O Me of Little Faith

O Me of Little Faith


The Horror of Puppets and the Sinner’s Prayer

posted by Jason Boyett

My lifelong companionship with spiritual doubt began during my childhood, after my Christian salvation experience. It has to do with a lot of things, including the intensely evangelistic culture I grew up in where “making a decision for Christ” and/or “praying the sinner’s prayer” and/or “asking Jesus into your heart” were front and center of everything. 

The were both the first steps and the pinnacle of the Christian faith (despite there not being any clear language about saying this prayer in the Bible). It took me several years to get up the nerve to do this, because it also required a public profession of my faith in front of the whole church, and I was terribly shy. That kind of thing scared me to death, almost as much as the thought of going to hell if I died without having prayed the prayer of salvation. (This gets a whole chapter, by the way, in O Me of Little Faith.)

Then again, I may also have seen this video of the puppet “Stephanie” explaining how to become a Christian, and it also is terrifying. I can’t imagine her convincing children of anything other than the fact that puppets are possibly demonic. Shudder.

 

[H/T: Christian Nightmares]



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mouseypapesh

posted June 4, 2010 at 10:58 am


I agree that puppet is possibly demonic, the only thing she convinced me of is that I’m gonna have nightmares for the next week (I’m 40 years old!) That’s creepy! :s



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Kevin Leggett

posted June 4, 2010 at 12:42 pm


You know what makes it demonic…the puppet never blinks!



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Alise

posted June 4, 2010 at 3:23 pm


My kids have a love/hate relationship with this video. My younger daughter keeps asking to watch “that creepy puppet video.” I don’t know what to make of that!



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Headless Unicorn Guy

posted June 4, 2010 at 4:39 pm



the intensely evangelistic culture I grew up in where “making a decision for Christ” and/or “praying the sinner’s prayer” and/or “asking Jesus into your heart” were front and center of everything.

Over at Slacktivist, they call this the “Say-the-Magic-Words” concept of Salvation.
The were both the first steps and the pinnacle of the Christian faith (despite there not being any clear language about saying this prayer in the Bible).
That’s because except for the tacked-on “invitation” ending, it’s a direct knockoff of a Catholic prayer called the Act of Contrition.
Then again, I may also have seen this video of the puppet “Stephanie” explaining how to become a Christian, and it also is terrifying. I can’t imagine her convincing children of anything other than the fact that puppets are possibly demonic. Shudder…
Serious nightmare fuel there. (Chucky, Move Over!) Looks like a “vent figure” based on those little “troll dolls” from the late Sixties.
As for Puppets are Demonic, that’s probably dogma somewhere. Especially after the one about Demon-Possessed Cabbage Patch Dolls made it onto 700 Club, I wouldn’t put any weirdness past them. Hmmmm…. Cabbage Patch Dolls were Demon-Possessed and Satanic, yet similar puppets are a real common Witnessing Tool (TM)…



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Travis Mamone

posted June 4, 2010 at 6:41 pm


There’s this video circulating online of this creepy puppet named Little Marcy singing “I’ll Be a Sunbeam for Jesus.” Looks like Chucky’s second cousin!
I prefer the Nirvana version, “Jesus Don’t Want Me for a Sunbeam.”



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Cecelia Dowdy

posted June 5, 2010 at 8:44 am


I doubt the puppet would have had an impact on me as a child since I was raised a Jehovah’s Witness and, at the time, I’d been told that all other religions were automatically considered “wrong”.
Even if I wasn’t raised that way, I don’t think, as a child, I would’ve really understood Stephanie….plus, I do believe that the puppet would’ve given me nightmares. She does look a bit crazy.
~Cecelia Dowdy~
Christian Fiction Author



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Sarah the Youth (and Puppeteer)

posted June 5, 2010 at 10:24 am


Okay, that puppet is definitely demonic. However, at my church we have a puppet team made up of middle and high schoolers. Our puppets are nice and fairly normal looking. They sing nice songs and perform nice skits that do not give small children nightmares. My point is that not all puppets are demonic. But if they are wearing incredible amounts of blush and thier faces look slightly deformed, it’s best to stay away.



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rickopodomus

posted June 6, 2010 at 11:58 am


Holy haunted dreams Batman!



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P. Samuel

posted June 6, 2010 at 2:42 pm


I can perfectly relate feeling very frightened in speaking in public. I have never heard or read anything about the requirement of having to say the Sinner’s prayer in order to be saved from hell before one dies.



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Jonathan CHM

posted April 7, 2011 at 3:31 am


Some commentators might strongly oppose the request of the receipt of the Holy Spirit for the fact that the prophecy in John 16:7 pertaining to the receipt of the Holy Spirit should have been fulfilled in Acts 2 by the outpouring of the Holy Spirit during the Pentecost. They treat John 4:10, John 6:32-34 and Luke 11:13 to be applicable only before the day of Pentecost and all the events as mentioned in the book of Acts to be in transitional period and these give them the conclusion that the request of the Holy Spirit should be nullified currently. Discuss.

