Beliefnet
Progressive Revival

John Green, Dan Gilgoff, and Steven Waldman just released this breakdown and analysis of the 12 religious voting blocks and their potential effect on the 2008 election.  What a shock for those of us on the “religious left” who have been laboring for decades feeling that we are outnumbered and under siege to realize that our numbers (12.7%) are almost identical to those on the “religious right. (12.9%) The right may have an edge in organization and funding but we have numbers on our side. 
As this investigation shows – religious does not equal conservative.  Earlier this summer there was a report by Pew that reminded us that Obama leads McCain in 18 out of 19 religious groups. I wonder if those of you who are looking at the grid of religion and politics below also see the potential for organizing and solidarity.  Given the difficult times that are upon us, especially in the economy, we will need the hope and perseverance that our communities of faith can sustain. There is a lot in this report to cause hope for those of us who see religion as a major inspiration for progressive politics.  
The 12 Tribes
 
Moral issues are dramatically less important this year than in previous years – even among the most religiously observant voters, according to the 2008 edition of the Twelve Tribes of American PoliticsJust 13% listed social issues first, half the number who did in the summer of 2004. 61% listed the economy first compared to 32% in 2004.


The 2008 Twelve Tribes survey, conducted from June-August, also found: 

  • A massive shift among Latino Protestants is what has fueled the hugely important move of Hispanics to the Democratic Party (more). 

  • The centrist Tribes – Convertible Catholics, Whitebread Protestants and Moderate Evangelicals – have moved to the left on some social issues but have become more suspicious of government spending programs. Republicans remain strong with these groups (more). 

Click here for the McCain-Obama breakdown, the full survey results, themethodology or Steven Waldman’s full analysis.

Click here for the full story on Beliefnet

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