Beliefnet
Prayer, Plain and Simple

Jesus’ “Lord’s Prayer” serves as a kind of jazz chart for intercession.  He lays down the melody line, the rhythm, the key and the basic chord progression. Then he invites us to improvise with variations of individual expression. 

 

This model for prayer does not stand in isolation. Jesus seasons much of his other teaching with astounding promises of how God will respond to genuine prayer.  He builds this hands-on seminar on a foundation of daring, audacious commitments from God.  Jesus promises that prayer will change things.  Or rather, God will change things when we pray. 

 

Here are just a few examples of these promises. 

“Have faith in God,” Jesus answered.  “I tell you the truth, if anyone says to this mountain, “Go, throw yourself in to the sea,” and does not doubt in his heart but believes that what he says will happen, it will be done for him.  Therefore I tell you, whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours” Mark 11:23,24. 

 

“Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you.  For everyone who asks receives; he who seeks finds; and to him who knocks, the door will be opened” Matthew 7:7,8. 

 

“I tell you the truth, anyone who has faith in me will do what I have been doing.  He will do even greater things than these, because I am going to the Father.  And I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Son may bring glory to the Father.  You may ask me for anything in my name, and I will do it” John 14:12-14. 

 

“I tell you the truth, if you have faith and do not doubt, not only can you do what was done to the fig tree, but also you can say to this mountain, ‘go throw yourself into the sea and it will be done.  If you believe, you will receive whatever you ask for in prayer” Matthew 21:21. 

Downright startling. God didn’t have to put himself on the line like this, but he does. He invites boldness and courage and persistence in our prayers. ASK!

 

What are you asking for?

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