The comment that, John 16:7 is applicable to Acts 2 in which the disciples received the outpouring of the Holy Spirit and the current practice of requesting of the Holy Spirit should be in vain, has been found to be unjustifiable in the Gospel for the following reasons:

a) John 16:7 mentions that the Holy Spirit had to be descended upon the disciples when Jesus was glorified and it should have been fulfilled in Acts 2. However, neither John 16:7 nor any verses from the Bible does mention that the practice of requesting of the Holy Spirit should be abandoned after the outpouring of the Holy Spirit as mentioned in Acts 2. By asserting that the requesting of the Holy Spirit should be nullified after the day of Pentecost, is simply the act of making presumption in which it is not stated in the Bible. Or in other words, they simply add words of presumption that is not even stated in the Bible. We have been warned in the Bible not to abuse the Scripture by adding or subtracting words. Unless a verse or sentence has been stated clearly elsewhere in the Bible that requesting of the Holy Spirit has to be ceased or to be nullified after the day of Pentecost, it should then be rational to conclude that requesting of the Holy Spirit is redundant and not be to exercised in the future.

b)Some commentators might suggest that the phrase, they were come down prayed for them that they might receive the Holy Spirit, as mentioned in Acts 8:15 to be the exceptional case with their presumption that this event should fall during transitional period. However, neither Acts 8 nor any verses from the Bible that mentions that Acts 8 should be meant for transitional period and that should be the ultimate reason for the request of the Holy Spirit. By asserting that the event as mentioned in Acts 8 to be the transitional period has caused one to add words of presumption that is not even mentioned in the Scripture. What if the event as mentioned in Acts 8:15 in reality should not be meant for transitional period, the phrase, they were come down prayed for them that they might receive the Holy Spirit, in Acts 8:15 would give the impression that God demands the practice of the praying of the Holy Spirit as mentioned in Acts 2. As nothing is mentioned in Acts 8 that it is meant for transitional period to excuse people in the future to pray for the receipt of the Holy Spirit other than the presumptuous thought from some commentators, the intention to do away the requesting of the Holy Spirit with excuses to be give, would ultimately cause many people to be in the doom with their presumption that they have received the Holy Spirit and yet in reality, they might not have.

c) Some commentators might have suggested that the phrase, Have ye received the Holy Ghost since ye believed?, in Acts 19:2 is meant to be either the spoken words raised during the transitional period or for other excuse reason (such as, this is meant to be for exceptional case due to they had received or known merely John’s baptism) to discourage people from requesting the receipt of the Holy Spirit. However, neither Acts 19 nor any verses in the Bible does mention that Acts 19 should be meant for transitional period. The commentators simply add words of assumption to discourage people from requesting of the Holy Spirit. What if Acts 19 should not be considered as transitional period or it was not due to other reason (such as they had merely received John’s baptism) in realtiy, those people, that have this presumptuous thought, have undoubtedly added words of presumption in which they are not mentioned elsewhere in the Bible. What if praying for the receipt of the Holy Spirit has to be considered as part of the plan for God’s salvation, the intention to avoid and mislead many not to pray to receive the Holy Spirit, would cause many to be in the doom for not to be born again.

d)Neither John 4:10 nor John 6:32-34 nor Luke 11:13 mentions that the practice of the requesting of the Holy Spirit should be ceased on the day of Pentecost, it is irrational to add words of presumption in the Bible in which it is not even stated. John 16:7 emphasizes on the outpouring of the Holy Spirit when Jesus was glorified and nothing is mentioned vividly in the Bible about the cessation of the request of the Holy Spirit after the Pentecost. The commentators simply derive conclusion through guessing work that the practice of the requesting of the Holy Spirit should have been ceased after the Pentecost or the so-called, transitional period, that is defined by them, but not mentioned in the Bible.

Any mis-interpretation on the part of the way to salvation would simply lead people to presume that they are saved and have received the Holy Spirit without the realisation of the possible absence of the Holy Spirit within their bodies.

Some commentators might use the following verses to oppose the use of sinner’s prayer with the excuse that the Holy Spirit should be with them simply by mentioning that they do confess that Jesus is the Son of God and their recognition about the resurrection of Jesus:

1 John 4:15, “Whosoever shall confess that Jesus is the Son of God, God dwelleth in him, and he in God.”

Romans 10:9, “That if thou shalt confess with the mouth the Lord Jesus, and shall believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.”

Discuss.

