Prayer, Plain and Simple

Prayer, Plain and Simple

More on Learning how to Pray – from Kids

posted by Mark Herringshaw

A nun once asked the students in her class to write a letter to God.  Here are some of the results. Lessons in honest and simple prayer:

 

Dear God:

If you watch me in church on Sunday, I’ll show You my new shoes.

- Mickey

 

Dear God:

Did You mean for the giraffe to look like that or was it an accident?

- Norma

 

Dear God:

Thank you for the baby brother, but what I prayed for was a puppy.

- Joyce

 

Dear God:

Please send me a pony. I never asked for anything before.  You can look it up.

- Bruce

 

Dear God:

I want to be just like my Daddy when I get big, but not with so much hair all over.

- Sam

 

Dear God:

I think about You sometimes even when I’m not praying.

- Elliot

 

Dear God:

Thank you for the baby brother but what I asked for was a puppy.  

- Joyce

Dear God:

You don’t have to worry about me.  I always look both ways.
- Dean

Dear God:

My brother told me about being born but it doesn’t sound right.  

- Marsha

Dear God:

I am doing the best I can.  

Frank

 

Go and do likewise: Short, sweet, honest, true!

Learning from Expert Prayer Coaches – Children

posted by Mark Herringshaw

Children are not instinctively religious. Once when a preacher’s sermon dragged on beyond supposed 12:00 noon scheduled close one little girl leaned over to her mother and whispered, “Mommy, if we give him the money now, will he let us go?”  Irreverent, perhaps, but honest. 

 

Paradoxically, it is this bluntness that makes children the most natural pray-ers.  Jesus says as much in an exchange with his students recorded in Matthew 18.  His followers asked him how rank would be determined after the coup they assumed (erroneously) he was mounting against the Roman occupation.  They asked, “Who will be the greatest?”  His answer stunned them.  He called a little child to stand beside him and said, “Here is your role model.  If you want to know how to live life as I have designed it, become like this child.” 

 

Anyone who has heard a child pray understands the radical implications of Jesus’ answer.  Children are generally oblivious – until we condition them otherwise – to the prim and proper forms of right religion.  For a child, talking to God is just that – talking.  No matter is too small or too great for prayer.  I have listened to my own children pray for farmers who need rain for crops, every orphaned child in the world, and a sick toad all in the same breath.  They really can teach us something.

 

Here’s a challenge: Listen to a child pray today, and go and do likewise!

If and only if… part 4

posted by Mark Herringshaw

Jesus makes bold and audacious promises about the power and effectiveness of prayer.  If we ask, we will receive. But in the process of making claims Jesus also connects specific conditions to these promises.  Here’s one final dangerous “if/then.”

 

Special access: “If you remain in me and my words remain in you ask whatever you wish and it will be given you” John 15:7.  Here is a controversy.  Christian prayer is discriminatory.  When Christians pray they do so wielding a special password: the name of Jesus, who they believe to be the Son of God. 

 

This narrow, and narrowing condition has cost Christians dearly.  Down through history many cultures of reacted vehemently to the explicit exclusiveness this condition claims. That is, those who pray in Jesus’ name have access, and those who pray without Jesus’ name do not.  The Romans of the first and second centuries would not mind an additional deity added to their pantheon. But when Christians insisted their path was the only true course, all hell broke loose, literally. Followers of Jesus in India today suffer under similar persecution.  Some Hindus who worship many gods do not object to anyone adding Jesus to the list.  What they do not tolerate his soul allegiance to Jesus alone.  Hundreds of Christians in recent years have lost their lives because of such allegiance.

 

Pluralism is a simpler course. But like it or not Christian prayer is narrow.  Jesus said, “You may ask me for anything in my name, and I will do it” John 14:14.  That tag line “in my name” means through my access. Having Jesus’ name prefacing a prayer guarantees an audience with God. The right to leverage Jesus’ name in prayer is literally the power of attorney to assign his identity to our intercession.  And this, Christians believe is the key to the release of restorative spiritual power into this broken world.  “I am the way, and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me” John 13:6.  As hard as it is for pluralists to swallow, Christian prayer is not generic. 

 

This is not to say that God only answers Christians’ prayers. There are many examples of God acting in response to non-Christians’ requests. It is a claim that a Christian’s prayer is given special access because of the relationship Christians have with God through Jesus. Family matters. I will listen and respond when my neighbor’s child asks me to untangle his kite from my tree. I will listen and respond with a higher level of commitment if my son makes the same request. Family matters and Jesus is family. When I use his name I get special insider treatment.

 

What do you think? Does God grant Christians special access because of their association with Jesus?  

If and only if… part 3

posted by Mark Herringshaw

There’s a third Biblical condition to answered prayer. Jesus lays down amazing promises about the power of asking things from God. He promises to answer. You can check out Thursday’s post if you’d like to see a few of those commitments. Bottom line: God puts himself on the line to deliver what we pray for!

 

Yet as bold as these promises are, they come with specific conditions: “If and only if…” God honor his promises to answer prayer when conditions he’s set are met. Here’s another one of those conditions:

 

Agreement: “If two of you on earth agree about anything you ask for, it will be done for you by my Father in heaven” (Matthew 18:19).  While prayer is a gift that God gives to every individual, Jesus adds a kind of check and balance to what can easily become a very subjective process.  In this conditional promise Jesus makes prayer a corporate matter.  Effective requests come to God as petitions with more than one signature attached.  Why? Perhaps God is as concerned with our human-to-human relationships as he is with our God-to-human relationship.  Six of the ten commands in Exodus 20 direct us how to relate with other people. Human beings are not made for isolation.  In fact Paul suggests at several points in his letters to early Christians that individual people cannot find their true identity outside of healthy relationships with other people who have connected their own lives to Jesus.

 

According to Jesus, God has built into the prayer-response process a requirement of human cooperation. Prayer like everything else in human experience must be a social experience.  Beyond this there is a simple practical concern answered by this stipulation: when two or more people jointly submit a request there is at least some protection against unchecked self-interest. The requirement of agreement is a simple accountability tool. 

 

Do you have anyone to pray with, to agree with on the things you are bringing to God. A prayer partner is one of the most powerful relationships you can cultivate. People in this prayer blog community can become a kind of agreement team. And if you can find someone face to face, that’s great too. Either way, get someone to agree with you, and ask, together.

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