incorporated into LDS standardization however it is there.  Here is a reference on Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heavenly_Mother_%28Mormonism%29



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Colin Faux

posted July 2, 2011 at 3:47 pm


Niki, I can recognize how studying liberation and feminist theology may give you a gag reflect when comparing it to LDS (Mormon) theology.  I do not have as much experience with liberation and feminist theology as you, but I was taught by a professor who was taught by James Cone (black liberation theologist, who I’m sure you’re aware of, I’m using parenthesis for others benefit).  My comment is only to give a little bit of background toward the LDS perspective.  The LDS people believe that their founder, Joseph Smith, experienced a literal/actual event with the divine when Joseph was 14 years old.  According to LDS interpretation of Joseph’s account, he saw God “The Father” and his son Jesus Christ the “Beloved Son”.  Both divine entities, God and Jesus, had literal glorified/perfected/resurrected (whatever term LDS individuals want to use) bodies of immortal flesh and blood.  The LDS Church is full of masculine language to describe God/Jesus as ultimate divine realities because according to LDS belief, they have actual male bodies.  Now I’m not trying to argue for or against the belief, I’m simply trying to explain the perspective of the belief. 

However, there are also female divinities within Mormonism as well.  It is not widely talked about or incorporated into LDS standardization however it is there.  Here is a reference on Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heavenly_Mother_%28Mormonism%29



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 2:51 pm


Indeed, the pursuit of perfection, or in the case of this month, Christ-like.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 2:51 pm


Indeed, the pursuit of perfection, or in the case of this month, Christ-like.



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Fluffytheturtle

posted July 2, 2011 at 2:47 pm


Fabulous post, Andrew. You have developed a very clear understanding of the principles of repentance. You said that on your second day as an honorary Latter-day Saint, you’ve already screwed up. Feeling anger is not screwing up; we only screw up when we allow ourselves to become prisoner to our anger, and it sounds to me like you escaped from that bondage pretty quickly. This life isn’t about having perfect thoughts, words, and deeds; it’s about working on our imperfections, and you are doing that “perfectly.”



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Fluffytheturtle

posted July 2, 2011 at 2:47 pm


Fabulous post, Andrew. You have developed a very clear understanding of the principles of repentance. You said that on your second day as an honorary Latter-day Saint, you’ve already screwed up. Feeling anger is not screwing up; we only screw up when we allow ourselves to become prisoner to our anger, and it sounds to me like you escaped from that bondage pretty quickly. This life isn’t about having perfect thoughts, words, and deeds; it’s about working on our imperfections, and you are doing that “perfectly.”



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 2:28 pm


Very true.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 2:28 pm


Very true.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 2:26 pm


Oh Niki, your life’s work is of great value. I especially enjoyed the female aspect of the divine during Hinduism (Shakti and Parvati) and so your focus reminds me beautifully of that.

Please, your perspectives are more than welcome here. We can discuss and debate, but with warmth, kindness, and a spirit of respect. Afterall, we know that “Truth is one, but the wise call it many names.”

Thank you for bring another name to the table. I will sit with you in spirit in my own ashram, if welcome.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 2:26 pm


Oh Niki, your life’s work is of great value. I especially enjoyed the female aspect of the divine during Hinduism (Shakti and Parvati) and so your focus reminds me beautifully of that.

Please, your perspectives are more than welcome here. We can discuss and debate, but with warmth, kindness, and a spirit of respect. Afterall, we know that “Truth is one, but the wise call it many names.”

Thank you for bring another name to the table. I will sit with you in spirit in my own ashram, if welcome.



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Joan Anderson

posted July 2, 2011 at 1:53 pm


We almost never know what form our lessons will take or how others will react to them. : )



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Joan Anderson

posted July 2, 2011 at 1:53 pm


We almost never know what form our lessons will take or how others will react to them. : )



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Niki Whiting

posted July 2, 2011 at 1:34 pm


You’re right. I’ve spent my adult life working on liberation and feminist theology and clearly I have a lot of baggage around standard God language. I can see I have *a lot* to work on. I don’t think all theologies are equal, but if I want to debate the merits of a particular theology I can go write a paper for academia and leave it out of the Project Conversion Ward. I am sorry and I appologize: to you, to your fellow Mormons, and to rest of the congregation.

Your response is particularly apt as I am working on a post about ahimsa! I think I need to go sit for a bit. Your month is challenging me already.



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Niki Whiting

posted July 2, 2011 at 1:34 pm


You’re right. I’ve spent my adult life working on liberation and feminist theology and clearly I have a lot of baggage around standard God language. I can see I have *a lot* to work on. I don’t think all theologies are equal, but if I want to debate the merits of a particular theology I can go write a paper for academia and leave it out of the Project Conversion Ward. I am sorry and I appologize: to you, to your fellow Mormons, and to rest of the congregation.

Your response is particularly apt as I am working on a post about ahimsa! I think I need to go sit for a bit. Your month is challenging me already.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 12:18 pm


This type of comment is a first for Project Conversion, and it breaks my heart that of all people, a student of the Eternal Dharma would use such harsh language toward the faith of another.

I do not ask everyone to agree, but Project Conversion is about bringing kindness and a willingness to share and learn from one another. This is not the way of the rishis, Niki, thank you for reminding us of that.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 12:18 pm


This type of comment is a first for Project Conversion, and it breaks my heart that of all people, a student of the Eternal Dharma would use such harsh language toward the faith of another.

I do not ask everyone to agree, but Project Conversion is about bringing kindness and a willingness to share and learn from one another. This is not the way of the rishis, Niki, thank you for reminding us of that.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 12:18 pm


This type of comment is a first for Project Conversion, and it breaks my heart that of all people, a student of the Eternal Dharma would use such harsh language toward the faith of another.

I do not ask everyone to agree, but Project Conversion is about bringing kindness and a willingness to share and learn from one another. This is not the way of the rishis, Niki, thank you for reminding us of that.



report abuse
 

Niki Whiting

posted July 2, 2011 at 11:02 am


I’m going to have a hard time following you this month. All the masculine God language and blood atonement….. oof. Such awful theology! It kills me. Makes me dread my season of revisiting Christianity even more than I already am.



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Niki Whiting

posted July 2, 2011 at 11:02 am


I’m going to have a hard time following you this month. All the masculine God language and blood atonement….. oof. Such awful theology! It kills me. Makes me dread my season of revisiting Christianity even more than I already am.



report abuse
 

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