At a glance, the phrase, Whosoever shall confess that Jesus is the Son of God, in 1 John 4:15 seems to imply that all those people, that confess Jesus as the Son of God, must have received the Holy Spirit. However, the following are the two distinctive cases from the Bible that have brought us to the attention that not all the people, that proclaim Jesus is the Son of God, have received the Holy Spirit:

a) Instances below that give us the implication that people could proclaim Jesus to be the Son of God even prior to the resurrection of Jesus:

i) Matthew 14:33, “Then they that were in the ship came and worshipped him, saying, of a truth thou art the Son of God.”

ii) Matthew 27:54, “Now when the centurion, and they that were with him, watching Jesus, saw the earthquake, and those things that were done, they feared greatly, saying, Truly this was the Son of God.”

iii) Mark 15:39, “And when the centurion, which stood over against him, saw that he so cried out, and gave up the ghost, he said, Truly this man was the Son of God.”

iv) John 1:49, “Nathamael answered and saith unto him, Rabbi, thou art the Son of God; thou art the king of Israel.”

v) John 11:27, “She saith unto him, Yea, Lord: I believe that thou art the Christ, the Son of God, which should come into the world.”

The following are the extracts to prove that those people, that are mentioned in Matthew 14:33, 27:54; John 1:49, 11:27, and Mark 15:39, did not receive the Holy Spirit prior to the resurrection of Jesus:

i) John 7:39, “(But this spake he of the Spirit, which they that believe on him should receive, for the Holy Ghost was not yet [given]: because that Jesus was not yet glorified.)”

ii) John 16:7, “Nevertheless I tell you the truth; It is expedient for you that I go away: for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I depart, I will send him unto you.”

Despite Matthew 14:33, 27:54; Mark 15:39; John 1:49 and John 11:27 were the events occurred prior to the day that Jesus was glorified and these people should not have received the Holy Spirit in accordance to John 7:39 and 16:7, yet they could proclaim Jesus as the Son of God at the absence of the Holy Spirit. This gives the ultimate conclusion that those people, that could proclaim Jesus to be the Son of God in this modern society, do not give any strong proof that they have God to be dwelt within their bodies.

b) Instances from the Scripture to prove that even demons could comment that Jesus is the Son of God and yet God do not dwell within their bodies. The following are the extracts:

i) Matthew 8:29, “And, behold, they cried out, saying, What have we to do with thee, Jesus, thou Son of God? art thou come hither to torment us before the time?”

ii) Mark 3:11, “And unclean spirits, when they saw him, fell down before him, and cried, saying, Thou art the Son of God.”

iii) Luke 4:41, “And devils also came out of many, crying out, and saying, Thou art Christ the Son of God. And he rebuke them suffered them not to speak: for they knew that he was Christ.”

iv) Luke 8:28, “When he saw Jesus, he cried out, and fell down before him, and with a loud voice said, what have I to do with thee, Jesus, thou Son of God most High? I beseech thee, torment me not.”

From the above explanations and the extracts, these could easily arrive at the conclusion that it is irrational to determine whether a person has received the Holy Spirit by simply hearing him/her in proclaiming that Jesus is the Son of God.

As it is irrational to determine whether a person has received the Holy Spirit simply by hearing him/her in proclaiming that Jesus is the Son of God, does it imply that 1 John 4:15 is contradictory to Matthew 14:33, 27:54; John 1:49, 11:27, and Mark 15:39? No, it is irrational to jump into this conclusion since if the word, confess, in 1 John 4:15 is be interpreted with broader definition that it should be accompanied with action instead of restricting to merely mouth-to-mouth confession. When the word, confess, in 1 John 4:15 has been interpreted with broader definition to include our sincere action towards God in treating and letting Jeus to be truly the Son of God to reign in our lives, we then would discover 1 John 4:15 does not contradict itself with other verses in the Bible. Or in other words, the person that confess that Jesus is the Son of God need to have high respect of Jesus and to have Him to come into his/her life to take control of him/her. Could a person be saved simply by proclaiming Jesus to be the Son of God and his/her Lord and yet refusing to allow Him to come into his/her life and to have Him to be the King to reign in his/her life and that is what God desires for.

James 2:19 provides the truth that the devils even believe in God and yet they tremble as a result of their faith without action. A person might proclaim that he/she believes in Jesus to be the Son of God and his/her Lord and yet God is interested whether his faith is accompanied with his willingness to accept Him to be his Personal Saviour and Lord. The following are the extracts for James 2:19-24 and these are self-explanatory:

James 2:19-24, “Thou believest that there is one God; thou doest well: the devils also believe, and tremble. But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead? Was not Abraham our father justified by works, when he had offered Isaac his son upon the altar? Seest thou how faith wrought with his works, and by works was faith made perfect? And the scripture was fulfilled which saith, Abraham believed God, and it was imputed unto him for righteousness: and he was called the Friend of God. Ye see then how that by works a man is justified, and not by faith only.”



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