Project Conversion

Project Conversion


Welcome to the Zarathushti Faith

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First of all, let’s address the title of this post. Zarathushti? I thought this was the Zoroastrian month. Never fear. Through my 12 hours of intense research, including several lengthy phone calls with my Mentor, I discovered that the term “Zoroastrian” comes from a Greek derivative of the the name Zarathushtra to Zoroaster. Get it? Good. So I will call the religion by its proper name, and now, you’re privy to this detail as well.
Also, as with many faiths, the Zarathushti religion is not entirely monolithic–that is–not everyone practices the same thing. The source communities of Zarathushti’s are in Iran (where the religion began) and India (called Parsis). My Mentor is a Parsi, so any method of worship or daily practice you see here will be a reflection of her teachings (and those of others) as a Parsi

With that out of the way, let’s give the Zarathushti Faith a nice, big, Project Conversion welcome and look into what I’ll get into this month.

To begin with, I’ll walk around looking like this:

Me wearing the topi (prayer cap)

This is a topi or prayer cap. As with many faiths, head coverings are an essential piece of religious gear that typically symbolize humility. In the Zarathushti tradition, the topi serves two purposes: 1) the crown of the head is the location of the Lahian, a Center of spiritual knowledge. A constant temperature is needed here to maintain balance and creative thought. 2) There are many influences, both physical and spiritual, that interact with our bodies and soul (Urvaan). These include everything from the sun’s rays to negative thoughts and spirits. The topi then serves as a selectively porous membrane to filter good material from negative.

Keep in mind, my explanation here is very basic and I am still trying to wrap my mind around many concepts. If you’re interested in going much, much deeper, visit this Parsi website. Zarathushtis are enjoined to wear a head covering at all times–not just during prayer. Many are electing not to wear the topi due to social pressure via Western style and influence. I will wear the topi at all times.

Prayer:

There are many prayers. Many, many prayers. Part of the reason I didn’t make a post on Day 1 was because I spent most of the day trying to discern what prayers are said when and how and…there’s a prayer one should do before and after visiting the bathroom. Exactly. So where do you begin?

Mentors are awesome. My Mentor, who is the former editor of Fezana Journal, a publication that serves Zarathushtis across the United States, helped me to understand that while all of the prayers are important, only a few are actually required or Farajyat. She recommended that I start each day with the Padyab-Kushti prayer and end the day with the same to get me through the month. It’s pretty long, so I won’t write it out here. For details on all prayers, go to this site. The source material for many if not all prayers comes from the Gathas and Avesta. More on that later.

Reciting the Kushti prayer

Here I am reciting the Kushti prayer at 5:30 this morning. All prayers are performed either after a shower or ritual ablution. There are several parts which include the Ahsem Vohu (invocation of Asha) and the Ahunwar (most sacred manthra of the Faith). The latter segments are short and can be found at www.avesta.org. Notice that I am reading the prayers from a page. In most cases, prayer is performed while standing with hands together (common prayer position) if you are a Parsi, and hands out in front with palms facing you if you’re from Iran. Different flavors. I love it.

There are other, more important aspects of the Kushti prayer that I cannot perform. This includes the tying and untying of the kushti (sacred thread made of lamb’s wool) around the waist over the sacred under-shirt called the sudreh. I cannot stress enough the importance of these two items. They are given to a young Zarathushti during an initiation ceremony and worn for life. For me to even wear a substitution would be a great insult to the faith. As you all know, I’m not here to insult or intrude upon anyone; but to learn and come to a higher level of respect for those around me. Therefore, I will not wear these items.

Here are a few images for your reference.

The kushti thread over the sudreh under-shirt

 

Tying the knot of the kushti while in prayer

Zarathushti homes also have common religious features. Among them is an altar. Light in general and fire in particular are powerful symbols of the divine (Ahura Mazda). In fact, Zarathushti places of worship are refered to as “fire temples.” Zarathushtis are dedicated to knowledge and the defeat of evil and ignorance. Light then, symbolizes the displacement of evil by the warmth and illumination that comes from both the grace and power of Ahura Mazda and the work of mankind. The three-fold call to action of all Zarathushtis are “Good thoughts, Good words, and Good deeds.”

My Mentor recommend a simple altar for me, the center of which is a candle that remains lit so long as someone is home:

From left to right, the altar includes: a flower to represent Ahura Mazda’s creation. Top-center: an image of Prophet Zarathushtra, candle, a picture of my departed grandfather.

Not every altar is the same. In fact, many homes have only a hearth in which to stir the holy flame that is to burn continuously. My Mentor said that keeping a photo of special ancestors on the altar is not only a source of comfort, but reminds us to pray for them and to remind us of their spiritual presence in our lives. My grandfather was a Baptist minister and died when I was four years old. I don’t remember him physically, but I have always felt a spiritual bond between us.

So, this should get us started. It’s only the tip of the iceberg folks. The first week is always the most difficult because I must shed the garments of my previous religion and dive right into the next. Of course the first week of every month deals with rituals and practices, so stay tuned for more details and thanks for reading along.



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Comments read comments(16)
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Anonymous

posted March 6, 2011 at 11:20 am


Ushta te, Jonquil



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Anonymous

posted March 6, 2011 at 11:20 am


Ushta te, Jonquil



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Anonymous

posted March 4, 2011 at 1:20 pm


I think it’s all of these things, Susan. Over and over again I see the
analogy of a soldier and his uniform. These items are a type of identifier
with their people and culture, as well as a physical reminder–as you
said–of their bond with the divine.



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Anonymous

posted March 4, 2011 at 1:20 pm


I think it’s all of these things, Susan. Over and over again I see the
analogy of a soldier and his uniform. These items are a type of identifier
with their people and culture, as well as a physical reminder–as you
said–of their bond with the divine.



report abuse
 

susan

posted March 3, 2011 at 11:01 pm


Interesting that accoutrement does indeed mean much in the practice of traditional religious rituals. Perhaps it serves as a physical reminder, or maybe it is a leveling of the field, creating a oneness of participants, separating one from the rest of the day’s routine life.



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susan

posted March 3, 2011 at 11:01 pm


Interesting that accoutrement does indeed mean much in the practice of traditional religious rituals. Perhaps it serves as a physical reminder, or maybe it is a leveling of the field, creating a oneness of participants, separating one from the rest of the day’s routine life.



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Anonymous

posted March 3, 2011 at 2:40 am


Oh man, haha no pressure there! Hopefully I don’t mess up too much ; )



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Anonymous

posted March 3, 2011 at 2:40 am


Oh man, haha no pressure there! Hopefully I don’t mess up too much ; )



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Shawn K

posted March 2, 2011 at 6:26 pm


This has been the religion which has held the most appeal and sort of “gut-level” draw for me for some years now. I’m going to be following you even more attentively this month than I had been so far.



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Shawn K

posted March 2, 2011 at 6:26 pm


This has been the religion which has held the most appeal and sort of “gut-level” draw for me for some years now. I’m going to be following you even more attentively this month than I had been so far.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted March 2, 2011 at 3:39 pm


You are most welcome Penny.

The lack of available English translations is just one of many aspects of this month that will be difficult. I currenly recite prayers from a printed sheet via the Avesta website. There are a few Gathas (hymns of Zarathushtra) in English on site like Amazon and Barnes and Noble, but because there are no reviews and scant details, it’s hard to tell what reliable and what’s not!

If I find a good translation I’ll let all of you know.



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Anonymous

posted March 2, 2011 at 3:39 pm


You are most welcome Penny.

The lack of available English translations is just one of many aspects of this month that will be difficult. I currenly recite prayers from a printed sheet via the Avesta website. There are a few Gathas (hymns of Zarathushtra) in English on site like Amazon and Barnes and Noble, but because there are no reviews and scant details, it’s hard to tell what reliable and what’s not!

If I find a good translation I’ll let all of you know.



report abuse
 

Penny Green

posted March 2, 2011 at 3:27 pm


Thanks Andrew. I love your respectful attitude towards that which is sacred to another culture/faith. Thanks also for the link to the Avesta site. I have wanted to add the writings of Zarathusthti to my morning devotions for some time, but they aren’t readily available in book form.



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Penny Green

posted March 2, 2011 at 3:27 pm


Thanks Andrew. I love your respectful attitude towards that which is sacred to another culture/faith. Thanks also for the link to the Avesta site. I have wanted to add the writings of Zarathusthti to my morning devotions for some time, but they aren’t readily available in book form.



report abuse
 

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